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Full text of "The Graduate catalog"

Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Lyrasis Members and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/graduatecatalog1977univ 



GRADUATE CATALjOG 
1977/1978 

University of Maryland 
at College Park 






GRADUATE CATALOG 
1977/1978 

University of IVIaryland 
at College Park 



Cover Photo By Tom Poore 



Academic Resources 

Near the University of 

Maryland 

College Park 



Baltimore 

Johns Hopkins 

University 

UM Professional 

Schools 



Johns Hopkins 

Applied Physics Laboratory 

D 



D Atomic Energy 
Commission 



National Bureau D 
of Standards 



National Institutes 

of Health D 
National c 

IVIedical Library 



Naval Ordnance 
Laboratory 



Bethesda National 
Naval IVIedical 
D Center 



'National 
Agriculturey 
Library 



'Baltimore 
Washington 
Parkway 



□ Goddard Space 
Flight Center 



Baltimore 
Washington 
^ International 
Airport 



Smithsonian 
Ecological 
.Center 



College! 
.Park 



■ Beltway: 495 



Washington, DC 



Annapolis 

U.S. Naval 
Academy 



Dulles international ' 
Airport 



National ' 
Airport □ 



Resources Located In 
Washington 

American University 
Catholic University 
Corcoran Gallery 
Folger Shakespeare Library 
Freer Gallery 
Georgetovi/n University 



George Washington University 
Howard University 
Library of Congress 
National Archives 
National Gallery of Art 
Naval Observatory 
Naval Research Laboratory 
Phillips Collection 
Smithsonian Institution 



Chesapeake Bay 



Contents 



ACADEMIC RESOURCES MAP/i 
CONTENTS/ii 

THE UNIVERSITY 

Academic Calendar/ 1 

University Officers/2 

Graduate Schiool Officers and Staff/3 

Graduate Council Committees/4 

Plan of Academic Organization/5 

University Policy Statement/5 

Title IX Compliance Policy/5 

GENERAL INFORMATION 

History, National Organizations, Major Role/6 
Governance/6 
Location/7 

Special Research Resources, Special Op- 
portunities for tfie Artist/7, 8 
Libraries/8 

Institutes, Centers, and Bureaus/8 
Consortia/ 10 

FEES AND EXPENSES 

Graduate Fees/ 11 

Determination of in-State Status for Admis- 
sion, Tuition, and Charge-differential Pur- 
poses. /1 1 

FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE 

Fellowships/12 

Assistantships/12 

Loans and Part-time Employment/ 12 

Veteran Benefits/ 13 

STUDENT SERVICES 

Housing/ 13 
Food Services/ 14 
Career Development Center/ 14 
Counseling Center/ 14 
Health Care/14 
Health Insurance/14 
Publications of Interest to Graduate Stu- 
dents/14 

Student Data/Information Policy/15 

ADMISSION TO GRADUATE 
SCHOOL 

Graduate Programs/ 17 

Administrative Offices/ 17 

General/18 

Criteria for Admission/18 

Categories of Admission to Degree 

Programs/19 
Non-degree Admission Categories/ 19 
Offer of Admission/20 
Admission Time Limits/20 
Change of Objective. Status, Termination of 
Admission/21 
Admission of Faculty/21 
Application Instructions/21 
Foreign Student Applications/21 
Records Maintenance and Disposition/22 



REGISTRATION AND CREDITS 

Schedule of Classes/22 
Developing a Program/22 
Course Numbering System/22 
Designation of Full and Part-time Stu- 
dents/23 
Grades for Graduate Students/23 
Minimum Registration Requirements/Dis- 
sertation Research/Continuous Regis- 
tration/23 



Partial Credit Course Registration for Handi- 
capped Students/23 

Graduate Credit for Senior Under- 
graduates/24 

Undergraduate Credit for Graduate Level 
Courses/24 

Credit by Examination/24 

Transfer of Credit/24 

Criteria that Courses Must Meet to be Ac- 
cepted for Graduate Credit/24 

The Inter-campus Student/25 

DEGREE REQUIREMENTS 

Graduate School Requirements Applicable to 

all Master's Degrees/25 
Graduate School Requirements for the M.A., 

M.S.. Thesis Option, Non-thesis Option/ 

25,26 
Requirements for the M.Ed. Degree/26 
Requirements Applicable to Other Master's 

Degrees/26 
Graduate School Requirements Applicable to 

All Doctoral Degrees/26 
Graduate School Requirements for the 

Degree of Doctor of Philosophy/27 
Requirements for the Degree of Doctor of 
Education/27 
Requirements for Other Doctoral Degrees/ 

28 
Commencement/28 

THE GRADUATE FACULTY/29 

GRADUATE PROGRAMS 

Administration, Supervision and Curriculum 

Program/45 
Aerospace Engineering Program/47 
Agricultural and Extension Education 

Program/48 
Agncultural and Resource Economics 

Program/49 
Agricultural Engineenng Program/51 
Agronomy Program/52 
American Studies Program/54 
Animal Sciences Program/55 
Applied Mathematics Program/58 
Art Program/61 
Astronomy Program/63 
Botany Program/64 

Business and Management Program/67 
Chemical Engineering Program/73 
Chemical Physics Program/75 
Chemistry Program/76 
Civil Engineering Program/78 
Comparative Literature Program/82 
Computer Science Program/83 
Counseling and Personnel Services Program/ 

86 
Criminal Justice and Criminology Program/88 
Early Childhood-Elementary Education 

Program/89 
Economics Program/92 
Electrical Engineering Program/96 
Engineering Matenals Program/101 
English Language and Literature Program/ 

102 
Entomology Program/ 104 
Family and Community Development 

Program/106 
Food, Nutrition, and Institution Administration 

Program/ 107 
Food Science Program/109 
French Language and Literature Program/ 

111 
Geography Program/113 



German Language and Literature Program/ 

116 
Government and Politics Program/1 18 
Health Education Program/122 
Heanng and Speech Sciences Program/ 123 
History Program/124 

Concentration in the History and Philoso- 
phy of Science/129 
Horticulture Program/129 
Human Development Education Program 

(Institute for Child Study)/13i 
Industnal Education Program/ 133 
Journalism Program/ 135 
Library and Information Services Program/ 

136 
Mathematics Program/139 
Measurement and Statistics Program/145 
Mechanical Engineering Program/147 
Meteorology Program/ 151 
Microbiology Program/ 154 
Music Program/ 155 
Nuclear Engineering Program/ 158 
Nutntional Sciences Program/160 
Philosophy Program/161 
Physical Education Program/ 160 
Physics Program/ 166 
Poultry Science Program/171 
Psychology/171 
Recreation Program/ 175 
Secondary Education Program/177 
Social Foundations of Education Program/ 

180 
Sociology Program/ 181 
Spanish Language and Literature 

Program/ 184 
Special Education Program/186 
Speech and Dramatic Art Program/ 188 
Textiles and Consumer Economics Program/ 

192 
Urban Studies Program/194 
Zoology Program/196 

ADDITIONAL GRADUATE LEVEL 
COURSE OFFERINGS 

Afro-American Studies Courses/200 

Applied Design Courses/200 

Agnculture Courses/200 

Anthropology Courses/200 

Architecture Courses/201 

Chinese Courses/202 

Crafts Courses/202 

Dance Courses/203 

Engineering Cooperative Education Courses/ 

203 
Engineering Science Courses/203 
Engineering technology Fire Service Courses/ 

203 
Fire Protection Engineering Courses/203 
Foreign Language Courses/204 
Geology Courses/204 
Greek Courses/205 
Hebrew Courses/205 
Housing and Applied Design Courses/205 
Human and Community Resources Courses/ 

205 
Information Systems Management Courses/ 

205 
Japanese Courses/206 
Latin Courses/206 

Other University of Maryland 
Campuses/207 

Index/208 



University of iVIaryland, College Park 

Academic Calendar 



Fall Semester, 1977 

August 22, 23 

Monday-Tuesday 

Registration 

August 24 
Wednesday 
Classes Begin 

August 29-September 7 
Monday-Wednesday 
Late Registration 

September 5 

Monday 

Holiday. Labor Day 

September 7 
Wednesday 
End of Sctiedule Adjustment Period 

November 1 

Tuesday 

Last Day to Drop a Course 

November 23-27 
Wednesday-Sunday 
Thanksgiving Recess 

December 9 

Friday 

Last Day of Classes 

December 10, 1 1 
Saturday-Sunday 
Examination Study Days 

December l'2-19 
Monday-Monday 
Final Examination Period 

December 19 

Monday 

Commencement, 7:30 p.m 



Spring Semester, 1978 

January 16, 17 

Monday-Tuesday 

Registration 

January 18 
Wednesday 
Classes Begin 

January 23-31 
Monday-Tuesday 
Late Registration 

January 31 

Tuesday 

End of Schedule Adjustment Period 

March 20-26 
Monday-Sunday 
Spring Recess 

April 4 

Tuesday 

Last Day to Drop a Course 

May 9- 

Tuesday 

Last Day of Classes 

May 10 
Wednesday 
Examination Study Day 

May 11-18 
Thursday-Thursday 
Final Examination Period 

May 19 

Friday 

Commencement, 2:00 p.m. 



Fall Semester, 1978 Summer Session, 1978 



August 21, 22 
Monday, Tuesday 

Registration 

August 23 
Wednesday 
Classes Begin 

September 4 

Monday 

Holiday, Labor Day 

November 22-26 
Wednesday-Sunday 
Thanksgiving Recess 

December 8 

Friday 

Last Day of Classes 

December 9 
Saturday 
Examination Study Day 

December 11-18 
Monday-Monday 
Final Examination Period 

December 18 

Monday 

Commencement, 730 p.m. 



Session I 

May 22 
Monday 
Registration 

May 23 
Tuesday 
Classes Begin 

May 29 
Monday 
Holiday, Memorial Day 

June 30 
Friday 
Term Ends 



Session II 

June 28 

Wednesday 

Registration 

July 4 

Tuesday 

Holiday, Independence Day 

Julys 

Wednesday 
Classes Begin 

August 1 1 
Fnday 
Term Ends 



The University / 1 



University Officers 



Board of Regents 

Chairman 

Dr. B. Herbert Brown 

Vice Chairman 

Mr Hugh A. McMullen 

Secretary 

Dr. Samuel H. Hoover 

Treasurer 

Mr N. Thomas Whitlington. Jr. 

Assistant Secretary 
Mrs Mary H. Broadwater 

Assistant Treasurer 
Mr. John C Scarbath 

Members 

Mr. Percy M Chaimson 

Mr Robert M. Coultas, Jr. 

Mr. Ralph W. Frey 

The Hon Young D Nance, ex officio 

Mr. A. Paul Moss 

Mr. James W. Motsay 

Mr. Peter F. O Malley 

The Hon. Joseph D Tydlngs 

Mr. Wilbur G. Valentine 



Central Administration 
of the University 

President 
Wilson H. Elkins 

Vice President for General Administration 
Donald W OConnell 

Vice President for Academic Affairs 
R. Lee Hornbake 

Vice President for Graduate Studies and 

Research 

Michael J Pelczar. Jr. 

Vice President for Agricultural Affairs and 
Legislative Relations 
Frank L. Bentz. Jr 

Vice President for Development 
Robert Smith 



College Park Campus 
Administration 

Chancellor 

Robert L. Gluckstern 

Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs 
Nancie L. Gonzalez 

Vice Chancellor for Administrative Affairs 
(Acting) John A. Bielec 

Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs 
William L. Thomas. Jr. 

Provosts at College 
Park 

Divison of Agricultural and Life Sciences 
Francis C Stark 

Division of Arts and Humanities 
Robert A. Corrigan 

Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences 
Murray Polakoff 

Division of Human and Community Resources 
George J Funaro 

Division of Mathematical and Physical Sciences 
and Engineenng 
Joseph M Marchello 



Deans at College Park 

School of Architecture 
John W. Hill 

College of Agriculture 
Gordon M. Caims 

College of Business Management 
Rudolph P. Lamone 

College of Education 
Dean C. Corrigan 

College of Engineenng 
George E. Dieter. Jr. 

College o' Human Ecology 
John R. Beaton 

College of Journalism 
Ray E. Hiebert 

College of Library and Information Services 
Acting Dean; Jerry S. Kidd 

College of Physical Education. Recreation and 

Health 

Marvin H. Eyier 

Administrative Dean for Graduate Studies 
David S. Sparks 

Administrative Dean for Summer Programs 
Melvin N- Bernstein 

Administrative Dean for Undergraduate Studies 
Robert E Shoenberg 



2 / The University 



Graduate School 
Officers and Staff 



Dean for Graduate Studies 

David S. Sparks. A.B., Grinnell College. 1944; 
M.A.. University of Chicago. 1945; Ph.D.. 1951. 

Associate Dean for Graduate 
Studies 

Robert E. Menzer. B.S.. University of 
Pennsylvania, 1960; M.S. University of tvlary- 
land, 1962; Ph.D., University of Wisconsin. 1964. 



Assistant Dean for Graduate 
Studies 

Archie L. Buffkins. B.S . Jackson State Univer- 
sity. 1956; M.A.. 1961; Ed. D.. Columbia Univer- 
sity, 1963, 

Assistants to the Dean 

Alice M. Piper, B,A,, University of Pittsburgh, 

1941, 
Joanna F, Schmeissner, B,A., Agnes Scott 
College, 1960; MA,, Yale University, 1962, 



Director of Graduate Records 

Carl L Seidel, B S., University of Maryland, 1963. 

Assistant Director 

Lois M. Lyon. B.A.. University of Michigan. 1952. 



Graduate Council 



Ex-officio Councillors 

Chancellor. Robert L. Gluckstern 
Vice Chancellor. Nancie L, Gonzalez 
Dean, David S. Sparks 
Associate Dean. Robert E, Menzer 

Appointed Councillors 

Professor William L. Klarman. Botany 

Professor Elizabeth Pemberton. Art 

Professor John A. Haslem, Business and Manage- 
ment 

Professor Mane S. Davidson. Institute for Child 
Study 

Professor Albert Gomezplata. Chemical Engi- 
neering 



Elected Councillors 

Mr. David Abercrombie. Chemistry 
Professor Mark Keeney. Chemistry 
Professor Allen L. Steinhauer. Entomology 
Professor Bernard A. Twigg. Horticulture 
Professor Herman J. Belz. History 
Professor Beatrice C. Fink. French and Italian 
Mr. Paul Noga. Speech and Dramatic Art 
Professor John D. Russell. English 
Mr, Michael Courlander. Institute for Criminal 

Justice and Cnminology 
Professor Walter W Deshler. Geography 
Professor Irwin L. Goldstein. Psychology 
Professor Roger C. Pfaffenbergr. Business and 

Management 



Professor Rachel Dardis. Textiles and Con- 
sumer Economics 

Professor Robert W, Ridky, Secondary Educa- 
tion 

Ms Barbara Sadowski, Early Childhood - 
Elementary Education 

Professor David L. Williams. Early Childhood- 
Elementary Education 

Mr. James H. Beall. Physics 

Professor Patrick F. Cunniff. Mechanical Engi- 
neenng 

Professor Karen Kirby. Mathematics 

Professor David L, Matthews. Institute for Phy- 
sical Sciences and Technology 



The University / 3 



Committees of the 
Graduate Council 



COMMITTEE ON ACADEMIC 
STANDARDS 

Prof Beatrice C. Fink, Chairwoman, French & 

Italian, 1977 
Prof. Theodore W. Cadman, Chemical Engineer- 
ing, 1979 
Prof. Irwin L. Goldstein, Psychology, 1978 
Prof. IVIarshall L. Ginter, Molecular Physics, 1978 
Prof. J. Norman Hansen, Chemistry, 1978 
Prof. Mancur L. Olson, Economics. 1977 
Prof, Elizabeth Pemberton. Art, 1979 
Prof. Marie B. Pennbam, History, 1978 
Prof. Cyril Ponnamperuma, Chemistry, 1978 
Prof. William D. Schafer, Measurement & Statis- 
tics, 1977 
Prof. Francis C. Stark. Horticulture, 1977 
Mr. Ken Baskin. Graduate Student. English, 

1977 
Mr. Gregory Nenstiel, Graduate Student, 

Secondary Education, 1978 
Dr, Robert E. Menzer, ex officio 

COMMITTEE ON ADMISSIONS 

Prof. Paul J. Smith, Chairman, Mathematics, 

1977 
Prof. Pedro Albrecht, Civil Engineering, 1979 
Prof. Esther K Birdsall, English, 1978 
Prof. Antonio F. Chaves. Geography, 1978 
Prof Lindley Darden. Philosophy, 1979 
Prof. Jean R. Hebeler, Special Education, 1979 
Prof. Burns F. Husman, Physical Education. 

1977 
Prof. Paul A. Meyer, Economics, 1978 
Prof. James R IVIiller, Agronomy, 1977 
Prof. Charles W. Reynolds, Horticulture, 1978 
Mr, Gerald Lordan, Graduate Student, 

Elementary Education, 1977 
Mr. Karl Wright, Graduate Student, Agric. & 

Resource Econ., 1978 
Mr. Carl L. Seidel. ex officio 

COMMITTEE ON ELECTIONS 

Prof. Roger Meersman. Chairman, Speech & 

Dramatic Arts, 1977 
Prof. Jomills H. Braddock, Sociology, 1979 
Prof. Henry A. Lepper, Jr., Civil Engineering, 

1978 
Prof. John H, Vandersall, Dairy Science, 1979 
Prof Leda Wilson. Family & Comm. Dev,. 1977 
Mrs. Alice M. Piper, ex officio 

COMMITTEE ON FELLOWSHIPS 

Prof Edward Z. Dager. Chairman. Sociology, 

1978 
Prof. C. Rose Broome, Botany, 1978 
Prof. Manlyn G Church, Elementary Education, 

1977 
Prof Mane S Davidson, Inst, for Child Study, 

1978 
Prof. Walter W. Deshler. Geography. 1977 
Prof. Douglas J Farquhar. Art. 1978 
Prof. Albert Gomezplata. Chemical Engineenng. 

1977 
Prof. James A. Hummel. Mathematics. 1979 
Prof Henry Mendeloff. Spanish & Portuguese, 

1979 



4 / The University 



Prof Joseph H. Scares, Poultry, 1977 
Mr. Dewey Covington, Graduate Student. 

Governments Politics. 1977 
Ms. Ruth Gordner. Graduate Student. Urban 

Studies. 1978 
Dr Archie L. Buffkins. ex officio 

COMMITTEE ON GRADUATE 
FACULTY 

Prof Hayes A. Newby, Chairman. Hearing & 

Speech Science. 1977 
Prof. J. Robert Anderson. Physics. 1977 
Prof. Louise M. Berman. Early Childhood- Elem. 

Ed.. 1978 
Prof William E. Bickley. Entomology. 1977 
Prof Sherod M. Cooper, Jr., English. 1978 
Prof Rachel Dardis, Textiles & Consumer Econ.. 

1979 
Prof. Gertrude S. Fish, Housing & Applied 

Design. 1977 
Prof. Clifford M. Foust. History. 1979 
Prof. Chester C Holmlund. Chemistry. 1977 
Prof. John A. Haslem. Business & Management. 

1979 
Prof Jack Minker. Computer Science. 1978 
Dr Robert E. Menzer. ex officio 

COMMITTEE ON PROGRAM 
REVIEW 

Prof. Clifford L. Sayre. Chairman. Mechanical 

Engineenng. 1977 
Prof. Marjorie H. Gardner. Science Education, 

1978 
Prof Jacob K Goldhaber. Mathematics, 1977 
Prof. Ramon E Henkel, Sociology, 1978 
Prof Williams L Klarman, Botany, 1979 
Prof. Myron O. Lounsbury, American Studies, 

1978 
Prof Robert J. Munn, Chemistry, 1977 
Prof Ellin Scholnick, Psychology, 1979 
Prof Betty F Smith, Textiles & Consumer Econ., 

1979 
Ms Nancy Strunah, Graduate Student, Physical 

Education, 1977 
Mr James Beall, Graduate Student, Physics, 

1978 
Dr. Robert E. menzer, ex officio 

COMMITTEE ON PROGRAMS AND 
COURSES 

Prof Bruce R Fretz, Chairman, Psychology, 

1977 
Prof. Richard H. Austing, Computer Science. 

1977 
Prof Audrey Barnett. Zoology, 1979 
Prof Douglas G Currie, Physics and Astronomy, 

1979 
Prof Patricia Florestano, Urban Studies, 1978 
Prof Mark Keeney, Chemistry, 1977 
Prof David Lockard. Secondary Education, 

1979 
Prof Leonard I Lutwack, English, 1978 
Prof George L Marx, Couns. & Personnel 

Service, 1977 
Prof Roger L. Meersman, Speech & Dramatic 

Arts, 1979 



Prof. Don C. Piper, Government & Politics, 1978 
Prof. James M. Stewart, Chemistry, 1978 
Prof Eugene Owen, Graduate Student, Agri. & 

Ext. Education, 1977 
Ms Barbara Williams, Graduate Student, 

Astronomy, 1978 
Dr. Robert E Menzer, ex officio 

COMMITTEE ON PUBLICATIONS 

Prof. John Duffy, Chairman, History, 1979 

Prof, William S, Benedict, IMP, 1979 

Prof. Kenneth C. W. Kammeyer, Sociology, 1978 

Prof John W. Kinnaird, English, 1979 

Prof. George Levitine, Art, 1977 

Prof. Allen L. Steinhauer, Entomology, 1978 

Mr. Gerald Day, Graduate Student, Industrial 

Education, 1977 
Ms. Adrienne Gray, Graduate Student, Journa- 
lism, 1978 
Mrs. Alice M, Piper, ex officio 

COMMITTEE ON RESEARCH 

Prof. Rita Colwell, Chairo/oman, Microbiology, 

1979 
Prof Manoj K. Banerjee, Physics, 1978 
Prof Roger Bell, Astronomy, 1977 
Prof. Dudley Dillard, Economics, 1978 
Prof. Richard B. Imberski, Zoology, 1978 
Prof. Peter P. Lejins, Inst, of Criminal Justice 

& Cnminology, 1977 
Prof. David L. Matthews, IPST, 1979 
Prof- Henry Mendeloff, Spanish & Portuguese, 

1977 
Prof John R Moore. Agn. & Resource Econ , 

1978 
Prof Marlene Mayo, History, 1979 
Prof. Carol Seefeldt, Early Childhood -Elem 

Ed,, 1979 
Prof. Robert M. Steinman, Psychology, 1977 
Prof. Calhoun Winton, English, 1979 
Mr. Russel Tobias, Graduate Student, Physics, 

1977 
Mr David Abercrombie, Graduate Student, 

Chemistry. 1978 
Dr Robert E, Menzer. ex officio 

COMMITTEE ON STUDENT LIFE 

Prof. Charles R. Curtis. Chairman. Botany. 1978 
Prof, John D. Anderson, Aerospace Engineer- 
ing, 1979 
Prof Alan W DeSilva. Physics. 1978 
Prof, Larry W. Douglass, Dairy Science, 1979 
Prof Eldon Lanning, Government & Politics, 

1979 
Prof. Agnes B. Hatfield. Institute for Child Study, 

1977 
Prof. Robert K. Hirzel, Sociology, 1977 
Prof, Guenter G. Pfister, Germanic & Slavic, 

1978 
Prof. John D. Russell, English, 1978 
Prof. David L, Williams, Early Childhood -Elem. 

Ed., 1978 
Mr Michael Courlander, Graduate Student, 

Criminal Justice & Criminology, 1978 
Mr Henry F Ward, Graduate Student, Music, 

1977 
Dr. Archie L. Buffkins, ex officio 






Plan of Academic 
Organization 



Division of Agricultural and Life 
Sciences: 

College of Agriculture: 
Agncultural and Extension Education 
Agncultural and Resource Economics 
Agncultural Engineenng 
Agronomy 
Animal Science 
Dairy Science 
Horticulture 

Institute of Applied Agriculture 
Poultry Science 
Vetennary Science 

Other Units within the Division: 
Botany 
Chemistry 
Entomology 
Geology 
Microbiology 
Zoology 

Division of Arts and Humanities: 

School of Architecture 

College of Journalism 

Other Units within the Division: 
American Studies Program 
Art 

Classics 
Dance 
English 

French and Italian 
Germanic and Slavic 
History 
Music 



Oriental and Hebrew Program 

Philosophy 

Spanish and Portuguese 

Speech and Dramatic Art 

Division of Behavioral and Social 
Sciences: 

College of Business and Management 

Other Units within the Division: 
Afro-American Studies 
Anthropology 

Bureau of Business and Economic Research 
Bureau of Governmental Research 
Economics 
Geography 

Government and Politics 
Hearing and Speech Sciences 
Information Systems Management 
Institute for Urban Studies 
Institute of Criminal Justice and Cnminology 
Linguistics Program 
Psychology 
Sociology 

Division of Human and Community 
Resources: 

College of Education: 
Administration Supervision and Curriculum 

Counseling and Personnel Services 
Early Childhood Elementary Education 
Industrial Education 
Institute for Child Study 
Measurement & Statistics 
Secondary Education 
Special Education 



College of Human Ecology 

Family and Community Development 
Foods. Nutntion and Institution Administration 
Housing and Applied Design 
Textiles and Consumer Economics 

College of Library and Information Services 

College of Physical Education, Recreation and 
Health: 
Health Education 
Physical Education 
Recreation 



Division of Mathematical and 
Physical Sciences and 
Engineering: 

College of Engineering: 
Aero-Space Engineering 
Chemical Engineering 
C'vil Engineenng 
Electncal Engineenng 
Fire Protection Curnculum 
Mechanical Engineering 

Other Units within the Division: 
Applied Mathematics Program 
Center for Matenals Research 
Computer Science 

Institute for Physical Sciences and Tech- 
nology 
Meteorology Program 
Mathematics 
Physics and Astronomy 



University Policy Statement 

The provisions of this publication are not to be 
regarded as an irrevocable contract between the 
student and the University of Maryland. Changes 
are effected from time to time in the general regu- 
lations and in the academic requirements There 
are established procedures for making changes, 
procedures which protect the institution s integri- 
ty and the individual student s interest and wel- 
fare. A curnculum or graduation requirement, 
when altered, is not made retroactive unless the 
alteration is to the students advantage and can 
be accommodated within the span of years nor- 
mally required for graduation. When the actions 
of a student are judged by competent authonty, 
using established procedure, to be detnmental to 
the interests of the university community, that 
person may be required to withdraw from the 
university. 



The University of Maryland, in all its branches 
and divisions, subscnbes to a policy of equal 
educational and employment opportunity for 
people of every race, creed, ethnic ongin. and 
sex 

It is university policy that smoking in class- 
rooms is prohibited unless all participants agree 
to the contrary. Any student has the nght to re- 
mind the instructor of this policy throughout the 
duration of the class. 



Title IX Compliance Policy 

The University of Maryland at College Park does 
not discriminate on the basis of sex in its educa- 
tional programs and activities The policy of 
non-discnmination extends to employment in the 
institution and academic admission to the institu- 
tion. Such discnmination is prohibited by Title IX 



of the Education Amendments of 1972 (20 U S.C. 
1681 . et seq ) and 45 C F.R 86. and this notifica- 
tion IS required under the Federal regulations pur- 
suant to 20 use 1681 et seq. 

Inquiries concerning the application of Title IX 
and Part 86 of 45 C F R to the University of Mary- 
land. College Park, may be directed to the Office 
of Human Relations Programs. Mam Administra- 
tion Building, University of Maryland. College 
Park: or to the Director of the Office of Civil 
Rights of the Department of Health Education, 
and Welfare, Washington, DC. 

The masculine gender of personal pronouns 
in this document includes the feminine gender. 



The University / 5 



General Information 



History 

The history of the Graduate School at the University of 
Maryland, College Park has been one of rapid, at times 
almost explosive, growfth. Established in 1919 with an 
enrollment of 13, the Graduate School has developed in- 
to one of the nation's largest. In the fall of 1976, there 
were approximately 7,800 graduate students enrolled in 
the more than 65 graduate programs and departments. In 
the academic year 1975-1976, 369 doctoral degrees and 
1,442 master's degrees were awarded. 

The Graduate School has matched its tremendous 
growth In size by an even more significant growth in its 
role as a center for the advancement of knowledge. The 
Graduate School has increasingly sought scholars of the 
highest quality, and today it numbers among its faculty 
men and women who have achieved national recognition 
and eminence in their fields. Active in scholarship in 
every area, students and faculty members of the Grad- 
uate School have designed equipment for the lunar 
space flights, excavated the gardens in Pompeii, per- 
formed important research in the unique ecological sys- 
tems of the Chesapeake Bay, and won national awards 
for their creative work in fiction, poetry, and the arts. 

The history of the Graduate School has been a history 
of growth in service as well as scholarship. Graduate pro- 
grams at the University have always reflected the mis- 
sion of the School as a servant to the State of Maryland. 
That mission is continued today more vigorously than 
ever in the numerous programs, centers, and special re- 
search projects through which graduate faculty and stu- 
dents address directly the needs of the residents of 
Maryland. 

In the last two decades, the national impact of the 
Graduate School has become of major importance as 
well, with the ever increasing involvement of talented 
faculty and graduate students in the work of the many 
federal agencies, institutions, libraries, and programs in 
the nation's Capital. 

Finally, the University of Maryland Graduate School is 
especially aware today of its mission to the wider com- 
munity of man. The Graduate School not only has a large 
number of students and faculty from other countries, but 
it also is well represented in international conferences 
and symposia by faculty members who participate on a 
regular basis. In several divisions, there are specific proj- 
ects and programs undertaken jointly with foreign uni- 
versities, and the results of faculty research are pub- 
lished in international journals. 

The Graduate School today is active and vital, con- 
scious of its past growth and achievements and eager to 
develop more fully its potential as a leading educational 
and research institution. Its goal is to sustain and 
strengthen in every area the intellectual quality and com- 
mitment to service and significant scholarship that char- 
acterize the foremost graduate institutions. 

National Organizations 

In order to shape and participate in national policies and 
developments in graduate education, the Graduate 
School maintains close contact with other graduate 
schools and is a member of the following national orga- 
nizations: the Association of American Universities, the 

6 / General Information 



Association of Graduate Schools, and the Council of Grad- 
uate Schools in the United States. 

Major Role 

The University of Maryland is keenly aware of the chal- 
lenges facing graduate education today. The Graduate 
School has sought innovative and productive ways to ad- 
just to the problems created by restricting financial real- 
ities and fluctuating opportunities for professionals in 
every field. In addition, the Graduate School has chan- 
nelled many of its resources into a variety of academic 
services that meet the inceasing demands of our society 
on universities. 

In all of its activities, however, the Graduate School is 
guided by the belief that it can best serve society and re- 
spond to current challenges by a consistent and firm 
commitment to its traditional principles. Accordingly, the 
major role of the Graduate School is to provide for the ed- 
ucation of students in the scholarly methods of intellectu- 
al inquiry and critical analysis; to train them in the disci- 
pline and skills necessary for beneficial research; and to 
foster in them a dedication to creative thought and the 
search for knowledge. 

Not simply an extension of the colleges, schools, or di- 
visions, the Graduate School is specifically designed to 
prepare those who will dedicate themselves to individual 
inquiry and service. To achieve this goal, it promotes the 
freedom and intellectual environment necessary to stim- 
ulate research and scholarship of the highest quality for 
both students and faculty. 

Governance 

The Graduate Faculty 

In 1956 the Graduate Faculty adopted a formal Constitu- 
tion to "provide a means for the Graduate Faculty to dis- 
charge its functions with respect to educational policies 
and procedures of the Graduate School on this campus." 
That Constitution, as amended in 1968 and 1974, contin- 
ues to govern the policies and procedures of the Graduate 
School on the College Park Campus. 

The Graduate Faculty, working through the Assembly 
and the Graduate Council, establishes policies governing 
admission to graduate study and minimum requirements 
to be met by all students seeking advanced degrees in 
more than sixty-five graduate departments and programs 
leading to degrees awarded by the Graduate Faculty on 
the College Park Campus. The faculties of the individual 
academic departments and interdisciplinary graduate pro- 
grams may establish additional requirements for admis- 
sion or for degrees above the minima established by the 
Graduate Council. 

The Assembly of the Graduate Faculty consists of all 
full and associate members of the Graduate Faculty who, 
through their participation in research and graduate in- 
struction, have displayed a capacity for individual research 
or creative and scholarly work at the highest levels. 

The Graduate Council consists of members of the Grad- 
uate Faculty elected by the Assembly, as well as appoint- 
ed and ex officio members. It is charged with the formu- 
lation of the policies and procedures for the Graduate 
School of College Park including admission standards. 



the review of individual student programs, the review of all 
new programs and courses submitted by members of the 
Graduate Faculty, graduate student theses and disserta- 
tions, and the periodic review of all graduate degree pro- 
grams. It meets approximately eight times a year to con- 
duct its regular business and may be called into special 
session as the need arises. 

In its work the Graduate Council is aided and advised by 
ten standing committees. Included are committees on: 
Academic Standards, Admissions, Elections, Fellowships, 
Program Review, Graduate Faculty, Programs and Courses, 
Publications, Research, and Student Life. Membership on ' 
these committees is limited to members of the Graduate 
Faculty and graduate students. Members are appointed by 
the Dean for Graduate Studies for terms of three years. 

Graduate Students 

The value of student opinion and participation in determin- 
ing matters of policy, procedure, and administration is 
appreciated and encouraged. In addition to their appoint- 
ments to the Committees of the Graduate Council, graduate 
students serve on many divisional and departmental com- 
mittees. 

Established in 1970, the Chancellor's Graduate Student 
Advisory Council (CGSAC) meets periodically with the 
Chancellor of the College Park campus and regularly on its 
own to discuss a wide-range of issues affecting the grad- 
uate community (e.g. the role and mission of higher educa- 
tion; stipends for fellows, assistants, and researchers; part- 
time graduate student problems; redress of grievances; 
social activities; etc.). The Council also meets with adminis- 
trative leaders from all fields and divisions as pertinent to 
problem solving and alternatives. In addition, the Council 
serves as a source of information to State Legislators and 
members of the Board of Regents. Membership is open to 
all interested students. For additional information, contact 
the Office of the Dean for Graduate Studies. 

Location 

In location, faculty and students at the University of Mary- 
land enjoy the best of all possible worlds. Situated on 1,300 
acres in Prince Georges County, the College Park Campus 
is a part of the larger metropolitan area of Washington, D.C., 
which is rapidly becoming the nation's capital for cultural 
and intellectual activity as well as for political power. The 
Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, the Filene Center, 
and the many fine area theaters regularly present perfor- 
mances by the world's most exciting and renowned artists. 
The Smithsonian Museums and the National Gallery of Art, 
among others, sponsor standing collections and special ex- 
hibits that attract national attention. In addition to cultural 
activities, the nation's Capital provides interested students 
the opportunity to observe at first hand the work of federal 
institutions; to sit in the galleries of Congress; to watch the 
Supreme Court in session; and to attend public Congres- 
sional hearings. The possibilities for personal enrichment 
offered in this exciting cosmopolitan area are indeed 
enormous. 

Outside the metropolitan area, and just minutes from the 
campus, the scene in the Maryland countryside is pleasant- 
ly rural. Maryland offers a great variety of recreational and 
leisure activities in its many fine national and state parks. 



from the Catoctin Mountains in Western Maryland to the 
Assateague Island National Seashore on the Atlantic bound 
Eastern Shore, all within a pleasant drive from the campus. 
Historic Annapolis, the state capital, is only a short drive 
away, and the city of Baltimore, with its rich variety of 
ethnic heritages, its cultural and educational institutions, 
and its impressive urban transformation, is only thirty miles 
from College Park. 

Special Research Resources 

The College Park Campus is in the midst of one of the 
greatest concentrations of research facilities and intellec- 
tual talent in the nation, if not in the world. Libraries and 
laboratories serving virtually every academic discipline 
are within easy commuting distance. There is a steady 
and growing interchange of ideas, information, technical 
skills, and scholars between the university and these cen- 
ters. The libraries and facilities of many of these centers 
are open to qualified graduate students at the university. 
The resources of many more are available by special ar- 
rangement. 

In the humanities, the Library of Congress and the 
Folger Library, with its extensive collection of rare manu- 
scripts, are among the world's most outstanding research 
libraries. In addition, Dumbarton Oaks; the National Ar- 
chives; the Smithsonian Institution; the World Bank; the 
National Library of Medicine; the National Agricultural 
Library; the Enoch Pratt Free Library of Baltimore; the 
libraries of the Federal Departments of Labor; Commerce; 
Interior; Health, Education, and Welfare; Housing and 
Urban Development; and Transportation, and approximate- 
ly 500 other specialized libraries are all within a few min- 
utes drive of the College Park Campus. These resources 
make the University of Maryland one of the most attrac- 
tive in the nation for scholars of all disciplines. 

The proximity of the Beltsville Agricultural Research 
Center of the United States Department of Agriculture has 
stimulated the development of both laboratories and op- 
portunitites for field research in the agricultural and life 
sciences. The National Institutes of Health offer unparal- 
leled opportunities for collaboration in biomedical and be- 
havioral research. Opportunities are also available for 
collaborative graduate study programs with other major 
government laboratories, such as the National Bureau of 
Standards and the Naval Research Laboratory. 

The long-standing involvement of the State of Maryland 
in the development of the commercial and recreational re- 
sources of the Chesapeake Bay has resulted in the estab- 
lishment of outstanding research facilities for the study 
of marine biology at the University of Maryland Center for 
Environmental and Estuarine Studies, with research facili- 
ties at Horn Point near Cambridge, at Crisfield, and at 
Solomons Island, Maryland. 

Campus facilities are also excellent for other disci- 
plines. Work in the behavioral sciences, particularly In 
learning, is centered in laboratories equipped for fully 
automated research on rats, pigeons, and monkeys. 

Exceptional research facilities in the physical sciences 
include a 160 MeV cyclotron; two small Van de Graaff 
accelerators; an assortment of computers, including a 
PDP 11/45, aUNIVAC 1108 and a UNIVAC 1100/41; a 10 
KW training nuclear reactor; a full scale low velocity wind 
tunnel; several small hypersonic helium wind tunnels; 



General Information / 7 



specialized facilities in both the Institute for Physical 
Science and Technology and the Center for Materials Re- 
search; a psychopharmacology laboratory; shock tubes; 
a quiescent plasma device (Q machine) for plasma re- 
search; and rotating tanks for laboratory studies of mete- 
orological phenomena. The university also ovi^ns and oper- 
ate one of the vi/orld's largest and most sophisticated 
long-v(/avelength radio telescopes located in Clark Lake, 
California and a cosmic ray laboratory located in New 
Mexico. 



Special Opportunities for Artists 

Advanced work in the creative and performing arts at Col- 
lege Park is concentrated in the Tawes Fine Arts Building 
and the recently completed Art-Sociology Building. Cre- 
ative work is greatly stimulated by the close interaction 
that has developed between the students and faculty of 
the University and the artists and scholars at the National 
Gallery, the Corcoran Gallery, the Hirshorn Museum, the 
Phillips Gallery, the Museum of Modern Art, the 
Smithsonian Institution, as well as the musicians of the 
National Symphony Orchestra and smaller musical 
groups. The Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts and 
the Filene Center (Wolf Trap Farm Park) have further en- 
hanced the climate for creative artists attending the Uni- 
versity. 

Outstanding work on campus in theater, dance, radio, 
and television is aided by the proximity of the campus to 
the National Theater, the Arena Stage, the Morris Mechan- 
ic Theater, and numerous little theater groups in the 
Washington and Baltimore area. There is a frequent and 
steady interchange of ideas and talent between students 
and faculty at the University and both educational and 
commercial radio and television media as a consequence 
of the large professional staffs which are maintained in 
the Washington area. 

Libraries 

The University library system includes major research 
libraries on both the College Park and Baltimore Cam- 
puses. 

The Theodore R. McKeldin Library is the graduate li- 
brary of the College Park Campus, containing reference 
works, periodicals, circulating books, and other materials 
in all fields of research and instruction. Other libraries 
Include the Engineering and Physical Sciences Library, 
the Architecture Library, and the Charles White Memorial 
Library for chemistry and the life sciences. A new Under- 
graduate Library opened in 1972. 

The Libraries on the College Park Campus contain near- 
ly 2,000,000 volumes, and they subscribe to more than 
15,000 periodicals and newspapers. Additional collections 
of research materials are available on microfilm, micro- 
fiche, phonorecords, tapes, and films. 

Special collections include those of Richard von Mises 
in mathematics and applied mechanics; Max Born in the 
physical sciences; Thomas i. Cook in political science; 
Romeo Mansueti in the biological sciences; Katherine 
Anne Porter; Maryland; U.S. government publications 
(for which the University is a regional depository); docu- 
ments of the United Nations, the League of Nations and 



other international organizations, agricultural experiment 
station and extension service publications; maps from the 
U.S. Army Map Service; the files of the Industrial Union of 
Marine and Shipbuilding Workers of America; the 
Wallenstein collection of musical scores; and research 
collections of the American Bandmasters Association, 
the National Association of Wind and Percussion Instruc- 
tors, and the Music Educators National Conference. In 
addition, the collections include microfilm productions 
of government documents, rare books, early journals, and 
newspapers. 

Within the East Asia Collection is the world's largest 
repository of published and unpublished Japanese- 
language materials from the Allied Occupation period. 

Institutes, Centers, and Bureaus 

Acknowledging the importance of an interdisciplinary 
approach to knowledge, the University maintains orga- 
nized research units outside the usual departmental struc- 
tures. These institutes, centers, and bureaus offer valu- 
able opportunities for faculty and students to engage in 
research and study in specialized areas and in public ser- 
vice activities. 

Institute for Child Study: Director: Hugh Perkins. In its 
program the institute collects, interprets, and synthesizes 
the scientific findings in various fields that are concerned 
with human growth, development, learning and behavior. 
The Institute offers graduate programs leading to the 
Master of Education, Master of Arts, Doctor of Philosophy 
and Doctor of Education degrees, and the Advanced Grad- 
uate Specialist Certificate in the area of human develop- 
ment. 

Institute for Criminal Justice and Criminology: Director: 
Peter P. Lejins. The purpose of the Institute is to provide 
an organizational and administrative unit for the interests 
and activities of the University, its faculty and students 
in the areas of the law enforcement, criminology and cor- 
rections. Through the Institute, the University became a 
member of the seven-university National Criminal Justice 
Educational Development Consortium. The Institute of- 
fers the M.A. degree with options in criminology or crim- 
inal justice and the Ph.D. degree in criminal justice and 
criminology. 

Institute for Physical Science and Technology: Director, 
Joseph Silverman. The Institute for Physical Science and 
Technology is a center for interdisciplinary research in 
pure and applied science problems that lie between those 
areas served by the academic departments. These inter- 
disciplinary problems afford challenging opportunities for 
thesis research and classroom instruction. Current topics 
of interest are: atomic physics, a wide variety of problems 
in plasma physics, statistical mechanics of physical and 
living systems, physics of the upper atmosphere and mag- 
netosphere, fluid dynamics, physical oceanography, var- 
ious aspects of space and planetary science, theoretical 
and applied numerical analysis, control theory, epidemi- 
ology and biomathematics, chemical processes induced 
by ionizing radiation, and the history of science. They also 
include analysis of a number of current problems of soci- 
ety such as mathematical models applied to public health. 
Courses and thesis research guidance by the faculty of 



8 / General Information 



the Institute are provided through the graduate programs 
in the academic departments of the Division of Mathemat- 
ical and Physical Sciences and Engineering. The Institute 
sponsors a wide variety of seminars. Of principal interest 
are general seminars in plasma physics, applied mathe- 
matics, fluid dynamics, and in atomic and molecular phys- 
ics. Information about these can be obtained by writing 
the Director or by calling (301) 454-2636. 

Institute for Urban Studies: Director: Thomas P. Murphy. 
The Institute aims at developing students knowledgeable 
both in the technical competencies which constitute the 
skills of "urban manpower" and in the professional under- 
standing of the urban community as an object of interdis- 
ciplinary analysis. 

The Institute for Urban Studies is a multi-campus inter- 
disciplinary B.A. and M.A. degree granting program. It was 
created to offer a teaching program to educate urban ad- 
ministrators and specialists to manage existing communi- 
ties as well as to plan the development of new ones. The 
Washington-Baltimore urban corridor provides an excel- 
lent teaching and research setting for faculty and stu- 
dents. Since contemporary urban problems must be 
solved by a multi-disciplinary approach, the master's 
program supplements the Institute core courses with the 
specialized problem solving methods of the diverse de- 
partments and professional schools of the University. 

Center on Aging: Director: Jody K. Olsen. The Center on 
Aging, focuses its efforts on stimulating interest in aging 
within existing departments, colleges, and schools 
throughout the University through research and teaching. 
In addition, it has developed and maintains contact with 
students in the general field of gerontology and helps 
them to devise educational programs to meet their goals. 
The Center sponsors an ongoing colloquium series on 
aging and community training programs based primarily 
on psychosocial needs of the elderly. In conjunction with 
participating departments and schools, the Center offers 
a certificate of concentration at the master's degree level, 
which requires, in addition to formal coursework, a prac- 
ticum experience in aging. 

Center of IVIaterials Research: Director: Robert L. Park. 
The Center is an interdepartmental organization engaged 
in graduate research and education in materials science 
and engineering. Research is presently focused in the 
areas of phase transitions, metals and alloys, and sur- 
faces and interfaces. These programs are under constant 
review to ensure that the Center remains responsive to 
changing state and national needs. To support these pro- 
grams, the Center maintains central research facilities 
including electron microscopy, x-ray analysis, and 
spectroscopy. 

Computer Science Center; Director: John P. Menard. The 
Computer Science Center provides the academic com- 
munity of the University with ready access to large-scale 
computer facilities. The Center's primary function is the 
effective operation, maintenance, and management of 
these facilities so as to provide, as nearly as possible, 
uninterrupted computer services to the University com- 
munity. The Center also carries on an active program of 
basic and applied research in computer science. 
Graduate students and faculty with programming pro- 



blems can bring them to a group of programmer consul- 
tants who work on an individualized basis to assist in 
applying appropriate computer techniques. The Center 
also has a staff of systems analysts to assist in debug- 
ging programs, to adapt software developed elsewhere to 
use the Center's equipment, and to devise original soft- 
ware to meet user needs. There is a well-stocked program 
library, keypunch and digitek services are available, and 
the Center offers several non-credit short courses for new 
users or those with specialized needs. 

The Center's basic hardware consists of a UNIVAC 1108 
Shared Processor System and a UNIVAC 1 100/41 system, 
along with other associated hardware. Two terminal 
rooms and two keypunch areas with reproducer, interpret- 
er and lister are maintained in the Computer Science Cen- 
ter. Terminals owned or leased by other departments can 
also access the Center's large-scale equipment. 

Transportation Studies Center: Director: Everett C. Carter. 
Housed in the Division of Mathematical and Physical Sci- 
ences and Engineering, the Center acts as a catalyst to 
foster research and development and interdisciplinary 
studies in transportation and to provide the means for 
investigators from different disciplines to work together 
on a wide range of transportation related problems. Objec- 
tives of the Center are to identify potential research proj- 
ects by establishing a dialogue and rapport with spon- 
soring agencies and offices; to provide coordination be- 
tween the various disciplines engaged in or having poten- 
tial to engage in transportation research and between 
potential research sponsors and University researchers; to 
facilitate cooperation between the University of Maryland 
and other universities and industry, for joint undertakings; 
to promote and, where appropriate, to supervise specific 
educational programs of an interdisciplinary nature. 

Among the areas identified as having interest and re- 
search potential are transportation systems management, 
transportation planning, public policy, public utilities, sys- 
tems economics, multiple uses of rights-of-way, mass 
transit systems, conservation of energy, terminal siting, 
bridge and pavement design, traffic flow coordination, 
traffic safety and efficiency, transportation economics, 
aerospace transportation, meteorological factors, noise 
control; highway landscaping, environmental considera- 
tions, and air, rail, water and highway alternatives. 

Water Resources Research Center: Coordinator: Robert L 
Green. The Water Resources Research Center sponsors 
and coordinates research on all aspects of water supply, 
demand, distribution, utilization, quality enhancement or 
degradation, and allocation or management. A committee 
of water resource research information users including 
representatives from management, planning and regula- 
tory federal, state and local governments and citizens 
groups has been formed to advise on research needs of 
Maryland. Basic funding is from the annual allotment of 
the Water Resources Research Act of 1964 as amended. 
The Center also assists faculty members in developing 
matching fund proposals and in seeking other research 
funds. Currently, there are twelve research projects in 
progress in five different departments, including one in 
UMCEES and two at UMBO. 

Bureau of Educational Research and Field Services: Direc- 



General Information / 9 



tor: Marjorie H. Gardner. The Bureau of Educational Re- 
search and Field Services was established to serve in a 
consultative capacity in implementing research designs 
of faculty members, graduate students and public school 
systems. It acts as a coordinating agency between the 
University and public school systems for both research 
and field services. The Bureau also serves as a source of 
information and assistance regarding federal and non- 
federal research support that is available. 

Bureau of Governmental Research: Acting Director: Davis 
B. Bobrow. The Bureau engages in research about Mary- 
land state and local government with a central focus on 
urban affairs. It also makes numerous administrative stud- 
ies at the request of county and municipal governments. 

Consortia 

The University of Maryland is a member of a number of 
national and local consortia concerned with advanced ed- 
ucation and research. They offer a variety of opportunities 
for senior scholar and graduate student research. 

OAK RIDGE ASSOCIATED UNIVERSITIES, INC. (ORAU), 
is a non-profit educational and research corporation 
formed in order to broaden the opportunities for member 
institutions collectively to participate in many fields of ed- 
ucation and research in the natural sciences related to 
nuclear energy. Educational programs range from short 
term courses or institutes, conducted with ORAU facili- 
ties and staff, to fellowship programs administered by 
ORAU for the Atomic Energy Commission. 

The National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), 
in Boulder, Colorado, was created in 1960 to serve as a 
focal point of a vigorous and expanding national research 
effort in the atmospheric sciences. NCAR is operated 
under the sponsorship of the National Science Founda- 
tion by the UNIVERSITY CORPORATION FOR ATMO- 
SPHERIC RESEARCH (UCAR), made up of 44 U.S. and 
Canadian universities with graduate programs in the at- 
mospheric sciences or related fields. The scientific staff 
includes meteorologists, astronomers, chemists, 
physicists, mathematicians, and representatives of other 
disciplines. 

UNIVERSITIES RESEARCH ASSOCIATION (URA), a 
group of 52 universities engaged in high energy research, 
is the sponsoring organization for the National Accelera- 
tor Laboratory, funded by the U.S. Atomic Energy Com- 
mission. The accelerator, located near Batavia, Illinois, is 
the world's highest energy machine. 

The INTER-UNIVERSITY COMMUNICATIONS COUNCIL 
(EDUCOM) provides a forum for the appraisal of the cur- 
rent state of the art in communications science and tech- 
nology and their relation to the planning and programs of 
colleges and universities. The council particularly fosters 
inter-university cooperation in the area of communica- 
tions science. 

The UNIVERSITIES SPACE RESEARCH ASSOCIATION 
(USRA) was designed to promote cooperation between 
universities, research organizations, and the government 
in the development of space science and technology, and 
in the operation of laboratories and facilities for re- 
search, development, and education in these fields. 

The University of Maryland is a member of the INTER- 
UNIVERSITY CONSORTIUM FOR POLITICAL SCIENCE 



RESEARCH. One purpose of the Consortium is to facili- 
tate collection and distribution of useful data for social 
science research. The data include survey data from the 
University of Michigan Survey Research Center and from 
studies conducted by other organizations or by individ- 
uals, census data for the United States, election data, leg- 
islative roll calls, judicial decision results, and biograph- 
ical data. 

The 2400-acre waterfront CHESAPEAKE BAY CENTER 
FOR ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES (CBCES), is dedicated 
to preserving and enhancing the quality of man's environ- 
ment through programs of ecological study and educa- 
tion. Located on the western shore of the Chesapeake 
Bay, just south of Annapolis, it presents a wide selection 
of local eco-systems. Scientific programs of the Center, 
a major component of the Smithsonian Institution, are 
guided by the consortium in which the University of Mary- 
land participates. The unique ecological environment pro- 
vided by the Center furnishes an attractive site for grad- 
uate student research programs. 

The University of Maryland jointly participates In the 
CHESAPEAKE RESEARCH CONSORTIUM, INC., a wide 
scale environmental research program, with the Johns 
Hopkins University, the Virginia Institute of Marine Sci- 
ence, and the Smithsonian Institution. The Consortium, 
originally funded by a 1.2 million dollar grant from the 
National Science Foundation in 1971, coordinates and in- 
tegrates research on the Chesapeake Bay region and is 
compiling a vast amount of scientific data to assist in the 
management and control of the area. Each participating 
institution calls on faculty expertise in a diversity of disci- 
plines including biology, chemistry, physics, engineering, 
geology, and the social and behavioral sciences. Through 
this interdisciplinary research program a computerized 
Management Resource Bank is being developed contain- 
ing a biological inventory of the Chesapeake Bay region, 
a legal survey, and socioeconomic data of the surrounding 
communities. The Consortium provides research opportu- 
nities for faculty members, graduate students, and under- 
graduate students at the University. 

Officially chartered in 1969, the ASSOCIATION OF SEA 
GRANT PROGRAM INSTITUTIONS is a growing organiza- 
tion concerned with the development and wise use of 
ocean and Great Lakes resources. Composed of the na- 
tion's major colleges, universities and institutions with 
ocean programs, the Association works for the betterment 
of the management and utilization of marine resources. 
Members represent almost half of the universities and 
colleges in the U.S. that offer marine related degrees. The 
Association's goals are to further the development, use, 
and conservation of marine and coastal resources, and to 
encourage increased accomplishments and initiatives in 
related areas; to increase the effectiveness of member 
institutions in their work on marine and coastal resources; 
and to stimulate cooperation and unity of effort among 
members. 

The 20-member MIDDLE ATLANTIC CONSORTIUM ON 
AIR POLLUTION (MACAP) was established in 1971 pri- 
marily as an educational effort in the area of air pollution, 
on a grant from the Environmental Protection Agency. 
Originally designed to administer training grant programs, 
the Consortium also sponsors short courses, confer- 
ences, telecom seminars, and symposia, including a re- 



10 / General Information 



cent one in West Virginia which was run for and by grad- 
uate students. For the telecom series of seminars, experts 
in specific fields prepare video tapes which are copied 
and distributed to participating institutions for viewing by 
their students and guests from government and industry. 
After all participants have viewed the tape, a conference 
call is placed to the speaker allowing for a general discus- 
sion and question/answer session. 

Established in 1965, the UNIVERSITIES COUNCIL ON 
WATER RESOURCES (UCOWR), is a national consortium 
with approximately 80 members. UCOWR was created to 
provide a forum for interchange of information pertaining 
to water resources research in academic communities. 
Member institutions also exchange information on special 
conferences, seminars, symposia and graduate study 
opportunities. 

The NATIONAL CRIMINAL JUSTICE EDUCATIONAL 
CONSORTIUM was formed in November 1973 under fund- 
ing from the Law Enforcement Assistance Administration 
of the U.S. Department of Justice. The University of Mary- 
land is one of seven universities selected to participate. 
Among the stated goals of the consortium are the devel- 
oping and strengthening of graduate programs in criminal 
justice or directly related studies at the doctoral level and 
the building of a framework for cooperation and the ex- 
change of knowledge among affiliated universities. 

The University of Maryland is an associate member of 
the UNIVERSITY-NATIONAL OCEANOGRAPHIC LABORA- 
TORY SYSTEM (UNOLS) established to improve coordi- 
nated use of federally supported oceanographic facilities, 
bringing together the Community of Academic Ocean- 
ographic Institutions which operate those facilities, and 
creating a mechanism for such coordinated utilization of 
and planning for oceanographic facilities. As an associate 
member, the University of Maryland has a very active grad- 
uate level research program in the marine sciences and 
operates facilities through the Chesapeake Bay Center for 
Environmental Studies. 



Fees and Expenses 

Payment of Fees 

All Students Who Pre-Register Incur a Financial Obliga- 
tion to the University. Those students who pre-register 
and subsequently decide not to attend must notify the 
Registration Office, Room1130A, North Administration 
Building, in writing, prior to the first day of classes. If 
this office has not received a request for cancellation by 
4:30 p.m. of the last day before classes begin, the Univer- 
sity will assume that the student plans to attend and ac- 
cepts his financial obligation. 

After classes begin, students who wish to terminate 
their registration must follow the withdrawal procedures 
and are liable for charges applicable at the time of with- 
drawal. 

State of Maryland legislation has established a State Cen- 
tral Collections Unit, and in accordance with State law the 
University is required to turn over all deliquent accounts 
to that office for collection and legal follow-up. Delin- 
quent accounts are automatically identified and collected 
on a monthly basis by computer readout. 



Graduate Fees* 

Application fee 

This fee is not refundable $15.00 

Tuition Per Credit Hour: 

Resident Student $50.00 

Non-Resident Student $85.00 

Students admitted to the Graduate 
School must pay graduate tuition fees 
whether or not the credit will be used to 
satisfy program requirements. A grad- 
uate student who wishes to audit a course 
must pay the usual graduate tuition. 

Continuous Registration Fee $10.00 

Registration Fee $ 5.00 

Recreation Fee 

(Summer School Only) $ 4.00 

Vehicle Registration Fee $12.00 

Graduation Fee, 

Master's Degree $15.00 

Graduation Fee, 

Doctor's Degree $60.00 

Health Fee (Per Semester) $ 5.00 

(Part-time Student) 

Health Fee (Per Semester) $10.00 

(Full-time Student) 

*The fees listed here are those charged at the time this Catalog 
went to press and are offered as a general guide. They are sub- 
ject to change. Fees charged in a particular semester are pub- 
lished in the Schedule of Classes for that semester. 



Determination of In-State Status 
for Admission, Tuition and 
Charge-Differential Purposes 

The Board of Regents of the University of Maryland ap- 
proved new regulations for the determination of in-state 
status for admission, tuition and charge-differential pur- 
poses at its meeting on September 21, 1973. The new 
regulations became effective with the January 1974 term. 

An initial determination of in-state status for admission, 
tuition and charge-differential purposes will be made by 
the University at the time a student's application for ad- 
mission is under consideration. The determination made 
at that time, and any determination made thereafter shall 
prevail in each semester until the determination is suc- 
cessfully challenged. The deadline for meeting all require- 
ments for an in-state status and for submitting all docu- 
ments for reclassification is ttie last day of late registra- 
tion for tfie semester the student wishes to be classified 
as an in-state student. 

The volume of requests for reclassification may neces- 
sitate a delay in completing the review process. It is 
hoped that a decision in each case will be made within 
ninety (90) days of a request for determination. During this 
period of time, or any further period of time reauired by 
the University, fees and charges based on the previous 
determination must be paid. If the determination is 
changed, any excess fees and charges will be refunded. 

Persons who are interested in obtaining a copy of the 
regulations or who wish assistance with their classifica- 
tion should contact: The Graduate School Office of Grad- 
uate Records, Room 2117, South Administration Building, 
University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742— 
phone (301) 454-5428. 



General Information / 1 1 



Financial Assistance 

The University of Maryland recognizes the high cost of ed- 
ucation today and makes every effort to offer financial 
assistance to qualified students through a variety of pro- 
grams. Approximately one-half of all full-time graduate 
students receive financial support, which includes remis- 
sion of tuition fees, through teaching and research assis- 
tantships and University and state fellowships. In addi- 
tion, education loans are available through the University 
at very reasonable terms, and short-term, interest-free 
emergency loans may be obtained if needed. Referrals for 
on-campus or area employment opportunities for students 
and students' spouses are also available in various depart- 
ments and in specific student service centers on campus. 

Fellowships 

A fellowship is an award bestowed on a student who dis- 
plays academic merit and promise to assist him in de- 
voting full time to scholarly pursuits. All applicants for 
fellowships must be admitted to the Graduate School on a 
full-time basis to be eligible. Inquiries and requests for 
appropriate forms should be directed to the Fellowships 
and Finance Office, Room 2126, South Administration 
Building, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 
20742. 

The Maryland Fellowship Program, established by the 
State Legislature and administered by the Graduate 
School, provides a limited number of fellowships to quali- 
fied applicants who are enrolled in doctoral programs and 
who agree to teach in a public institution of higher learn- 
ing in the State of Maryland for a period of three years 
following receipt of their doctoral degree, if a suitable 
position is offered. The stipend is $2,500 for the academic 
year, with remission of tuition. Although renewable an- 
nually, these fellowships normally carry a three year non- 
renewable tenure. Deadline for the application, which is 
available from the Fellowship Office of the Graduate 
School, is February 15. 

The Graduate School Fellowships are awarded annually 
on a competitive basis. The stipend is $1,000 for the aca- 
demic year, with remission of tuition. The standard appli- 
cation for financial aid will serve as an application for this 
fellowship program and must be submitted by February 1. 
Awards are based upon the recommendation of the 
department chairman. 

Graduate Fellowships for Other Races have been estab- 
lished to provide financial assistance to qualified grad- 
uate students who meet the following criteria: 1. The 
applicant must be a member of a minority race as defined 
by the racial composition of the College Park Campus 
graduate student body. 2. The applicant must be a legal 
resident of Maryland. 3. The applicant must be admitted 
as a full-time graduate student in a degree program. 4. The 
applicant must be a first-time graduate student. 5. The ap- 
plicant must be able to demonstrate financial need as 
determined by the College Park Graduate School. The in- 
dividual fellowship shall not exceed $1,000 plus waiver of 
tuition, and a student may apply for reappointment on a 
yearly basis. Additional details and application materials 
are available from the Fellowships and Finance Office of 
the Graduate School. 

12 / General Information 



Assistantships 

Offers of assistantships are made contingent upon the 
applicant's acceptance as a graduate student by the Grad- 
uate School. 

Graduate Teaching Assistantships are available to quali- 
fied graduate students in many departments and pro- 
grams. In addition to remission of tuition, these carry 
ten-month stipends ranging from $3,800 to $4,750. Appli- 
cations for assistantships should be made directly to the 
department in which the applicant will study. 
Graduate Research Assistantships, with comparable sti- 
pends, are available in some departments on a ten or 
twelve month basis. For information inquire in the individ- 
ual department or program. 

Resident Graduate Assistantships, in limited number, are 
also available. The stipend is $3,800 per year, plus remis- 
sion of tuition, in exchange for part-time work In under- 
graduate residence halls as Residence Halls staff mem- 
bers. These Resident Assistantships are open to both 
men and women. Applications for a Resident Graduate As- 
sistantship should be made to the Director of Resident 
Life, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742. 

Loans and Part-Time Employment 

National Direct Student Loan Funds are available to grad- 
uate students of the University of Maryland. Applicants 
must be United States nationals (citizens and permanent 
resident status). Loans are approved based upon financial 
need; the average loan is $1,500 per year. Repayment 
begins nine months after the borrower leaves school, and 
no interest is charged until the beginning of the repay- 
ment schedule. Interest after that date is charged at the 
rate of three per cent per annum. Repayment of the loan, 
including interest, is deferred during the time the borrower 
may be in military service, the Peace Corps, VISTA, and 
ACTION, up to a period of three years as well as during 
time of continued study on at least a half-time basis. 
Applications should be directed to the Director, Office of 
Student Aid, North Administration Building, University of 
Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742, by May 1 for the 
fall semester. 

Guaranteed Student Loan programs which have been 
established for State of Maryland residents through the 
Maryland Higher Education Loan Corporation, permit stu- 
dents to borrow money from their hometown banks or 
other local financial institutions. Graduate students in 
good standing may borrow up to $5,000 per year, but state 
agencies and individual banks may set their own limits up 
to this amount. Notes may not bear more than seven per- 
cent simple interest. Monthly repayments begin ten 
months after graduation or withdrawal from school. The 
federal government will pay the interest for eligible stu- 
dents while the student is in school. Further details re- 
garding this program for Maryland residents may be se- 
cured from the Office of Student Aid. For prospective 
non-Maryland borrowers unable to obtain information con- 
cerning the particular loan programs of their states, the 
Office of Student Aid can provide necessary information. 

Student Emergency Loans are available, in case a student 
has a financial emergency, from the Office of Student Aid. 



If the funds have not been depleted, students may borrow 
with no interest up to $75.00 ($300.00 if the student spec- 
ifies that the loan is to help pay registration debts). Emer- 
gency loans must be repaid within one semester. 

AAUW Loan: The College Park Maryland Branch of the 
American Association of University Women has estab- 
lished a small AAUW loan fund for graduate women stu- 
dents at the University of Maryland. The amount loaned 
will be based on need and on the amount of funds 
available. Repayment of the loan shall begin within one 
year of leaving the University, and the note will carry 4 per 
cent per annum simple interest to be charged on the un- 
paid balance, beginning when the borrower leaves the 
University. For information and application forms, please 
contact the Fellowship and Finance Office in the 
Graduate School. 

The Office of Student Aid, located in the North Adminis- 
tration Building, serves without charge as a clearinghouse 
for students seeking part-time work and employers seek- 
ing help. Many jobs are available in the residence halls, 
libraries, laboratories, and elsewhere on and off campus. 
All full-time students seeking work are welcome to visit 
the office and consult referral lists. 
Worl(-Study Program. The University has in operation a 
College Work-Study Program provided under Title 1-C of 
the Economic Opportunity Act of 1964 and subsequent 
amendments. 

The purpose of the College Work-Study Program is to 
expand part-time employment opportunities for students 
who are in need of the earnings from part-time employ- 
ment in order to continue their education. Preference is 
given to students with the greatest financial need. 

Employment under the College Work-Study Program is 
available to a student who meets the following qualifica- 
tions: (1) is in need of employment in order to pursue a 
course of study at this University; (2) is capable of main- 
taining good standing in the course of study while em- 
ployed; (3) is a citizen of the United States or a permanent 
resident; (4) is enrolled or has been accepted for enroll- 
ment as either an undergraduate, graduate, or profession- 
al student on a full-time basis. 

Students employed through the College Work-Study 
Program are assigned to most of the departments on 
campus and to a few departments off-campus. Students 
may be employed up to 40 hours per week during the sum- 
mer, semester break, and Spring holidays. During the 
school year, to include examination week, students may 
work up to 15 hours per week. Minimum pay is $3.50 per 
hour during this school year. 

Additional information may be obtained from the Office 
of Student Aid, Student Employment Section, located in 
Room 2114, North Administration Building. Telephone: 
454-4592. 

Veterans Benefits 

Recent federal legislation has had significant impact on 
the veteran-graduate student. People who originally were 
entitled to 36 months of V.A. Educational Benefits now 
have a total of 45 months of educational benefits. The 
new complement of benefits can be used for graduate 
work. 



See the Veterans Section of the current Schedule of 
Classes for other current information. 

Veterans Administration counselors work on campus 
full-time to assist veterans, their dependents, and service- 
men with all V.A. related questions and problems. These 
representatives can offer you help in getting your monthly 
educational assistance checks, as well as other less 
known but available benefits. Some of these are compen- 
sation for service connected disabilities, guaranteed 
home loans, and vocational rehabilitation services for dis- 
abled veterans. 

Related information, such as facts on individual state 
bonuses, removal of derogatory SPN codes from your mil- 
itary discharge {DD214), and University of Maryland Veter- 
ans Club activities, is also available. 

The counselors are available on a walk-in-basis during 
normal office hours in Room 1130 or 2108 North Adminis- 
tration Building. Telephone 454-5276 or 454-5734. 

Student Services 

Housing 

There is no on-campus housing provided for unmarried 
graduate students. The Off-Campus Housing Office 
(Room 121 1H, Student Union, 454-3645), in cooperation 
with many of the local landlords and apartment managers, 
maintains an extensive and up-to-date list of vacancies 
under several headings (Rooms, Unfurnished Apartments, 
Houses to Share, etc.). This office can also provide stu- 
dents with convenient maps of the College Park area and 
with lists of local motels, trailer and mobile home parks, 
real estate agents, and furniture rental companies. 

Current rates for housing in the area are about $85-$125 
per month for a room in a private home, $175-$250 per 
month for an efficiency or one bedroom apartment; $250/ 
month for a furnished apartment, $90-130/month for 
shared apartment, and $300-$350/month for a two-bed- 
room house. 

The University itself maintains two apartment com- 
plexes for married graduate students and for a limited 
number of single graduate students. Both Lord Calvert 
Apartments and University Hills Apartments are within 
walking distance of campus, which means that there is 
usually a waiting list, especially during the period immedi- 
ately preceding the fall semester. Priority for housing in 
these complexes is currently given to married full- 
time graduate assistants, then married full-time graduate 
non-assistants. 

Rent for a one-bedroom apartment is $135-$148/month, 
with two-bedroom apartments costing about fifteen 
dollars more; a limited number of efficiencies are avail- 
able to single students for a slightly lower monthly rent. 
Students must sign a one year lease and pay a security 
deposit of $50 (payable when the applicant's name is 
added to the waiting list). There is a nonrefundable appli- 
cation fee of $10 for adding a name to the waiting list. 
After the initial lease expires, residence in the apartments 
is on a monthly basis. Graduate students who maintain 
full-time status are permitted to live in the apartments for 
a maximum of five years. 

Information and applications for University-owned 
housing can be obtained from the Rental Office, 3424 
Tulane Drive, Hyattsville, Maryland 20783 (422-7445). 



General Information / 13 



University Food Services 

The University Food Service offers tliree dining contract 
options which are available to graduate students. One 
plan offers the diner 19 meals per v^feek, the second offers 
any 15 per weel<, and the third offers the choice of any 10 
meals per vk^eek. The 1976-1977 cost of contract dining 
plans ranged from $330 to $380 per semester. University 
affiliated people can obtain guest meal tickets for individ- 
ual meals in contract dining halls for fairly reasonable 
prices (unlimited quantities for $1.65 at breakfast, $2.00 at 
lunch, and $2.50 at dinner). More information about con- 
tract dining can be obtained from Mr. John Goecker (454- 
2901). 

In addition to the services offered by the contract 
dining halls, graduate students may wish to take advan- 
tage of the cash line services available at the Hill Dining 
Hall or the various restaurants and snack bars at the Stu- 
dent Union. 

Hillel Kosher Dining Club, housed in Hillel House, 7505 
Yale Avenue, College Park (277-8961), provides Kosher 
meals on either a regular or occasional basis. 

Career Development Center 

The Career Development Center, located in Terrapin Hall, 
offers a wide variety of services to graduate students. The 
goal of the Center is to assist students in exploring career 
opportunities and planning their careers. Services include 
career advising, the Career Library, the credentials ser- 
vice, and the on-campus interview program. 

The career advising program includes both individual 
and group advising sessions and workshops on job- 
seeking skills, resume preparation, and interviewing 
skills. The Career Library contains occupational informa- 
tion, full-time job listings, employer directories, and other 
reference sources. 

Graduate students are eligible to participate in the on- 
campus interview program, which involves campus visits 
by representatives from business, government, and educa- 
tion. Students interested in employment in the fields of 
education and library science will find the credentials 
service especially valuable. 

Certain services of the Center are also available to stu- 
dents' spouses. 

Counseling Center 

The Counseling Center offers consultation on educa- 
tion/psychological concerns; an open educational-voca- 
tional information library; recorded interviews with 
department heads on the characteristics of graduate 
majors offered on the campus; and a weekly Research and 
Data series of presentations on current educational/ 
psychological topics. 

Available services include the following: the Counseling 
Service, which offers initial consultation on any problems 
and provides further counseling services or referral ser- 
vices to appropriate individuals or agencies in the area; 
the Reading and Study Skills Laboratory, for those inter- 
ested in improving any of their educational skills; the 
Parent Consultation and Child Evaluation Service, pro- 
viding a variety of services to the parents of young chil- 
dren with learning or behavior problems; and the Testing, 



Research and Data Processing Division, which serves as 
the testing and census taking arm of the campus. 

The Center provides consultation to a variety of groups 
and individuals concerning organizational development 
and group productivity. Other programs include a series 
of self-understanding and development groups for inter- 
ested students and staff. 

The Center provides a wide variety of research reports 
on characteristics of students and campus environment. 

National testing programs (GRE, Miller Analogies, etc.) 
are administered by the Counseling Center as well as 
testing for counseling purposes. Office location: Shoe- 
maker Building. Telephone: Counseling Services 454-2931; 
Reading and Study Skills Lab 454-2935. 

Health Care 

The University Health Center is located on Campus Drive 
directly across from the Student Union. Both graduate and 
undergraduate students are eligible for health care at the 
Health Center. Services provided include both emergency 
and routine medical care, mental health evaluation and 
treatment, health education, laboratory, x-ray, gynecolog- 
ical services, and upon referral from a Health Center 
physician, dermatological services and orthopedic 
services. 

Students requiring service should call the Health Cen- 
ter for an appointment. Students who are injured or are 
too ill to wait for an appointment will be seen on a walk-in 
basis. Emergencies always receive highest priority. 

The Health Center is open 8:00 a.m. -10:00 p.m. week- 
days and 11 :00 a.m. -3:00 p.m. on weekends with acute 
illnesses taking priority on evenings and weekends. Emer- 
gencies are seen 24 hours a day. 

Upon payment of the health fee at registration, a stu- 
dent becomes eligible for routine medical care and pro- 
fessional services at the Health Center. Charges however, 
are made for certain laboratory tests, all x-rays, casts and 
allergy injections. It should be noted that the mandatory 
health fee is not a form of health insurance. For informa- 
tion and emergencies, call 454-3444; Appointments, 454- 
4923; Mental Health, 454-4925; Women's Health, 454-4921; 
Health Education, 454-4922. 

Health Insurance 

Because the mandatory health fee is not a form of health 
insurance and many students do not have adequate 
coverage, a voluntary group insurance policy is available 
to students. This policy provides benefits, at very reason- 
able rates, for hospital, surgery, emergency, laboratory, 
and x-ray purposes; some coverage for mental and ner- 
vous problems; and contains a major hospital provision. 
Students may enroll at mid-year for a half-yearly rate, and 
they may elect to have family coverage. Enrollment for the 
policy is open at the beginning of each semester. For 
additional information and application forms, see the 
brochure available in the Health Center or in the Office of 
Student Affairs. 

Publications of Interest to Graduate 
Students 

In addition to.the Catalog and Bulletin, the Graduate 



14 / General Information 



School prepares the following publications: 
Guide to Graduate Life. This handbook, designed to pro- 
vide the new graduate student with an introduction to the 
campus and the College Park area, is available from the 
office of the Dean tor Graduate Studies. 
Important Dates for Advisors and Students. This calendar 
card of dates for submission of final documents is avail- 
able from the various departmental graduate offices, as 
well as from the office of the Dean for Graduate Studies. 
Graduate Student Academic Handbook. This manual con- 
tains the instructions for preparation of theses and dis- 
sertations and is available at a nominal cost from the Uni- 
versity book store. 

Graduate Assistant Policy Manual and Handbook. This 
handbook sets forth policies, procedures, and services of 
interest to graduate assistants and is available from the 
departmental graduate offices and the office of the Dean 
for Graduate Studies. 



Student Data Information 

Policy of the University of Maryland on 
Access to and Release of Student Data/ 
Information 

General Statement. The University of Maryland has the re- 
sponsibility for effectively supervising any access to and/ 
or release of official data/information about its students. 
Certain items of information about individual students are 
fundamental to the educational process and must be re- 
corded. This recorded information concerning students 
must be used only for clearly-defined purposes, must be 
safeguarded and controlled to avoid violations of personal 
privacy, and must be appropriately disposed of when the 
justification for its collection and retention no longer 
exists. 

In this regard, the University is committed to protecting 
to the maximum extent possible the right of privacy of all 
individuals about whom it holds information, records and 
files. Access to and release of such records is restricted 
to the student concerned, to others with the student's 
written consent, to officials within the University, to a 
court of competent jurisdiction and otherwise pursuant to 
law. 

Access. All official information collected and maintained 
in the University identifiable with an individual student will 
be made available for inspection and review at the written 
request of that student subject to certain exceptions. 

For purposes of access to records at the University of 
tVlaryland, a student enrolled (or formerly enrolled) for 
academic credit or audit at any campus of the University 
shall have access to official records concerning him on 
any campus on which he is or has been enrolled. 

The personal files of members of the faculty and staff 
which concern students, including private correspon- 
dence, and notes which refer to students, are not regard- 
ed as official records of the University. This includes 
notes intended for the personal use of the faculty and 
never intended to be official records of the University. 

A request for general access to all official records, files 



and data maintained by a campus, must be made in writ- 
ing to the coordinator of records or to other person(s) as 
designated by the chancellor at that particular campus. A 
request for access to official data maintained in a particu- 
lar office may be made to the administrative head of that 
office. 

When a student (or former student) appears at a given 
office and requests access to the University records about 
himself. 

1. The student must provide proper identification veri- 
fying that he is the person whose record is being 
accessed. 

2. The designated staff person(s) must supervise the re- 
view of the contents of the record with the student. 

3. Inspection and review shall be permitted within a 
period not to exceed 45 days from the date of the 
student's request. 

4. The student will be free to make notes concerning 
the contents but no material will be removed from 
the record at the time. 

Under normal circumstances, the student is entitled to 
receive a copy only of his permanent academic record. A 
reasonable administrative fee may be charged for provid- 
ing copies of this or other items. 

Record keeping personnel and members of the faculty 
and. staff with administrative assignment may have access 
to records and files for internal educational purposes as 
well as for routinely necessary clerical, administrative and 
statistical purposes as required by the duties of their jobs. 
The name and position of the official responsible for the 
maintenance of each type of educational record may be 
obtained from the coordinator of records or other person 
appointed by the chancellor on each campus. 

Any other access allowed by law must be recorded 
showing the legitimate educational or other purpose and 
the signature of the person gaining access. The student 
concerned shall be entitled to review this information. 
Release of Information. Except with the prior written con- 
sent of the student (or former student) concerned, or as 
required by federal and state law, no information in any 
student file may be released to any individual (including 
parents, spouse, or other students) or organization with 
the exception of information defined as "Public Informa- 
tion." 

When disclosure of any personally identifiable data/in- 
formation from University records about a student is de- 
manded pursuant to court order or lawfully issued sub- 
poena, the staff member receiving such order shall 
immediately notify the student concerned in writing prior 
to compliance with such order or subpoena. 

Data/information from University records about stu- 
dents will be released tor approved research purposes 
only if the identity of the student involved is fully 
protected. 

A record will be kept of all such releases. 

Information from University records may be released to 
appropriate persons in connection with an emergency if 
the knowledge of such information is necessary to protect 
the health or safety of a student or other persons. 

Public Information. The following items are considered 
public data/information and may be disclosed by the Uni- 
versity in response to inquiries concerning individual stu- 



General Information / 15 



dents, whether the inquiries are in person, In writing or 
overihe telephone. 

1. Name 

2. Affirmation of whether currently enrolled 

3. Campus location 

Unless the student has officially filed a request with the 
campus registrar that disclosure not be made without his 
written permission, the following items in addition to 
those above are considered public information and may 
be included in appropriate University/campus directories 
and publications and may be disclosed by designated 
staff members in each campus in response to inquiries 
concerning individual students, whether the inquiries are 
in person, in writing, or over the telephone. 

1. School, college, department, major or division 

2. Dates of enrollment 

3. Degrees received 

4. Honors received 

5. Local address and phone number 

6. Home address (permanent) 

7. Participation in officially recognized activities and 
sports 

8. Weight and height of members of athletic teams 
The release of public information as described above 

may be limited by an individual campus policy. 

Letters of AppraisaL Candid appraisals and evaluations of 
performance and potential are an essential part of the ed- 
ucational process. Clearly, the provision of such informa- 
tion to prospective employers, to other educational 
Institutions, or to other legitimately concerned outside in- 
dividuals and agencies is necessary and in the interest of 
the particular student. 

Data/information which was part of University records 
prior to January 1, 1975 and which was collected and 
maintained as confidential information, will not be dis- 
closed to students. Should a student desire access to a 
confidential letter of appraisal received prior to January 1, 
1975, the student shall be advised to have the writer of 
that appraisal notify, in writing, the concerned records 
custodian of the decision as to whether or not the writer 
is willing to have the appraisal made available for the stu- 
dent's review. Unless a written response is received ap- 
proving a change of status in the letter, the treatment of 
the letter as a confidential document shall continue. 

Documents of appraisal relating to students collected 
by the University or any department or office of the Univer- 
sity on or after January 1, 1975, will be maintained confi- 
dentially only if a waiver of the right of access has been 
executed by the student. In the absence of such a waiver, 
all such documents will be available for student inspec- 
tion and review. 

All references, recommendations, evaluations and other 
written notations or comments, originated prior to Jan- 
uary 1, 1975, where the author by reason of custom, 
common practice, or specific assurance thought or had 
good reason to believe that such documents and mate- 
rials would be confidential, will be maintained as confi- 
dential, unless the author consents in writing to waive 
such confidentiality. 

If a student files a written waiver with the department 
or office concerned, letters of appraisal received pursuant 



to that waiver will be maintained confidentially. Forms will 
be available for this purpose. 

Challenges to the Record. Every student shall have the op- 
portunity to challenge any item in his file which he consid- 
ers to be inaccurate, misleading or otherwise inappropri- 
ate data. A student shall initiate a challenge by submitting 
a request in writing for the deletion or correction of the 
particular item. The request shall be made to the custo- 
dian of the particular record in question. 

If the custodian and the student involved are unable to 
resolve the matter to the satisfaction of both parties, the 
written request for deletion or correction shall be submit- 
ted by the student to the coordinator of records, or other 
such person as designated by the chancellor, who shall 
serve as the hearing officer. The student shall be given the 
opportunity for a hearing, at which the student may pre- 
sent oral or written justification for the request for dele- 
tion or correction. The hearing officer may obtain such 
other information as he deems appropriate for use in the 
hearing and shall give the student a written decision on 
the matter within thirty (30) days from the conclusion of 
the hearing. If the decision of the hearing officer is to 
deny the deletion or correction of an item in the student's 
file, the student shall be entitled to submit a written state- 
ment to the hearing officer presenting his position with 
regard to the item. Both the written decision of the hear- 
ing officer and the statement submitted by the student 
shall be inserted in the student's file. The decision of the 
hearing officer shall be final. 

Grades may be challenged under this procedure only on 
the basis of the accuracy of their transcription. 
Exceptions to the Policy. It is the position of the Univer- 
sity that certain data/information maintained in various 
offices of the University is not subject to the provisions of 
this policy with regard to inspection, review, challenge, 
correction or deletion. 

(a) Statements submitted by parent/guardian or spouse in 
support of financial aid or residency determinations 
are considered to be confidential between those per- 
sons and the University, and are not subject to the pro- 
visions of this policy except with the written consent 
of the persons involved. Such documents are not re- 
garded as part of the student's official record. 

(b) University employment records of students are not in- 
cluded in this policy, except as provided under Article 
76A of the Annotated Code of Maryland. 

(c) With regard to general health data, only that data/infor- 
mation which is used by the University in making a de- 
cision regarding the student's status is subject to 
review by the student under this policy. Written psy- 
chiatric or psychological case notes which form the 
basis for diagnoses, recommendations, or treatment 
plans remain privileged information not accessible to 
the student. Such case notes are not considered to be 
part of official University records. To ensure the avail- 
ability of correct and helpful interpretations of any 
psychological test scores, notes or other evaluative or 
medical materials, the contents of these files for an in- 
dividual student may be reviewed by that student only 
in consultation with a professional staff member of 
the specific department involved. 

(d) Records relating to a continuing or active investigation 



16 / General Information 



by the campus security office, or records of said office 
not relating to the student's status with the University 
are not subject to this policy. 
(e) No student is entitled to see information or records 
that pertain to another student, to parents, or to other 
third parties. A student is entitled to review only that 
portion of an official record or file that pertains to him. 

Notice. Notice of these policies and procedures will be 
published by the University. 

The foregoing statement of University policy becomes 
effective immediately, but should be regarded as tentative 
pending the issuance of federal regulations and guide- 
lines or amendments in the applicable laws. 

The masculine gender of personal pronouns in this 
document includes the feminine gender. 
Approved by the President's Administrative Council, 
2/3/75. 



Admission to 
Graduate School 

Graduate Programs 

Programs Degrees Offered 

Administration, Supervision and Curriculum ' . .M.Ed., 
M.A.V A.G.S., Ed.D., Ph.D. 

Aerospace Engineering M.S.*, Ph.D. 

Agricultural and Extension Education^ M.S.*. 

A.G.S., Ph.D. 
Agricultural and Resource Economics . . .M.S.*. Ph.D. 

Agricultural Engineering M.S.*, Ph.D. 

Agronomy M.S.*, Ph.D. 

American Studies' M.A.*, Ph.D. 

Animal Sciences M.S., Ph.D. 

Applied Mathematics M.A.*, Ph.D. 

Art M.A.*, M.F.A., Ph.D. 

Astronomy' M.S.*, Ph.D. 

Botany M.S., Ph.D. 

Business Administration' M.B.A., D.B.A. 

Chemical Engineering M.S.*. Ph.D. 

Chemical Physics M.S., Ph.D. 

Chemistry M.S.*, Ph.D. 

Civil Engineering M.S.*, Ph.D. 

Comparative Literature M.A.*, Ph.D. 

ComputerScience' M.S.*, Ph.D. 

Counseling and Personnel Services' . . .M.Ed., M.A.*, 

A.G.S., Ph.D. 

Criminal Justice and Criminology' M.A.*, Ph.D. 

Early Childhood-Elementary Education' .M.Ed.,M.A., 
A.G.S., Ed.D., Ph.D. 

Economics' M.A.*, Ph.D. 

Electrical Engineering M.S.*, Ph.D. 

Engineering Materials M.S.*, Ph.D. 

English Language and Literature M.A.*, Ph.D. 

Entomology M.S.*, Ph.D. 

Family and Community Development' M.S. 

Food. Nutrition and Institution Administration' .M.S.* 

Food Science M.S.*. Ph.D. 

French Language and Literature' M.A.*, Ph.D. 

Geography' M.A.*, Ph.D. 

Germanic Language and Literature M.A.*, Ph.D. 



Government and Politics' M.A.*, Ph.D. 

Health Education M.A.. Ed.D., Ph.D. 

Hearing and Speech Sciences' M.A.*, Ph.D. 

History' M.A., Ph.D. 

Horticulture M.S.*, Ph.D. 

Human Development Education' . M.Ed., M.A., A.G.S., 

Ed.D.. Ph.D. 
Industrial Education' . M.Ed., M.A., A.G.S., Ed.D., Ph.D. 

Journalism' M.A.* 

Library and Information Services' M.L.S., Ph.D. 

Mathematics M.A.*, Ph.D. 

Measurement and Statistics' . . .M.Ed.,M.A.*,A.G.S., 

Ed.D., Ph.D. 

Mechanical Engineering M.S.*, Ph.D. 

Meteorology M.S., Ph.D. 

Microbiology' M.S., Ph.D. 

Music' M.M.,D.M.A.,Ph.D. 

Nuclear Engineering M.S.*, Ph.D, 

Nutritional Sciences M.S.*, Ph.D. 

Philosophy' M.A.*, Ph.D. 

Physical Education' M.A., Ph.D. 

Physics' M.S.*, Ph.D. 

Poultry Science M.S., Ph.D. 

Psychology' M.A., M.S., Ph.D. 

Recreation' M.A., Ed.D., Ph.D. 

Secondary Education' M.Ed., M.A.*, A.G.S., 

Ed.D.. Ph.D. 

Social Foundations of Education' M.A.*, Ph.D. 

Sociology' M.A., Ph.D. 

Spanish Language and Literature M.A.*, Ph.D. 

Special Education'. . .M.Ed.,M.A.,A.G.S., Ed.D., Ph.D. 

Speechand DramaticArt' M.A.* 

Text lies and Consumer Economics' M.S.*, Ph.D. 

Urban Studies' M.A.* 

Zoology M.S.*, Ph.D. 



'GMAT (Graduate Management & Admissions Test) 
^Miller Analogies Test required for admission. 
'Graduate Record Examination Aptitude Test required. 
'Graduate Record Examination Advanced Test required. 
'Both Aptitude and Advanced Graduate Record Examina- 
tions required. 

*Non-thesis option available for M.A. or M.S. 

For further details on entrance examinations see 
Admission to Graduate School below. 



Administrative Offices 

The administrative offices of the Graduate School are 
located on the second floor of the South Administration 
Building, and the Dean. Associate Dean, and Assistant 
Dean for Graduate Studies and their staff may be found in 
Suite 2133. Other offices to which students may go for 
administrative assistance are listed below: 
Office of the Director of Graduate Records: Room 2125, 
South Administration Building. The Director of Records of 
the Graduate School is the person in charge of graduate 
admissions and records of degree progress for all pro- 
spective and admitted students. 

Office of Graduate Admissions: Room 2107, South Admin- 
istration Building. This office receives and maintains all 



General Information / 17 



files of students applying for admission and answers all 
inquiries regarding the admission process. 
Office of Graduate Records: Room 2117, Soutfi Admin- 
istration Building. This office maintains all files for grad- 
uate students after they have been admitted and provides 
information on registration procedures. Students may ob- 
tain the "Continuous Registration Form" and the "Inter- 
campus Enrollment Form" here, and petitions and infor- 
mation on in-state classification for tuition and charge- 
differential purposes are handled by this office. 
Fellowships and Finance Office: Room 2126, South Ad- 
ministration Building. The Fellowships and Finance Office 
serves as a clearinghouse for information on available 
fellowships which are sponsored by the Graduate School. 
Office of the Assistant to the Dean: Room 2114, South Ad- 
ministration Building. The Assistant to the Dean is gener- 
ally responsible for assuring that the academic programs 
and accomplishments of graduate students fulfill the re- 
quirements for degrees established by the Graduate 
Council. The following forms are received and processed 
by this office: 1) "Doctoral Candidacy Forms"; 2) "Mas- 
ter's Approved Program Form"; 3) "Certification of Com- 
pletion of the Non-thesis Master's Option"; 4) "Certifica- 
tion of Completion of the Master's Thesis"; 5) "Certifica- 
tion of Completion of the Doctoral Dissertation." It is to 
this office that copies of the thesis and dissertation must 
be submitted, and it is the Assistant to the Dean who pre- 
pares official commencement lists. In addition, students 
submit to this office registration forms for foreign lan- 
guage examinations and requests for approval of transfer 
of credit. 

General 

Responsibility for admitting applicants to graduate pro- 
grams rests with the Dean for Graduate Studies and his 
staff, who regularly seek the advice of the chairmen and 
graduate admission committees of the academic pro- 
grams in making their decisions. In the case of foreign 
student applicants, the University's Director of Interna- 
tional Education is also consulted. Standards applied by 
the Graduate School and individual programs are to insure 
that students admitted have high qualifications and a rea- 
sonable expectation of successfully completing a grad- 
uate program. Standards for admission to doctoral pro- 
grams are frequently higher than those for admission to 
master's programs. In many degree programs applications 
by qualified students for admission to graduate study 
regularly exceed the number of students who can be 
accommodated. In order to maintain programs of out- 
standing quality, the number of spaces in each program is 
limited according to the availability of faculty, special 
resources, and funds for students requiring financial 
assistance. The Graduate School admits the most highly 
qualified applicants up to the limit of the number of 
spaces in each program. 

Criteria for Admission 

The decision to admit an applicant to a program is based 
primarily on results from a combination of the following 
criteria, according to requirements of the specific pro- 
gram or department. 



1 . Quality of previous undergraduate and graduate work. 

The Graduate School requires as a minimum standard 
a B average or 3.0 on a 4.0 scale, in a program of study 
resulting in the award of a baccalaureate degree from 
a regionally accredited college or university. In addi- 
tion, the student's undergraduate program should in- 
clude completion of the prerequisites for graduate 
study in his chosen field. In individual programs, where 
resources are available, a few applicants who do not 
meet this minimum standard for undergraduate work 
may be provisionally admitted if there is compelling 
evidence on the basis of other criteria of a reasonable 
likelihood of success in the program the person de- 
sires to enter. If an applicant has studied at the grad- 
uate level elsewhere, less weight may be, but is not 
necessarily, placed on the quality of the undergraduate 
academic record. Some programs may require a higher 
minimum grade average for admission. 

2. Strength of letters of recommendation from persons 
competent to judge the applicant's probable success 
in graduate school. Usually these letters are from the 
applicant's former professors who are able to give an in- 
depth evaluation of the applicant's strengths and weak- 
nesses with respect to academic work. Additional rec- 
ommendations may come from employers or super- 
visors who are familiar with the applicant's work experi- 
ence. Applicants should instruct their references to 
send all letters of recommendation directly to the pro- 
gram in which they desire entrance. Some departments 
do not require letters of recommendation (See applica- 
tion form.). 

3. Scores on a nationally standardized examination. 
Because the predictive utility of these scores may vary 
from one group of applicants to another, a discriminat- 
ing use of all relevant materials will be made in each 
applicant's case. The three most widely used stan- 
dardized examinations are the Graduate Record Exam- 
inations, Graduate Management Admissions Test, and 
the Miller Analogies Test. 

GRADUATE RECORD EXAMINATIONS (GRE): Al- 
though many graduate programs do not require the 
GRE, almost all will use such test scores as an addi- 
tional measure of an applicant's qualifications. The 
GRE may be taken in either or both of two forms; The 
Aptitude Test and The Advanced Test. Applicants can 
take this test in their senior year or when filing for ad- 
mission. For details, applicants should write directly to 
Graduate Record Examinations, Educational Testing 
Service, Box 955, Princeton, New Jersey 08540. 

GRADUATE MANAGEMENT ADMISSIONS TEST 
(GMAT): Details about this test, required when applying 
to a program in Business and Management, can be ob- 
tained by writing to the Educational Testing Service, 
Box 966, Princeton, N.J. 08540. 

THE MILLER ANALOGIES TEST (MAT): Details about 
the graduate form of this test can be obtained by writ- 
ing to the Director, Counseling Center, University of 
Maryland, College Park, Md. 20742. 

For information on the programs requiring one of these 
tests, please see the List of Graduate Programs in this 
catalog and the instructions accompanying application 
forms. 



18 / General Information 



4. Statement by the applicant of his academic and career 
objectives and their relation to the program of study he 
wishes to pursue. These statements help the depart- 
ment or progam identify students whose objectives are 
consonant with the objectives of the program. 

5. Other evidence of graduate potential. Some programs 
require other evidence of graduate potential, such as 
samples from portfolios of creative work, completion 
of specialized examinations, or personal interviews. 

In addition to the above criteria, special consideration will 
be given to: 

1. Residence of the applicant. While the University de- 
sires to maintain a geographically diverse graduate 
student population, it also recognizes its responsibility 
to legal residents of the state. Every effort will be made 
to accommodate qualified Maryland residents. 

2. Sex and minority group membership. The University of 
Maryland, its Graduate School and each of its academ- 
ic components have strong affirmative action programs 
for increasing the participation of minority groups and 
women among its students, staff and faculty. 

Categories of 

Admission to Degree Programs 

Full Graduate Status 

For admission in this category an applicant must have 
received a baccalaureate degree from a regionally accred- 
ited institution and be otherwise fully qualified in every 
respect. 

Provisional Graduate Status 

This designation may be used when 1) the quality of the 
previous academic record at a regionally accredited insti- 
tution is lower than established standards or when there 
is a lack of adequate prerequisite course work in the 
chosen field: 2) when the applicant has majored in another 
area with a creditable record but there is some doubt 
about his ability to pursue the program of study in ques- 
tion; 3) when the applicant is engaged in graduate study at 
another institution but is not able to furnish a transcript 
indicating completion of course work or degree require- 
ments; or 4) when the applicant is a senior in his final 
semester of work for a bachelor's degree and is not able 
to furnish a final transcript indicating the completion of 
all requirements and the award of the degree. 

Students admitted provisionally because of incomplete 
official supporting documents must have a complete offi- 
cial record of all previous work sent to the Graduate 
School within three months following the completion of 
such study and the award of the degree, or they face can- 
cellation of admission. 

Students admitted provisionally because of incomplete 
official supporting documents must have a complete offi- 
cial record of all previous work sent to the Graduate 
School within three months following the completion of 
such study and the award of the degree, or they face can- 
cellation of admission. 

A program to correct any deficiencies in preparation 
will be outlined by the faculty, and the student is expect- 
ed to become fully qualified within a specified time limit. 



When all conditions have been met, the department may 
recommend admission of the student to full status. Stu- 
dents who are unable to qualify for full admission under 
the conditions specified may have their admission termi- 
nated. 

Non-degree Admission Categories 

Advanced Graduate Specialist Certificate Status 

The Advanced Graduate Specialist program is designed to 
promote a high level of professional competence in an 
area of specialization in the field of education. The candi- 
date must be able to show that he or she can operate as 
an effective counselor, administrator, teacher or skilled 
person in his major field of professional endeavor. The Ad- 
vanced Graduate Specialist Certificate is offered through 
most of the programs in the College of Education and the 
Agricultural and Extension Education program in the Col- 
lege of Agriculture. The Certificate is awarded by the Col- 
lege of Education or by the College of Agriculture. Re- 
quirements are as follows: 

1. Applicants must meet the same general criteria for 
admission as are prescribed for degree seekers. Addi- 
tionally, the applicant must have completed a master's 
degree or the equivalent in credits earned either at the 
University of Maryland or at another regionally accredited 
institution. The Miller Analogies Test scores are required 
at the time of application. 

2. Coursework totaling not more than 30 credits with 
grades of at least a "B" from an accredited institution 
may be transferred to the program at the University of 
Maryland. 

3. The program must be developed in cooperation with an 
advisor and filed with the Graduate Studies office in the 
College of Education. 

4. The Advanced Graduate Specialist Certificate program 
requires a minimum of 60 semester hours of credit with 
not less than 30 semester hours of credit completed with 
the University of Maryland. At least one half of the credits 
earned either at other institutions or at the University of 
Maryland must be in courses comparable to those in the 
600-800 series. The student may be required to take a sub- 
stantial portion of the program in departments other than 
those in the College of Education or the College of Agri- 
culture. Registration in certain kinds of field study, field 
experience, apprenticeship or internship may also be re- 
quired. 

5. There will be a written examination of not less than six 
hours. A "B" average with no "D" or "F" grades will be 
required before the certificate can be awarded. 

For additional details see "Statement of Policies and 
Procedures; Advanced Graduate Specialist Program in Ed- 
ucation," issued by the College of Education. 

Advanced Special Student Status 

The Advanced Special Student Status is designed to pro- 
vide an opportunity to individuals who do not have an im- 
mediate degree objective in mind to take graduate level 
courses. Although the primary mission of the Graduate 
School is to conduct programs of graduate instruction 
leading to advanced degrees, the Graduate Faculty wel- 
comes, to the extent that available resources allow, qual- 
ified students who have no degree objectives. 



General Information / 19 



Applicants for admission to Advanced Special Student 
Status must satisfy at least one of the following criteria: 

1. Hold a baccalaureate degree from a regionally ac- 
credited institution with an overall "B" (3.0) average. Ap- 
plicants must submit official transcripts covering all 
credits used in satisfying the baccalaureate degree re- 
quirements. 

2. Hold a master's or doctoral degree from a regionally 
accredited institution. Applicants must submit an official 
transcript showing the award of a master's or doctoral 
degree. 

3. Hold a baccalaureate degree from a regionally ac- 
credited institution and have at least four years of suc- 
cessful post-baccalaureate work or professional experi- 
ence. Applicants must submit an official transcript show- 
ing the award of the baccalaureate degree and a signed 
statement summarizing successful post-baccalaureate 
work or professional experience. Letters from employers 
or professional organizations to support the statement of 
successful professional experiences are also required. 

4. Achieve a score that places the applicant in the upper 
50 percentile of appropriate national standardized apti- 
tude examinations such as the Graduate Record Examina- 
tion Aptitude Test, the Miller's Analogies Test, the Grad- 
uate Management Admissions Test. 

Admission to Advanced Special Student status will con- 
tinue for five years. If there is no registration in three 
consecutive academic year semesters, the admitted sta- 
tus will lapse, after which a new application will be 
.'equired. 

Advanced Special Students must maintain a 2.75 grade 
point average. 

Advanced Special Students must pay all standard grad- 
uate fees. Students in this status are not eligible to hold 
appointments as Graduate Teaching or Research Assist- 
ants or Fellows. All other services, e.g. parking, library 
privileges, etc., are the same as those accorded to other 
graduate students. 

Admission to Advanced Special Student status is not 
intended to be used as a preparatory program for later 
admission to a doctoral or master's program nor to the 
Advanced Graduate Specialist Certificate program. Cred- 
its earned while in this status may be applicable to a de- 
gree or certificate program at a later time only with the 
approval of the faculty in the desired program, if the stu- 
dent is subsequently accepted for degree or certificate 
study. For consideration of admission to a degree pro- 
gram at a later time, the student must submit an applica- 
tion in the standard format, with a new application fee, to 
the Graduate School. 

Visiting Graduate Student Status 

A graduate student matriculated in another graduate 
school, who wishes to enroll in the Graduate School of 
the University of Maryland at College Park and who in- 
tends thereafter to return to the graduate school in which 
he is matriculated, may be admitted as a Visiting Grad- 
uate Student. 

Criteria for enrollment as a visitor are admission to and 
good standing in another recognized graduate school. The 
applicant need not submit full transcripts of credits, but 
he must apply for admission to the UMCP Graduate 



School and pay the application fee. In lieu of transcripts, 
a student may have his own graduate dean certify, in writ- 
ing, to the Graduate School that he is in good standing 
and that the credits will be accepted toward his graduate 
degree. Unless otherwise specified, admission will be 
offered for one year only. 

Non-degree Student Status— Undergraduate 

This is an undergraduate classification and may be 
assigned by the Director of Admissions (undergrad- 
uate division) to those applicants who have received 
the baccalaureate or an advanced degree from a re- 
gionally accredited institution but who do not desire 
or who do not qualify for graduate admission. Non- 
degree seeking students who do not have a bacca- 
laureate degree or an R.N. must submit transcripts 
and meet regular admission standards. Transcripts 
are not required from students with baccalaureate 
degrees or an R.N. 

Application for Non-degree Student Status- 
Undergraduate must be made directly to the Office 
of Admissions, not to the Graduate School. 

Students often need permission from the deans of 
the various schools and colleges of the university 
to enroll as a Non-degree Student. Non-degree Stu- 
dents may enroll for courses through the 500 num- 
bered series for which they possess the necessary 
prerequisites. Courses numbered 600 or above are 
restricted to admitted graduate students only. 

The student is warned that no credit earned while 
in a Non-degree Student Status— Undergraduate 
may be applied at a later date to a degree program. 

Offer of Admission 

A written offer of admission is made to all accepted 
applicants and specifies the date of entrance, which 
will normally coincide with the date requested in the 
application. The student must accept or decline the 
offer of admission by the date indicated in the offer, 
or it lapses and the space is reassigned to another 
applicant. An individual whose offer of admission 
has lapsed must submit a new application and fee, if 
he wants to be reconsidered for admission at a later 
date. 

The offer of admission is also a permit-to-register 
for courses and must be presented by the student at 
the time of his first registration. Identification as a 
graduate student, to be used thereafter, will be is- 
sued at the time of first registration. 

Admission Time Limits 

For master's degree candidates. Advanced Graduate 
Specialist Certificate seekers, and Advanced Special 
Students, admission terminates five years from the 
entrance date. Visitmg Graduate Students and NSF 
Institute students are admitted for specified periods. 
A doctoral student must be admitted to candidacy 
within five years after entrance and must complete 
all remaining requirements within four years after 
admission to candidacy. Admission to the doctoral 
program terminates If these conditions are not met. 



20 / General Information 



Change of Objective, Status 
Termination of Admission 

students are admitted only to a specified program 
and within that program only for the specified ob- 
jective: e.g., master's degree, doctoral degree, or 
Advanced Graduate Specialist Certificate. If the stu- 
dent wishes to change either the program, the objec- 
tive within that program, or his status (for example, 
from Advanced Special Student to degree status), he 
must submit a new application and fee for admis- 
sion. Admission in the new status is not granted 
automatically. 

The student's admission also terminates when the 
original objective has been attained; for example, 
the admission terminates when a student who is ad- 
mitted for the master's degree completes the re- 
quirements for that degree. If the student wishes to 
continue for the doctorate, a new application for ad- 
mission to the doctoral program must be submitted; 
requests for admission to the doctoral program are 
subject to the same review process applied to others 
seeking admission to that program. 

A student can be admitted to only one graduate pro- 
gram at any one time. Application for and acceptance of 
an offer of admission in a second graduate program auto- 
matically terminates the student's admission to the first 
program. 

Students must maintain an average grade of B or better 
in all graduate courses taken and must otherwise satisfy 
all additional departmental and Graduate School program 
requirements. The admission of all students, both degree 
and non-degree, is continued at the discretion of the 
major professor, the department or program director, and 
the Dean for Graduate Studies. 

Admission of Faculty 

No member of the faculty employed by the University of 
Maryland having the rank of Assistant Professor or above 
is permitted to take work leading to an advanced degree 
at this institution. 

Application Instructions 

To apply you must send both the completed application 
and complete, official transcripts covering all credits 
earned at any institution, in duplicate, to the Office of the 
Dean for Graduate Studies, University of Maryland, Col- 
lege Park, Maryland 20742. Applications and supporting 
materials must be received in the Office by the following 
dates: 

For entry for either summer terms and for fall semes- 
ters March 1 

For entry for spring semesters November 1 

Decisions on admission and financial aid will first be 
made for those whose completed applications and sup- 
porting material have been received by the Graduate 
School on or before March 1. Qualified applicants whose 
completed applications and supporting material are re- 
ceived after March 1 but on or before May 1 will be grant- 
ed admission and financial aid on a first-come, first-serve 
basis, up to the limits of available space in the program. 



It is in general to the student's advantage to apply be- 
fore the deadline, since in many programs, no space will 
be available to those who apply after March 1 due to heavy 
demand for admission. Applicants who require financial 
support and wish to be among those first considered 
should submit their applications by February 1. 

The application should arrive before the arrival of tran- 
scripts and other supporting evidence of preparation, if 
these materials cannot be attached to the application. 

Applicants are solely responsible for making certain 
that their transcripts have, in fact, been received by the 
Graduate School and not by the Registrar's Office or the 
graduate program desired, since there is no follow-up 
action taken by the Graduate School. 

Students who apply in their senior year in college must 
have a transcript sent to the Graduate School of all 
coursework completed up to the time of application. In 
addition, senior year first semester grade reports should 
be forwarded, if they are not on the current transcript, 
since no final decision will be possible without such 
grades. Seniors should also submit with the application 
a list of the courses in which they are currently enrolled. 

An official transcript is defined as a record which bears 
the signature of the registrar and the seal of the insti- 
tution. 

A complete and separate application and fee must be 
submitted for each program in which entrance is sought. 
A new application is also required if there is a change in 
the objective or program. 

A fee of $15.00 must accompany the application for 
admission. This fee is not refundable under any circum- 
stances. Payment must be made by check or money order 
payable to the University of Maryland. Do not send stamps 
or cash. 

Foreign Student Applications 

No foreign student seeking admission to the University of 
Maryland should plan to leave his country before receiving 
an official offer of admission from the Director of Grad- 
uate Records of the Graduate School. 

Academic Credentials 

The complete application and official academic creden- 
tials—beginning with secondary school records— should 
be received by the Graduate Admissions Office at least 
seven months prior to the beginning of the semester in 
which the student plans to enter the graduate program. 
Space available for foreign students may have been filled 
prior to this deadline, and all qualified students may not 
be accepted. 

English Proficiency 

In addition to meeting academic requirements, the for- 
eign student applicant must demonstrate proficiency in 
English by taking the Test of English as a Foreign lan- 
guage (TOEFL). Because TOEFL is given only four times 
a year throughout various parts of the world, as soon as 
a student contemplates study at the University of Mary- 
land, he should make arrangements to take the test. For 
test information, write to TOEFL Director, Educational 
Testing Service, Box 899, Princeton, New Jersey 08540. 
When the applicant is ready to begin his studies, he will 



General Information / 21 



be expected to read, speak, and write English fluently, to 
understand lectures and to take pertinent notes. 

Financial Resources 

A statement regarding the applicant's financial support is 
required by the Office of International Education Services. 
The Office must be assured that an applicant has suffi- 
cient financial resources to meet educational and living 
expenses of approximately $7,000 per year for the entire 
period of study at the University of Maryland. 

Immigration Documents 

it is necessary for students eligible for admission to se- 
cure from the university's Director of International Educa- 
tion Services the immigration form required for obtaining 
the appropriate visa. Students already studying in the 
United States who wish to transfer to the University of 
Maryland must also secure proper immigration docu- 
ments to request the Immigration and Naturalization Ser- 
vice to grant permission for transfer. 

Reporting Upon Arrival 

Every foreign student is expected to report to the Office 
of International Education Services, Room 2115, North Ad- 
ministration Building, as soon as possible after he arrives 
at the University. This Office will be able to assist not only 
with various problems regarding immigration, housing, 
and fees, but also with problems relating generally to 
orientation to university and community life. 

Questions concerning criteria and requirements for for- 
eign applicants should be addressed to the Director, Inter- 
national Education Services, University of Maryland, Col- 
lege Park, Md. 20742. 

Records Maintenance and Disposition 

All records, including academic records from other institu- 
tions, become part of the official file and can neither be 
returned nor duplicated for any purpose. A student should 
obtain an additional copy of his official credentials to 
keep in his possession for advisory purposes and for 
other personal requirements. 

The admission credentials and the application data of 
applicants who do not register for courses at the time for 
which they have been admitted or whose applications 
have been disapproved or who do not respond to the de- 
partmental requests for additional information or whose 
applications are not complete with respect to the receipt 
of all transcripts or test results are retained for 18 months 
only and then destroyed. 

Registration and Credits 

Schedule of Classes 

Graduate students are expected to be thoroughly familiar 
with the "Schedule of Classes," a publication issued prior 
to the beginning of each semester, available in the li- 
braries, the North Administralion Building, and the Stu- 
dent Union. The summer session publication, with infor- 
mation on both summer sessions, is available in the 
Turner Laboratory Summer School Offices. The "Schedule 
of Classes" lists rules and regulations governing all as- 
pects of registration, including deadlines; procedures for 



dropping or adding a course or making other changes in 
registration; procedures for the payment of tuition and 
fees; information about the times and places classes will 
be offered; and the names of the professors or instructors 
who will be teaching a particular course or section. It also 
contains the names, telephone numbers, and office loca- 
tions of persons who can supply additional information. 

Developing a Program 

The student is responsible for ascertaining and complying 
with the rules and procedures of the Graduate School and 
all applicable department or graduate program require- 
ments which govern the individual program of study. 

Registration for the newly admitted graduate student 
seeking a degree or certificate begins with a visit to the 
student's academic advisor in the graduate program or de- 
partment to which the student has been admitted. There 
the student will obtain information about specific degree 
or certificate requirements, which supplement those of 
the Graduate School. 

The student will consult the "Schedule of Classes" 
and will develop, in consultation with a graduate faculty 
advisor, an individual program of study and research. 

Students admitted to Advanced Special Student Status 
may seek advice from the Dean for Graduate Studies and 
his staff or from appropriate faculty members. 

While most questions normally raised by graduate stu- 
dents, and most problems they meet, will be answered or 
resolved by the faculty advisor or a departmental commit- 
tee, the students should remember that the staff of the 
Graduate School is specifically charged with the responsi- 
bility for assisting graduate students who need additional 
information, guidance, or assistance. Further, the Dean 
for Graduate Students is the individual to whom requests 
or petitions for exceptions or waivers of regulations or 
graduate degree requirements should be addressed and to 
whom appeals from decisions of departmental or program 
faculty or administrators should be directed. 

Course Numbering System 

Courses are designated as follows: 

000-099 Non-credit courses. 

100-199 Primarily freshman courses. 

200-299 Primarily sophomore courses. 

300-399 Junior and senior courses not ac- 

ceptable for credit toward graduate 
degrees. 

400-499 Junior and senior courses accept- 

able for credit toward some grad- 
uate degrees. 

500-599 Professional school courses (Den- 

tistry, Law, Medicine) and post-bac- 
calaureate courses not for graduate 
degree credit. 

600-898 Courses restricted to graduate stu- 

dents. 

799 Master's thesis credit. 

899 Doctoral dissertation credit. 

The first character of the numeric position deter- 
mines the level of *he ccrse and the last two digits 



22 / General Information 



are used for course identification. Courses ending 
with an 8 or 9 are courses that are repeatabie for 
credit. All non-repeatable courses must end in 
through 7. 

Graduate credit will not be given unless the stu- 
dent has been admitted to the Graduate School. 

Designation of Full and Part-time 
Graduate Students 

In order to accurately reflect the involvement of graduate 
students in their programs of study and research and the 
use of University resources in those programs, the Grad- 
uate Council uses the graduate unit in making calcula- 
tions to determine full or part-time student status in the 
administration of the minimum registration requirements 
described belovk* and in responding to student requests 
for certification of full-time student status. The num- 
ber of graduate units per semester credit hour is cal- 
culated in the following manner: 

Courses in the series: 000-399 carry 2 units/credit 

hour. 

Courses in the series: 400-499 carry 4 units/credit 

hour. 

Courses in the series: 500-599 carry 5 units/credit 

hour. 

Courses in the series: 600-898 carry 6 units/credit 

hour. 

Research course: 799 carries 12 units/credit hour. 

Research course: 899 carries 18 units/credit hour. 

To be certified as a full-time student a graduate student 
must be officially registered for a combination of courses 
equivalent to 48 units per semester. A graduate assistant 
holding a regular appointment is a full-time student, if he 
is registered for at least 24 units in addition to the asslst- 
antship. 

Grades for Graduate Students 

A minimum grade point average of 3.0 is required for grad- 
uation with a graduate degree. 

Grading Systems 

The conventional A through F grading system is used in 
graduate level courses. 

A "Satisfactory or Failure" (S— F) grading system may 
be used, at the discretion of the department or program, 
for certain types of graduate study. These include courses 
which require independent field work, special projects, or 
independent study. Departmental seminars, workshops, 
and departmental courses in instructional methods may 
also be appropriate for the S— F grading system. 

The "Pass— Fail" grade option, which may be elected 
by undergraduates, is not available to students at the 
graduate level. 

Thesis and dissertation research, and courses labelled 
"Independent Study" or "Special Problems," may use 
either the A— F or the S — F grading system. 

Only one grading system will be used for a single 
course in a particular semester. The grading system will 
be designated by the department or program offering the 
course. 

Computation of Grade Point Average 
The A is calculated at 4 quality points, and the grades of 



D, F, and I receive no quality points. After a student is 
matriculated as a graduate student, all courses he takes 
numbered 400 and above, except those numbered 799 or 
899 and those graded with an S, will be used in the calcu- 
lation of the grade point average. A student may repeat 
any course in an effort to earn a better grade. The later 
grade, whether higher or lower, will be used in computing 
the grade point average. No course taken after August 23, 
1974, will be considered "not applicable" for the purpose 
of computing the grade point average of a graduate stu- 
dent. No graduate credit transferred from another institu- 
tion will be included in the calculation of the grade point 
average. 

Minimum Registration Requirements for 
Doctoral Candidates 

Doctoral students who have been advanced to candidacy 
must register each semester, excluding summer sessions, 
until the degree is awarded. 

Dissertation Research 

Those who have not completed the required 12 semester 
credit hours of Dissertation Research (899), or its equiva- 
lent, must register for a minimum of 18 graduate units 
each semester. Doctoral candidates whose demands upon 
the University are greater than that represented by this 
minimum registration will, of course, be expected to regis- 
ter for the number of units which reflect their use of Uni- 
versity resources. 

Continuous Registration 

Doctoral candidates who have completed the required 
minimum of 12 credit hours of Dissertation Research 
(899), or its equivalent, and who are making no use of 
University resources, must meet a Continuous Registra- 
tion requirement, in each semester, except for summer 
sessions, until the degree is awarded. This requirement 
is met by submitting the Continuous Registration Form 
and paying the $10.00 Continuous Registration fee, in per- 
son or by mail, directly to the Graduate School. Forms 
and fees must be received before the end of the eighth 
week of classes during the fall and spring semesters. 
Continuous Registration forms may be obtained from the 
Graduate School, Room 2117, South Administration Build- 
ing, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742. 
Failure to comply with the requirement for maintaining 
Continuous Registration will be taken as evidence that 
the student has terminated his doctoral program, and ad- 
mitted status to the Graduate School will be terminated. A 
new application tor admission, with the consequent re- 
evaluation of the student's performance, will be required 
of a student wishing to resume a graduate program, 
whose admission has been terminated under this regula- 
tion. 

Partial Credit Course Registration for 
Handicapped Students 

The Graduate School recognizes that physically handi- 
capped students may derive considerable educational 
benefit from courses which include laboratories or other 
non-classroom activities in which the student is prevented 
from participating because of the handicap. It is, there- 
General Information / 23 



fore, the policy of the Graduate School to allow handi- 
capped students to enroll in such courses, complete only 
those parts of the course that their physical capabilities 
permit, and receive credit for the course proportionate to 
their levels of participation. 

Physically handicapped graduate students wishing to 
enroll in such courses but participate only in certain as- 
pects of them, should consult the Assistant to the Dean 
of the Graduate School (Room 2114 South Administration 
Building). That person will assist the student in making 
the necessary arrangements with the department offering 
the course, the department supervising the student's 
graduate program, and the Registration Office. The final 
agreement as to the student's level of participation and 
the amount of credit to be awarded will be specified in an 
agreement to be drawn up by the Graduate School and 
signed by all parties concerned. 

Graduate Credit for Senior Undergraduates 

A senior at the University of Maryland at College Park who 
is within seven credit hours of completing the require- 
ments for an undergraduate degree may, with the approval 
of his undergraduate dean, the provost of his division, the 
department or program offering the course, and the Grad- 
uate School, register for graduate courses. These may 
later be counted for graduate credit toward an advanced 
degree at the University, if the student has been approved 
for admission to the Graduate School. The total of under- 
graduate and graduate courses must not exceed 15 cred- 
its for the semester. Excess credits in the senior year can- 
not be used for graduate credit unless proper prearrange- 
ment is made. Seniors who wish to register for graduate 
credit should inquire at the Graduate School, Office of the 
Director of Records, for information about the procedure. 

Undergraduate Credit for 
Graduate Level Courses 

Subject to requirements determined by the graduate facul- 
ty members of the department or program offering the 
course, undergraduate students may register for graduate 
level courses, i.e., those numbered from 600 to 898, with 
the exception of 799, for undergraduate credit. 

A student seeking to utilize this option will normally be 
in the senior year, have earned an accumulated grade 
point average of 3.0, have successfully completed, with a 
grade of B or better, the prerequisite and correlative 
courses, and be a major in the appropriate or a closely re- 
lated department. The student will be required to obtain 
prior approval of the department offering the course. 

Enrollment in a graduate level course does not in any 
way imply subsequent departmental or Graduate School 
approval for admission into a graduate program, nor may 
the course be used as credit for a graduate degree at the 
University of Maryland. 

Credit by Examination 

A graduate student may obtain graduate credit by exami- 
nation in courses at the 400 level previously identified by 
the appropriate department or program. As a general rule, 
credit by examination is not available for courses at the 
61^" 700, c ^00 levels for, in the judgment of the Graduate 

24 / General Information 



Council, courses at these levels require a continuing inter- 
action between faculty and students to achieve the educa- 
tional goals of advanced study. 

A student may receive credit by examination only for a 
course for which he is otherwise eligible to receive grad- 
uate credit. The department or program in which he is en- 
rolled may establish a limit on the number of credits 
which may be earned in this manner. Graduate students 
seeking credit by examination must obtain the consent of 
their advisor and of the instructor currently responsible 
for the course. Once the student begins the examination, 
the grade earned will be recorded. 

The Graduate School maintains a list of courses for 
which examinations are available or will be prepared. The 
fee for credit by examination for full-time graduate stu- 
dents is $30.00 per course regardless of the number of 
credits or units to be earned. Part-time graduate students 
will be charged the same fee per credit hour they would 
pay if taking the course in the usual manner. 

Transfer of Credit 

A maximum of six semester hours of graduate level 
course credits earned at regionally accredited institutions 
prior to, or after, matriculation in the Graduate School 
may be applied toward master's degrees at the University 
of Maryland. Proportionately larger amounts of credit may 
be applied toward doctoral degrees. 

All graduate study credits offered as transfer credit 
must meet the following criteria: 

1. They must have received graduate credit at the institu- 
tion where earned. 

2. They must not have been used to meet the require- 
ments for any degree previously earned. 

3. They must have been taken within the time limits appli- 
cable to degrees awarded by the Graduate School. 

4. The department or program to which the student has 
been admitted at Maryland must certify the courses are 
appropriate to the degree program the student is pur- 
suing at Maryland. 

5. The student must have earned a B or better in the 
courses offered for transfer credit. 

6. Transfer work normally satisfies only the 400 level re- 
quirements for the master's degree and does not apply 
to the upper level requirement. 

A student seeking acceptance of transfer credit is ad- 
vised to submit the necessary transcripts and certification 
of department or program approval to the Graduate 
School as promptly as possible for its review and deci- 
sion. 

Criteria That Courses l\/lust IVIeet To Be 
Accepted For Graduate Credit 

Any courses, workshops, or seminars planned to 
take place in a span of time less than a normal aca- 
demic semester or summer session and offering 
graduate credit to the participants must meet the 
following criteria: 
1. There must be 15 "contact hours" per graduate 

credit. 

a. Lectures: 1 contact hour per 50 minutes 
lecture. 



b. Non-lecture contact (laboratory, workshops, 
discussion and problem working sessions, 
etc.): 1 contact hour per 2 or 3 hour session. 

2. No more than three "contact hours" per day will 
be permitted. (Three "contact hours" are equiva- 
lent to 0.2 credits) 

3. Credit may be accumulated at the rate of no more 
than one credit per week. 

The Inter-Campus Student 

A student admitted to the Graduate School on any 
campus of the University is eligible to take courses 
on any other campus of the University with the ap- 
proval of his academic advisor and the graduate 
deans on the home and host campuses. Credits 
earned on a host campus are resident credit at the 
home campus and meet all degree requirements. 
Transcripts of work taken at another campus will be 
maintained on the home campus, and fees will be 
paid to the home campus. Forms for registration as 
an inter-campus student may be obtained from the 
Graduate School offices on any campus of the Uni- 
versity. 

DEGREE REQUIREMENTS 

Graduate School Requirements Applicable 
to all Master's Degrees. 

Programs 

The entire course of study undertaken for any mas- 
ter's degree must constitute a unified, coherent pro- 
gram which is approved by the student's advisor 
and by the Graduate School. 

A minimum of thirty semester hours in courses 
acceptable for credit towards a graduate degree is 
required; in certain cases six of the thirty semester 
hours must be thesis research credits. The graduate 
program must include at least 12 hours of course 
work at the 600 level or higher. If the student is in- 
adequately prepared for the required graduate 
courses, additional courses may be required, which 
may not be considered as part of the student's grad- 
uate program. 
Grade-point Average 

The student seeking any master's degree must main- 
tain an average grade of B over all courses taken for 
graduate credit. 
Time Limitation 

All requirements for the master's degree must be 
completed within a five year period. 
Residence Requirements 

A minimum residence of one year of full-time study, 
or its equivalent, at this university is required. 
Additional Requirements 

In addition to the above requirements, special de- 
partmental or collegiate requirements may be im- 
posed, especially for degrees which are offered only 
in one department, college, or division. For these 
special requirements consult the descriptions which 
appear under the departmental or collegiate listing 



in this catalog or the special publications which can 
be obtained from the department or college. 

Graduate School Requirements for 
the Degrees of Master of Arts 
and Master of Science 

THESIS OPTION 

Course Requirements 

A minimum of 30 semester hours including six hours 
of thesis research credit (799) is required for the 
degrees of Master of Arts and Master of Science. Of 
the 24 hours required in graduate courses, no less 
than 12 must be earned in the major subject. No 
less than one-half of the total required course cred- 
its for the degree, or a minimum of twelve, must be 
selected from courses numbered 600 or above. 
Thesis Requirement 

A thesis is required for the Master of Arts and Mas- 
ter of Science degrees except for those programs 
in which a non-thesis option has been approved by 
the Dean for Graduate Studies in conformity with 
the policy of the Graduate Council. Approval of the 
thesis is the responsibility of an examining commit- 
tee appointed by the Dean for Graduate Studies. The 
student's advisor is the chairman of the committee, 
and the remaining members of the committee are 
members of the graduate faculty who are familiar 
with the student's program of study. The chairman 
and the candidate are informed of the membership 
of the examining committee by the Dean. 

Directions for the preparation and submission of 
thesis will be found in the Graduate Student Aca- 
demic Handbook, which may be purchased at the 
university book store. 
Oral Examination 

A final oral examination on the thesis shall be held 
when the student has completed his thesis to the 
satisfaction of his advisor, providing he has com- 
pleted all other requirements for the degree and has 
earned a 3.0 grade average, computed in accordance 
with the regulations described under "Grades for 
Graduate Students." 

The examining committee, with a minimum of 
three members, conducts the oral examination (an 
additional comprehensive written examination may 
be required at the option of the department or pro- 
gram). The chairman of the examining committee 
selects the time and place for the examination and 
notifies other members of the committee and the 
candidate. Members of the committee must be given 
a minimum of seven school days in which to read 
the thesis. 

The duration of the examination is normally about 
an hour, but it may be longer if necessary to insure 
an adequate examination. The report of the commit- 
tee, signed by each member, must be submitted 
to the Dean for Graduate Studies no later than the 
appropriate date listed in the "Important Dates for 
Advisors and Students," if the student is to re- 
ceive a diploma at the Commencement in the se- 
mester in which the examination is held. 



General Information / 25 



NON-THESIS OPTION 

The requirements for Master of Arts and Master of 
Science degrees withiout thesis vary slightly among 
departments and programs in which this option is 
available. Standards for admission are, how/ever, 
identical with those for admission to any other mas- 
ter's program. The quality of the work expected of 
the student is also identical to that expected in the 
thesis programs. 

The general requirements for those on the non- 
thesis program are a minimum of 30 semester credit 
hours in courses approved for graduate credit with 
a minimum average grade of B in all course work 
taken; a minimum of 18 semester credit hours in 
courses numbered 600 or above; the submission of 
one or more scholarly papers; and successful com- 
pletion of a comprehensive final examination, a 
portion of which must be written. 

A student following a non-thesis master's pro- 
gram will be expected to meet the same deadlines 
for application for a diploma and for final examina- 
tion reports established for all other degree pro- 
grams. 

For information on programs which offer the non- 
thesis option, see the list of Graduate Programs 
in this Catalog. 



Requirements for the Degree of 
Master of Education 

Nearly all departments in Education offer the Master 
of Education (M.Ed.) degree with the following re- 
quirements: 

1. A minimum of 30 semester hours in coursework 
with a grade average of B. Grades for courses not 
a part of the program but taken in graduate status 
will be computed in the average. 

2. A minimum of 15 hours in courses numbered 600- 
800 with the remainder at least in the 400 series. 
Some departments require courses in depart- 
ments outside of those in Education. 

3. A comprehensive written examination taken at 
the end of coursework. A part of the examination 
may be oral. 

4. EDMS 646 or EDMU 690 and one seminar paper; 
or two seminar papers. 

5. EDMS 446 or EDMS 451. 

6. Test battery. 

For further details, see "Statement of Policies 
and Procedures: Master's Degrees in Education," 
issued by the College of Education, and descriptions 
of departmental programs 

Requirements Applicable to 
Other Master's Degrees 

The particular requirements for the degrees of Mas- 
ter of Business Administration, Master of Library 
Science, Master of Music, and Master of Fine Arts 
are given under the individual Graduate Program 
entries in those fields. 



Graduate School Requirements 
Applicable to All Doctoral Degrees 

Credit Requirements 

The Graduate School requires that every student 
seeking the doctoral degree register for a minimum 
number of 12 research credits, but the number of 
research and other credit hours required in the pro- 
gram varies with the degree and program in ques- 
tion. 

Residence 

The equivalent of three years of full-time graduate 
study and research is the minimum required. Of the 
three years, the equivalent of at least one year must 
be spent at the University of Maryland. On a part- 
time basis the time needed will be increased corre- 
spondingly. All work at other institutions offered in 
partial fulfillment of the requirements for any doc- 
toral degree must be submitted, with the recom- 
mendation of the department or program concerned, 
to the Graduate School for approval at the time of 
application for admission to candidacy. Official 
transcripts of the work must be filed in the Grad- 
uate School. 

Admission to Candidacy 

Preliminary examinations, or such other substantial 
tests as the departments may elect, are frequently 
prerequisite for admission to candidacy. 

A student must be admitted to candidacy for the 
doctorate within five years after admission to the 
doctoral program and at least one academic year 
before the date on which the degree will be con- 
ferred. 

It is the responsibility of the student to submit his 
application for admission to candidacy when all the 
requirements for candidacy have been fulfilled. 
Applications for admission to candidacy are made in 
duplicate by the student and submitted to the major 
department for further action and transmission to 
the Graduate School. Application forms may be ob- 
tained at the office of the Assistant to the Dean for 
Graduate Studies. 

Time Limitation 

The student must complete the entire program for 
the degree, including the dissertation and final ex- 
amination, during a four year period after admission 
to candidacy. Extensions of time are granted only 
under the most unusual circumstances. If a student 
fails to complete all requirements within the time 
allotted, he must submit another application for 
admission to the Graduate School and, if readmit- 
ted, another application for Advancement to Candi- 
dacy, after satisfying the usual program prerequi- 
sites prior to Advancement to Candidacy. 

Dissertation 

A dissertation or its equivalent is required of all 
candidates for a doctoral degree. The topic of the 
dissertation must be approved by the department or 
program committee. 

During the preparation of the dissertation, all 
candidates for any doctoral degree must register 



26 / General Information 



for the prescribed number of semester fiours of 
Doctoral Dissertation Research) (899) at the Uni- 
versity of Maryland. 

Directions for the preparation and submission of 
dissertations will be found in the Graduate Student 
Academic Handbook, which may be purchased at 
the university book store. 
Publication of the Dissertation 
If a student wishes to publish all or a portion of his 
thesis or dissertation prior to its defense and ap- 
proval by the Graduate Faculty examining commit- 
tee, he must first seek the approval of the Dean for 
Graduate Studies. This approval is sought through 
a letter to the Dean, endorsed by the dissertation 
advisor, containing an explanation of the need for 
early publication. 

Final Examination 

The final oral defense of the dissertation is con- 
ducted by a committee of the Graduate Faculty 
appointed by the Dean for Graduate Studies. Nomi- 
nations for membership on the committee are sub- 
mitted by the student's major professor by the third 
week of the semester in which the student expects 
to complete all requirements, but no later than two 
months prior to the examination, on the designated 
form. 

The major professor serves as chairman of the 
committee, which will consist of a minimum of five 
voting members, all of whom hold the doctoral de- 
gree. At least one of the five must be a faculty mem- 
ber in a department or Graduate Program external to 
the one in which the student is seeking the degree. 
A minimum of three members of the committee 
must be regular members of the Graduate Faculty 
of the University of Maryjand. 

One or more members of the committee may be 
persons from other institutions who hold the doc- 
torate and who are distinguished scholars in the 
field of the dissertation. 

The Dean for Graduate Studies designates one 
member of the committee as his representative. In 
addition to having the normal responsibility of a 
faculty examiner, the Dean's representative has the 
responsibility of assuring that the examination is 
conducted according to established procedures. Any 
disagreement over the examination procedures is 
referred to the Dean's representative for decision. 

The time and place of the examination are estab- 
lished by the chairman of the committee. The stu- 
dent is responsible for distributing a complete copy 
of the dissertation to each member of the committee 
at least ten days before the examination. 

All final oral examinations are open to all mem- 
bers of the Graduate Faculty. After the examination 
the committee deliberates and votes in private. Two 
or more negative votes constitute a failure. The can- 
didate may present himself for the final oral exami- 
nation only twice. 

Additional Requirements 

In addition to the above requirements, special de- 
partmental or collegiate requirements may be im- 
posed, especially for those degrees which are 



offered in only one department, college, or division. 
For these special requirements, consult the descrip- 
tions which appear under the departmental or col- 
legiate listing in this catalog or the special 
publications which can be obtained from the depart- 
ment, college, or division. 

Graduate School Requirements for 
the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy 

The Doctor of Philosophy Degree is granted only 
upon sufficient evidence of high attainment in schol- 
arship and the ability to engage in independent re- 
search. It is not awarded for the completion of 
course and seminar requirements no matter how 
successfully completed. 

Residence 

See requirements for all doctoral degrees. 

Foreign Language Requirement 

A number of departments have a foreign language 
requirement for the Doctor of Philosophy degree. 
The student should inquire in the department regard- 
ing this requirement. The student must satisfy the 
departmental or program requirement before he can 
be admitted to candidacy for the doctorate. 

Program 

There is no Graduate School requirement for a spe- 
cific number of course credits in either a major or 
a minor subject. It is the policy of the Graduate 
School to encourage the development of individual 
programs for each student who seeks the Ph.D. To 
that end the academic departments and interdisci- 
plinary programs have been directed to determine 
major and minor requirements, levels or sequences 
of required courses, and similar requirements for 
submission to the Graduate Council for approval. 

Admission to Candidacy 

See requirements for all doctoral degrees. 

Dissertation 

The ability to do independent research must be 
demonstrated by an original dissertation on a topic 
approved by the department or program. 

During the preparation of the dissertation, all 
candidates for the Doctor of Philosophy degree 
must register for a minimum of 12 semester hours 
of doctoral research (899) at the University of 
Maryland. 

Final Examination 

See requirements for all doctoral degrees. 

Requirements for the Degree of 
Doctor of Education 

The requirements for the Doctor of Education (Ed.D.) 
degree are for the most part the same as those for 
the Doctor of Philosophy degree in education de- 
partments in the Graduate School. The only differ- 

General Information / 27 



ence lies in the amount of credit for the Ed.D. 
project (6-9 hours) as compared to that required for 
the Ph.D. dissertation (12-16 hours). For details see 
"Statement of Policy and Procedures: Doctoral De- 
grees in Education," issued by the College of Educa- 
tion, as well as requirements for the Ph.D., see 
above, and departmental regulations. 

Requirements for 
Other Doctoral Degrees 

The particular requirements for the degrees of Doc- 
tor of Business Administration and Doctor of Musi- 
cal Arts are given under the corresponding program 
descriptions. 

Commencement 

Applications for the diploma must be filed with the 
Office of Admissions and Registrations within the 
first three weeks of the semester in which the can- 
didate expects to obtain a degree, except during 
summer session. During the summer session, the 
application must be filed during the first week of 
the second summer session. Exact dates are noted 
for each semester and the summer sessions in "Im- 
portant Dates for Advisors and Students." 

If, for any reason, a student does not graduate at 
the end of the semester in which he applies for the 
diploma, he must re-apply for it in the semester in 
which he expects to graduate. 

Academic costume is required of all candidates at 
commencement exercises. Those who so desire may 
purchase or rent caps and gowns at the University of 
Maryland student supply store. Orders must be filed 
eight weeks before the date of commencement but 
may be cancelled later if the student finds himself 
unable to complete the requirements for the degree. 



28 / General Information 



The Graduate Faculty 



Aaron, Henry J., ^^'c'es&c-- z' Ecc-c-cs 

5 A un.-.-ef3.ty 3' Ca.--'o--a ^^ A.-9e«s 1958 MA Hansm 

-- .ersrty. I960 PhD 1963 

A(taini, John O, ■, Assodale Protessor ol Eoonomcs 
A_e., Obe>fn Cotege, 1960: PhD . Omeistf ol Texas. 1965 

Adams, WMten W, Preiesscir o( MaOiematics 

BX. Umversily o( CaMtxna. Los Angeles. 1959; Pri D , Cokm- 

txaLkifvetsly. 1964. 

Adi i l ma n. bma. Professor of Economcs 

B.S.. Universi«yo«Caifamia. 1950; MA. 1951: Ph-D, 1955 

AdUns, Arthur J, Assoooie Professor at Secondary Educaoor 
B.S.. Sam Cloud Stale Colege. 1942: MA. Umetsty ol kiWv 
nesola. 1947: Ph D . 1958 

Acfcr, Isidore, Professor 0* CTiefTistry 
BA. BrooMyn Colege. 1942: B.S.. New Yor* Unr«s*y. 1943: 
M.S.. Polylecfnc mstimte of Brooidyn. 1947: Ph.D-. 195a 
Aggour. Hotiamed S, Assistant Professor. Civil Engmeermg 
B-S.. Caro UnrveisSy (Egypt). 1964: M.S.. 1966: Pti D , Umer- 
sily o( Washington. 1972. 

Agranrala, AX-, Assoaale Professor of Computer Soencs 
Ph.D.. Harvard Uriversiy. 1970 

Agre, Gene P, Associate Professor o( SooaJ Founoanors o* 

BA. Macatester CoSege. 1951: B S UnrrersHy ol Mvnesota 
1953: MA. Ph.D.. Ureveisiy 01 Brwe. 1964. 

A'Heam, MKtiael F„ Assocale Professor of Astnmorrry 
B.S.. Boston Colege. 1961: Ph.D.. Unveisiiy of Wisconsvi. 
1966. 

Ahem, Dennis KL, Assetart Professor of Ptalosapfiy 

BA. Cornel Unrvetsily. 1968: PIU}.. Univasity of C^ferrn. 

1973. 

Ahrens, Richard A^ Professor of Food and NutrHion and InsHu- 
bonal Admnstration 

B.S.. UnivefSily of Wiscortan. 1958: PI1.D.. Universily of Cd- 
tomia. Oavis. 1963. 

Afeert, Thomas F, Assoctale Professor of Velerwiary Science 
B S.. Pennsytvana State Unrversily. 1958: VMO. Urwersily of 
Pennsytvarta. 1962: Ph.0.. Geotg^mm University. 1972. 

AfcrecW. Peilro A, Assoraal p P i u lt u.:^ of Civi Engineering 

Opl. kig.. Federal Instilufe of Tectnology. Swilzertaid. 1962; 
Ph-D-. Lehigh Unrvetsity. 1972. 

Alexander, James C Assodale Professor of Mathematics and 

Statistics 

BA, The Johns Hopfotrs Uraversity. 1964; Pn,D.. 1968 

Alexander, ILR, Assstant Professor. Ctiernsny 

BA. Harvard Colege. 1964; Pti.0.. Uraversay of Paris, 1967 

AHan, J. OavM^Assistar* Professor of Zoology 

B.Sc.. University of British Coluntiia. 1966: MS . Unnersity of 
Uchigaa 1968: Ph.D.. 1971 

Alan, Thomas, Associate Professor o* Counseing ana Persxi- 
nel Services 

B.S . Nontiwesfem Uraversity. 19S0; MA. University of Mary- 
land. lS64:Ph.D.. 1966. 

AMen. Redfidd W,, Professor of MechsK^ Engneenng 
B.S., Universily of MaylKid. 1953: MS.. 1949: Ph.D.. Uraversity 
of Mniesata. 1959. 

AHey, Catraa O, Jr„ Professor of Ptiysics 
B.S Uraveisily of Richmorvl. 1948: MA. Princeton Uraversity. 
19S1:Ph.D.. 1962- 
Almenas, Kazys K,, Associate Professorof Nudear Engineenng 
B.a. University of Netxasta. 1957: Ph.D . Urmersity w«j Poly- 
technic of Warsaw. 1968 

Aknon, Ctopper, Jr„ Professor of Ecommics 

A.B.. Vandertm Uraversity. 1956: MA. Haiv»d University 

1961:Ph.D. 1962 

AMhoff, Saly A, Assista* Professor of HeaMi Education 
B.S.. Bowing Green State Uraveisily. 1966; MEd.. Uraversity of 
Toledo. 1968: PhD.. 1971. 

Amershek, Kathleen G., Assoaafe Professorof Eaity Chid- 
hood and Qententary FrIiw'HIiiJit 

B.S.. State Teadieis Colege. 19S1 : M.Ed.. Pennsylvaraa State 
Unrversily, 1957: Pti.0.. Uraversity of Mraiesola. 1965 

Ammon, Herman L, Professor of Ctiemctry 

ScB.. Brown University. 1958: Ph,0., Uraveisily of Washmglon. 

1962 

Anaml, Davinilef K^ P i u fe v^ of M o ch an i c iil Engineering 

B.S George Wastangton University. 1959; MS.. 1961; D. Sc. 
1965 

Anastos, Gi'CMi|i', Professor of Zoology 

B.S.. Umersity of Akron. 1942: MA. Harvard University. 1947: 

Ph.D.. 1949. 

Ander so n, Cart R^ Assistant Professor of Busviess and Man- 

B.S.. The PermsyVaraa State Urwersity. 1969: MBA. 1971; 
Ph.D.. 1974 

Andetaon, Charles R-, Associate Professor of Secondevy Edu- 
cation and Asstslart Dean of Ihe Colege of Education 
B.S.. Universily of Maiyland. 1957; MEd.. 1959: Ed.D.. 1969. 



Anderson. Henry, Professor of Busness and Management 

BA Unrversity of London. 1939: MBA. ColiiTOia Umversrty 

1948; PhD. 1959 

AiNlerson, J. Psul, Professor of A<ti«iisuj|ioa Supervision. 

and CumdAjm 

B S Unrversity Of Mrmesota 1942: MA. 1948: Ph D . i960 

Anderson. J. Rotiert. Associate Professor of Physics 
B S , Stale Unrversity o( Iowa. 1956, Ph.D.. 1963 

Andersoa John 0„ Jr.. Professor and Charman of Aerospace 

Engineenng 

B S University o( Flonda 1959. Ph D . Oh« State Universily. 

1966 

Andetsorv Nancy S., Professor of Psychology 

BA. University of Colorado. 1952: MA. Oh« State Umversity. 

19S3;Ph.D.. 1956 

Ander s on, Stephen C, Assetant Professor of Recreation 
B S.. Inciana Stale Uraversity. 1969: MS. Appalachian State 
Uraversrty, 1973: PhD.. Uraversity of Maytand, 1976. 

Anderson, Thornton K, Professor of Government and PoMks 
A.B.UraversityofKei«icl<y.ia37:MA.1938:PhO University 
of Wisconsin. 1948 

Ansello. Edward F, Asssant Professor. Institute lor Child 

StLKIy 

AB Boston College. 1966:MEd..Uraversityof Hfcsouri. 1967; 

Ph.D.. 1970- 

AnHnan, Stuart S., Professor of Mattiemalics 

B.S . Hensselaer Polytechnic Institute. 1961. MS . University 

of Mnnesota 1963: PhD.. 1963. 

Aimstrong, Eariene, Assstant Professor. Entomology 

B-S.. North Carolina Central Uraversity. 1969: MS . 1970: Ph D . 

Cornel University. 1975. 

Aimstrong, Ronald W., Professor of Mechanical Engineenng 
B.E.S.. The Johns Hoplons University. 1955: M.Sc . Cameg«- 
M o l o n University. 1957: Ph.D.. 1958. 

Araenault, Richard J, Professor of Chemical Engineenng and 
Engineeiwig tilaterials 

B.S.. MKhjgan Technological Unnersity, 1957: Ph.0.. North- 
western University. 1962. 

Aahlocfc, Rotiert 8., Professor of Eaty Oaktnad and Elemen- 
taiy Education 

B.S . Butler Univefsity. 1957. MS . 1959: Ed.D.. Indiana Univer- 
sity. 1965 

Ashmen, Roy, Associate Professor of Business and Manage- 
ment 

B S.. Drexel Institute of Technology. 1935: M.S., Coliiiit» Uni- 
versity. 1936: PhD.. Norttiwestem Uraversity. 1950 

Atchison, WiWam F., Piofesscv of Computer Science 

A.B . Georgetown Colege (Ky.). 1936: MA. University of Ken- 

tudcy. 1940;Ph.D.. Univeisityof ICnois. 1943. 

Auslander, Joseph, Professor of Mathematics 

B.S.. Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 1952; MS . Univer- 
sity of Peraisytvaiia 1953; Ph.D.. 1957 

Austin, Giliefl, Lecturer in Secondary Education 
8.S.. Central Connecticut State Colege. 1953; MALS., Wesley- 
ai Univetsity. 1956; CAG.S., Universily of Hartlbrd. 1959: 
Ph.D., Uraversity of Comecbcut 1965. 

Austing, Richard K. Associate Professor of Computer Science 
B.S.. Xavier Uraversity. 1953; MS.. Sant Louis University. 1955; 
Ph.D.. Calhoic University of America. 1963. 

Avery, W il i am T., Professor and Chairman of Classical Lan- 
guages and Uterabxes 

BA. Western Resene Uraversity. 1934; MA. 1935. PhD. 
1937 

Ajtiey. Jofm H„ Prtjfessor of Agronomy 
BA University of Wisconsin. 1937: P»i.D.. 1945 

Ayars, James E.. Assistartt Professrx. Agricullurai Engwieenng 
BAE Comet Unrversity. 1965: MS . Colorado Stale Univer- 
sity, 1973; Ph.D.. 1976. 

Aycock, Marvin IC, %lr.. Associate Professor of Agronomy 
8.S.. Norih Caroina Stale University, 1959: MS . 1963: Ph , 
kma Stale University. 1966. 

Ayhirard, Thomas J., Professor and Ctiannan of Speech and 

Dramatic Art 

B S , University of Wisconsin. 1947 MS , 1949: Ph D . 1960 

Etalxislta. Ivo, Research Professor. Institute for Physical Sci- 
ence and Technology and Maltiemalics 
D<il Ing,. Technical Uraversity of Prague. 1949: Pti.D., 1960 
PhD . Czechostovak Academy of Soences, 1955: PhD.. 1960 

Bagchi, Amilabha, Assistant Professor of Ptiysics 

B.Sc.. Calcutta Unveisrty. 1964; MS.. Unmersity of Caifbmia, 

San Diego, 1967; Ph.D.. 1970 

Bailey, Martin J., Professor of Economics 

BA. Unnrersity of CaMomia. Los Angeles. 1951; MA. The 

Johns Hopkins University. 1953; Ph.D.. 1956. 

Bailey, WiMam J., Research Professor of Chemistry 
B.Chem.. University of Mmnesola 1943; Ph.D . University of II- 
bnos. 1946 

Da ird. Janet R, Assistant Professor of Secondary Education 

and Spanish and Portuguese. 

B.S.. Unrversity of Kansas, 1966; MA. 1971; Ph.D., 1973. 



Baird, Joan C. Assistant Professor of Secondary Education 
B S . Kansas Stale University. 1956: M.S.. 1960: Ed.D.. Okla- 
homa Stale University. 1969 

Baker, OonaM J., Associate Professor of Hearing and Speech 

Sciences 

BS Ed Ohio Slate University. 1954; MA, 1956; PhD , 1962 

Baker, Rotiert L, Associate Professor of Horticulture 

BA, Swanhmore College. 1959; MS, University ol Marylav] 

1962; Ph D , 1965 

Bandel, Verrxm A., Associate Professor of Agronomy 
B.S , Unrversity of Maryland. 1959: MS, 1962: Ph.D.. 1965. 

Banerjee, Manoj K., Professor of Ptiyscs 

8 S Patna University, 1949; MS . Cakxitta University. 1951; 

Ph D, 1956 

Bankson. NictMlas W.. Associate Professor and Acting Chair- 
man of Hearing and Speech Sciences 
BS.. Unrversity ol Kansas. 1960; MA. 1961. PhD. 1970. 

Baras, Jofm S., Assistant Professor ol ElectncaJ Engineering 
Diptoma. Na&onal Technical University of Athens. 1970: S.M.. 
Harvard University. 1971: Ph D . 1973. 

Barbarin. Oscar, Assistant Professor of Psychokigy 
A B St Josephs Seminary College, 1968; MA. New Yortt Uni- 
versity. 1971 M S. Rutgers University. 1973; Ph.D . 1975. 

Bartier, Willard F., Lecturer in Government and Politics 

AB Stanford University. 1928, M A,. 1929; D^jloma. The War 
College, 1948 

Banjasis. Angelo, Assooate Professor of Physics 

AB , Cornell University, 1957; MS . University of Illinois. 1959: 

PhD , 1962. 

Barlow. Jewel B.. Associate Professor of Aerospace Engineer- 



Bames. Jack C. Associate Professor of English 

8-A., Duke University. 1939: MA. 1947; PhD., University ol 

Maryland 1954 

Bamett Audrey J., Associate Professor of Zookigy 

BA., Wilson College. 1955; M.A.. Indiana University. 1957; 

Ph D , 1962. 

Bamett. Neal M., Assooate Professor of Botany 

B S PLrdue Ur-iversity 1959 Ph D , Duke Unrversity, 1966 

Barrett James E., Associate Professor of Psychotogy 

B-A.. University of Maryland, 1966, Ph D,. Pennsylvania State 

Unrversity. 1971 

Barry, Jackson C, Associate Professor of English 

8A. Yale College. 1950: M.A.. Cokimtjia University. 1951: 

M F A , Western Resenie University. 1962: Ph D . 1963 

BarUett, Claude J„ Professor and Chairman of Psycfiotogy 
B.S . Denisoo Unrversity. 1954: MA. Ohio State University. 
1956; Ph.D. 1959, 

Basfum, Ray S., Assooate Professor of Electncal Engineenng 
8 S , US Military Academy, 1945: MS . Unrversity of ICnoe. 
1952. Ph D . 1962. 

Basili, Victor H.. Assooate Professor of Computer Science 
B S Forflham College. 1961; MS Syracuse University. 1963; 
Ph 0,, Unrversity of Texas, 1970 

Beall, Edgar F.. Assooate Professor of Physics 

8 A University of CaJifomia at Berkeley. 1958. Ph.D . 1962 

Beall. Otho T., Jr., Professor of Amencan Studies 

BA WcNams College. 1930: MA, University ol Minnesota. 

1932, Ph.D , Unrversity of Pennsylvania. 1952, 

Bean, George A, Assooate Professor of Botany 
BS Cornell Unrversity, 1958. M S , University ol Minnesota. 
I960, PhD.. 1963- 

Beard, Larry H,, Assistant Professor of Business and Manage- 
ment 
A 8 J University ol Georgia. 1964; MA. 1965. Ph 0., 1974. 

Beasley. Maurine H., Assistant Professor. CoOege of Jour- 
nalism 

B A . University of Mrssoun, 1958, B J 1958; MS , Cokimtjia 
University 1963, Ph D . George Washington University. 1974. 

Beaton. John H.. Dean. College of Human Ecotogy and Profes- 
sor, Food, Nutrition and Institutional ArJministration 
8 A . University of Toronto, 1949; MA. 1950: Ph.D.. 1952 

Beatty, Ctiarles J., Associate Professor of Industnal Educa- 
tion 

B S l*xthem Michigan University. 1959: MA Michigan State 
University. 1963. Ph.D . OhK) Slate University. 1966 

Beckmann, Rotjett B., Dean of the College ol Engineenng and 

Professor of Chemicaf Engineenng 

B.S . Unrversity of Illinois. 1940: Ph.D.. University of Wisconsin. 

1944, 

Bedingfield. James P„ Assooate Professor of Business aid 

Management 

B S Univer&t> of Maryland, 1966, M B.A-. 1968; OB.A.. 1971. 

Beicken, Peter U., Associate Professor Germanic and Slavic 

Languages 

Mag. Art..UniversityofMunich(Gemiany), 1968, PhD. Stanford 

University. 1971. 



Graduate Faculty / 29 



Betcher, Ralph L, Lecturef and Reactor Director. Nuclear Engi- 
neering 

BS . Marshall University. 1941; M.S.. Unrversrty of Kentucky. 
1947; Ph.D.. Unrversrty ol Maryland. 1966 

Bell, Rogef A., Professor of Astronomy 

B.S.. Universrty of Meltxxime. 1957; PhD . Australian National 

University, 1962 

Bellama, Jon M., Associate Professor of Chemistry 
A.B . Allegheny College. 1960; Ph.D.. University ol Pennsyl- 
vania. 1966. 

Bellows, William, Assistant Professor of Agncuttural and Re- 
source Economics 

A.B . Harvard College. 1959; M.S . University ol Massachusetts. 
1968; PhD. 1971 

Belz. Herman J., Associate Professor of History 
B.A-. Pnnceton Universrty. 1959; M.A.. Universrty ol Washington. 
1963; PhD . 1966 

Bender, Filmore E., Professor of Agncurtural and Resource 
Economics 

B.S.. University of California. Bert<eley. 1961 ; MS.. North Caro- 
lina Stale Universrty at Raleigh. 1965. Ph.D.. 1966. 

Benedetto, John J., Professor of Mathematics 

B.A.. Boston College. 1960; M.A.. Harvard University. 1962; 

PhD . Unrversrty of Toronto. 1964 

Benedict, William S., Director, Chemical Physics 
B.A.. Cornell Unrversrty. 1928; MA . PhD, Massachusetts Insti- 
tute of Technology, 1933. 
Benesch. William, Professor, Institute for Physical Science 

and Technology 

B A Lehigh University, 1942; MA., The Johns Hopkins Univer- 
sity. 1950 Ph D . 1952 

Beni>en, Lawrence H., Professor ol Physics 

B.A., Bnx)klyn College. 1951; MS. Universrty of Maryland. 

1955; PhD . Rutgers Universrty. 1958 

Benr)en, Robert L, Associate Professor ol Economics 
B A. Unrversrty ol Texas. 1951. MA . 1955; Ph D.. 1963. 

Bennett Stanley W., Associate Professor, Institute for ChiW 

Study 

BS . Iowa State Universrty. 1959. M A . State Universrty ol Iowa, 

1961 ; PhD . Universrty ol Michigan. 1970 

Berenstein, Carlos A., Associate Professor of Mathematics 
bcendiado en Malematicas, Universrty of Buenos Aires, 1966, 
M.S., New Yon< Universrty, 1969; Ph D , 1970 

Berg, Kenneth R., Associate Professor of Mathematics 
B.S., Unrversrty of Minnesota, 1960; PhD , 1967 

Berger, Bruce S., Professor of Mechanical Engineenng 
B,S., University of Pennsylvania, 1954, M.S.. 1958. PhD . 1962 

Bergeron, Raymond, Assistant Professor. Chemistry 

A.B . Clart< Universrty. 1967. Ph.D.. Brandeis University. 1973 

Bergmann, Bartiara R., Professor of Economics 

B.A.. Cornell Universrty. 1948. M.A.. Harvard Universrty. 1955. 

Ph D . 1959 

Berman, Joel H., Professor of Music 

B.S.. JuilliardSchool ol Music. 1951 ; M.A.. Columbia Universrty. 

1953; DM A.. Unrversrty of Michigan. 1961 

Berman, Louise M„ Professor ol Administration, Supen/ision 

and Cumculum and Director of Nursery-Kindergarten School 

A.B , Wheaton College, 1950; M.A.. Columbia Universrty. 1953. 

Ed.D . Columbia University. 1960 

Bernstein, Allen R„ Professor ol Mathematics 

B A , California Instrtute ol Technology, 1962; MA.. Universrty of 

California at Los Angeles, 1964, Ph D , 1965. 

Bernstein, IMelvIn, Administrative l^an for Summer Programs 
and Professor of Music 

A.B . Southwestern at Memphis. 1947; 8 Music. 1948; M. Muse. 
Unrversrty of Michigan. 1949; MA.. Universrty ot North Carolina. 
1954. PhD . 1964 

Bemthal, John E., Assistant Professor ol Heanng and Speech 

Saences 

B.F A.. Wayne State College. 1962; M.A.. Kansas Universrty. 

1964. Ph D . Universrty of Wisconsin. Madison. 1971 

Best, Otto F., Professor of Germanic arxl Slavic Languages 
Atirtur. Realgymnasium. 1948; Certificate. Universite de Tou- 
kxjse, 1951; Doctor of Phitosophy, Universrty of Munich, 1963 

Bests, Charles Edward, Assoaate Professor of Horticurture 
B.S-. Purdue Unrversrty. 1961; MS . 1969, Ph.D., 1971 

Betancourt, Roger R., Associate Professor of Economics 
B A-, Georgetown Universrty, 1965; PhD . Universrty of Wiscon- 
sin. 1969 

Bhagat, Satindar M„ Professor of Physics 
B A . Jammu and Kashmir Unrversrty of India, 1950; M.A.. Uni- 
versrty ol Delhi. 1953; Ph D . 1956. 

BIckley, William E., Professor of Entomotogy 
BS .Unrversrty of Tennessee. 1934; M.S.. 1936; PhD .Universi- 
ty of Maryland. 1940 

Bigbee, Daniel E., Associate Professor ot Poultry Science 
BS, Oklahoma StateUniversrty, 1956;M S„ 1958;Ph D , Michi- 
gan State Universrty, 1962 



Blllig, Frederick S., Lecturer in Aerospace Engineenng 

BE.. The Johns Hopkins University. 1955; M S., Universrty of 

Maryland. 1958. Ph D . 1964 

Binqham, Alfred, J., Professor of French and Italian 

B a' Yale University. 1933. Ph D.. Columbia Universrty. 1939 

Birdsall, Esther K., Associate Professor of English 

B.A.. Central Michigan College. 1947; MA. University of Anzo- 

na. 1950. Ph D . University ol Maryland. 1959 

Birk, Janice M,, Associate Professor of Counseling and Person- 
nel Services and Counselor, Counseling Center 
B A , Sacred Heart College. 1963; M A . Loyola College. 1966. 

Ph D . Universrty of Missoun. 1970 

Btrkner, Francis B., Assoaate Professor of Civil Engineenng 
B S.. Newark College of Engineenng 1961; MS.E,, Universrty of 
Ronda, 1962; Ph D , 1965. 

Bish, Robert L., Associate Professor of Urtjan Studies 
B A., Universrty of Southern California, 1964, M A.. Indiana Uni- 
versrty. 1966. Ph.D. 1968 

Btair, Donald James, Assistant Professor of Chemical Engi- 
neenng 

BS. Bradley University. 1957. M.S. Universrty of Flonda. 
Gainesville. 1962; PhD . University of Maryland. 1969 

Blair, John D., Assistant Professor ol Sociotogy 

BA. Gustavus Adolphus College. 1966; MA.. Universrty of 

Michigan, 1972; Ph D . 1975 

Blevins, Dale Glenn, Assistant Professor of Botany 

BS . Southwest Missoun State University. 1965; MS. Missoun 

University. 1967, PhD . University of Kentucky, 1972. 

Block, Ira, Assistant Professor of Textile and Consumer Eco- 
nomics 
BS., University of Maryland. 1963; PhD . 1971. 

Bloom, Paul N., Assistant Professor of Business and Manage- 
ment 

B S., Lehigh University. 1968. M BA,. Universrty ol Pennsylva- 
nia. 1970. PhD . Northwestern Universrty. 1974 

Bluth, Linda Fran, Assistant Professor of Psychology and 
Special Education 

BA . College ol Empona. 1965. MS . Kansas State Teachers 
College 1966 Ed D . Universrty of Illinois. 1972 

Bobko, Philip, Assistant Professor. Psychology 

B S.. Massachusetts Instrtute of Technology. 1970; MS. Buch- 

nell University. 1972. Ph D . Cornell Universrty. 1976 

Bobrow, Davis B., Professor and Chairman of Government and 
Politcs 

B A., University ot Chicago, 1955, B.A.. 1956; B.A., Oxford Uni- 
versrty. 1958; Ph D.. Massachusetts Instrtute of Technotogy. 
1961 

Bode, Carl, Professor of English 

Ph.B . Universrty of Chicago. 1933; M.A . Northwestern Universi- 
ty. 1938. PhD.. 1941 

Bolsaitis, Peter P., Professor of Chemical Engineenng 

BS California Instrtute of Technology, i960. M S. 1961: Ph.D., 

Delaware Stale College, 1964 

Bonar. Dale B,. Assistant Professor Zoology 

BA . Whitman College. 1967; M.S.. Universrty of the Pacific. 

1970; PhD . University ot Hawaii. 1973 

Bottino. Paul J., Associate Professor of Botany 

8 8 . Utah State Universrty. 1964. MS . 1965.PhD.. Washington 

State Universrty, 1969 

Boughner, Robert F., Assistant Professor ol Classical Lan- 
guages and Literature 

B.A. Duke University. 1968; MA.. Johns Hopkins Universrty. 
1969. PhD . 1975 

Bowers, Mollie H,, Assistant Professor of Business and Man- 
agement 

B.A.. University ot Rochester. 1967; M.A.. University of Wiscon- 
sin. 1969. Ph D . Cornell University. 1974 

Bouwkamp, John C, Associate Professor of Horticulture 
B.S.. Michigan State Universrty. 1964. M.S.. 1966; Ph.D., 1969 

Boyd, Alfred C, Jr., Associate Professor of Chemistry 

BS . Canisius College. 1951. MS.. Purdue Universrty, 1953, 

PhD . 1957 

Boyd, Derek A.. Assistant Professor. Physics and Astronomy 

B S-. University ol Cape Town (S. Atnca). 1964; B S . (Hons.). 

1965, M Sc , 1967, PhD, Stevens Institute olTechnology, 1973 

Boyd, Vivian S., Assistant Professor, Counseling and Personnel 

Services 

B A , Antioch College, 1961; MA., University ol Colorado, 1968, 

MA, Universrty of Maryland, 1972; PhD , 1975 

Brabble, Elizabeth W.. Associate Professor, Family and Com- 
munity Development 

BS , Virginia Stale College 1960;MS , Pennsylvania Stale Uni- 
versity, 1966, Ed.D . 1969 

Brace, John W.. Professor of Mathematics 

B A , Swarthmore College, 1949, AM . Cornell Universrty. 1951; 

Ph D . 1953 

Bradbury, Utiles L, Assistant Professor of History 

A B , Han/ard University. 1960; AM . 1961; Ph.D.. 1967 

Braddock, Jomills H., II, Assistant Professor of Sociology 
BA . Jacksonville University. 1969. MS.. Flonda State Universi- 
ty. 1972; Ph D , 1973. 



Brandt John C, Professor of Astronomy 

A.B . Washington University. 1956; Ph.D.. University of Chicago, 

1960 

Brauth, Steven E., Assistant Professor of Psychotogy 

BS . Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. 1967; Ph.D.. New York 

University. 1973 

Breger, Irving A., Professor ot Chemistry 

BS . Worchesier Polytechnic Instrtute. 1941. S.M . Massachu- 

sens Instrtute of Technology. 1947; PhD . 1950. 

Breslow, Marvin A., Associate Professor of History 

BA . University ol Nebraska. 1957; M.A.. Harvard Universrty. 
1958; PhD., 1963 

Brigham, Bruce W., Assoaate Professor ol Secondary Educa- 
tion 

8 S , State University of New York, 1949; M.S.. Temple Universi- 
ty. 1967. Ph.D.. 1967. 

Brill, Dieter R., Professor of Physics 

B A . Pnnceton University. 1954; M.A.. 1956; Ph.D.. 1959 

Brinkley, Howard J., Professor ol Zook>gy 

B S West Virginia University. 1958: MS . Universrty ol Illinois. 

1960: Ph.D.. 1963. 

Brodsky, Harold, Associate Professor of Geography 

BS-. Brooklyn College. 1954; MS . Universrty of Colorado, 

1960; Ph D , Universrty ol Washington, 1966. 

Broome, C. Rose, Assistant Professor of Botany 

BS . University of Miami. 1965: AM,. Universrty of South Fton- 

da. 1968: Ph.D.. Duke University. 1974 

Brown, Charles C, Assistant Professor o( Economics 
B.A . Boston College. 1970:M.A.. 1970; Ph.D.. Hanrard Universi- 
ty. 1974. 

Brown, John H., Associate Professor of Philosophy 

A B . Pnnceton University, 1952; M.A . 1957; Ph.D.. 1959. 

Brown, Joshua R.C.. Professor of Zoology 

A.B . Duke University. 1948. M.A.. 1949; PhD . 1953. 

Brown, Richard H., Visrting Associate Professor of Sociology 
B.A . University of California. Berkeley. 1961; M.A.. Columbia 
University. 1965: Ph.D.. University of California at San Diego. 
1973. 

Brown, Robert A., Assoaate Professor of Psychology 

B.A.. University of Richmond. 1958: M.A.. Universrty ol towa. 

1961; PhD , 1962. 

Brown, Samuel E., Assoaate Professor of English 
A.B . Indiana Universrty. 1934; M.A.. 1946. PhD . Yale Universi- 
ty. 1955 

Brush, Steplien G., Professor of History arxi Research Profes- 
sor 
B A.. Harvard Universrty. 1955; D.Phil. Oxford Universrty. 1958. 

Bryer, Jackson R., Professor ol English 

B.A . Amherst College. 1959: M.A . Columbia Universrty, 1960, 

PhD . University ol Wisconsin. 1%5. 

Buchler, Edward R., Assistant Professor of Zooksgy 
B S., California State Polytechnic College. 1964; M.S.. Universi- 
ty of California. 1966; Ph.D.. Universrty ol Montana. Missoula, 
1972. 

Buck, Allen C, Associate Professor of Textile and Consumer 

Economics 

B S . Michigan State University. 1939; M.S.. Western Reserve 

University. 1942; PhD . 1947 

Buckley, Frank T., Jr., Associate Professor of Mechanical Engi- 
neenng 
BS.. Universrty ot Maryland. 1959; PhD. 1968 

Bundy, Mary Lee, Professor. College ot Library and Informa- 
tion Services 

BE . State University ol New York at Potsdam. 1948; MA. Uni- < 
versify of Denver. 1951 ; Ph.D.. University of Illinois. 1960. 

Bunts, Frank, Professor of Art 

BS . Case Westem Reserve Universrty. 1963; Diploma. Cleve- 
land Instrtute of Art. 1964; M.A.. Case Westem Reserve Univer- 
sity. 1964 

Burger, Mary M.W., Assistant Professor of English 

B A . AM and N. College. 1959: MA . Cotorado State University, 

1961 ; Ph.D.. Washington University. 1973. 

Buric, John, Associate Professor ol Animal Science 4 

BS . West Virginia University. 1948. M.S.. University ot Mary- 
land 1952. Ph D . University of Illinois, i960. 

Burt, Gordon W., Associate Professor of Agronomy 

B.S.. Tennessee Technological Institute. 1961. M.S. Cornell 

University. 1964. PhD . Washington State University. 1967. 

Burt John J., Professor and Chairman. Department of Hearth 

Education 

B A.. Duke University. 1955. MEd . Universrty of North Carolina. 

1956. M S . Oregon State University, i960: Ed D . 1963 

Butler, Lillian C, Associate Professor of Food and Nutntion i 

BS . Universrty ot Illinois. 1941 . MS. Universrty ol Texas 1945; 
Ph D . University of California. Berkeley. 1953. 

Butler, Richard Roy, Assistant Professor. Institute of Cnminal I 

Justice and Cnminology ] 

B A . William Carey College. 1967. MA.. Mississippi Stale Uni- 'I 

versify. 1970; Ph.D.. 1973. J 



30 / Graduate Faculty 



Butterworth, Charles E., Associate Professor of Government 

and Politics 

B.A., Michigan State University, 1959; Doctorat. University of 

Nancy, France, 1961; M.A., University of Ctiicago. 1962: Ph D , 

1966 

Byrne, Richard H., Professor of Counseling and Personnel 
Services 

A-B., Franklin & Marsfiall College, 1938; MA.. Columbia Univer- 
sity, 1947: EdD , 1952 

Cadman. Theodore W., Professor and Director of Chemical 

Engineenng 

B.S. Carnegie-Mellon University. 1962; M.S., 1964; Ph.D.. 1966 

Cain, Jarvis L., Professor of Aghcultural and Resource Eco- 



Calrns, Gordon M., Dean, College of Aghculture and Professor 

of Dairy Science 

B.S.. Cornell University, 1936: M.S., 1938; Ph D.. 1940. 

Callcott, George H., Professor of History 
A.B.. University of South Carolina. 1950;M.A., Columbia Univer- 
sity. 1951; Ph.D.. University of North Carolina, 1956 

Cambridge, Milton H., Assistant Professor. Counseling and 
Personnel Services 

B.A., Queens College, 1969; MS . University of Southern Mis- 
sissippi. 1973; Ph D , 1976 

Campagna, Andrew F., Assistant Professor. French and Ital- 
ian 

A.B., Dartmouth College, 1966, MA., University of Rochester, 
1967, Ph.D.. Washington University. 1975 

CampagnonI, Anthony T., Associate Professor of Chemistry 
A.B.. Northeastern University, 1964; PhD . Indiana University, 
1968. 

Camptjelt, Donald L., Assistant Professor, Veterinary Science 
D V M , University of Georgia, 1968: M.S., Texas Agricultural and 
Mechanical University, 1972 

Campbell, Ehwood G., Professor of Secondary Education 
B S., Northeast Missoun State College. 1949: MA. Northwest- 
ern University, 1952: Ph , 1963 

Campbell, Kenneth, Associate Professor of Art 
Massachusetts College of Art: National Academy of Design; Art 
Students League:Lowell Institute 

Carlsone, Robert P., Professor of Administration, Supen/ision 
and Curriculum 

B.S,. East Montana College. 1953. M Ed . Emory University. 
1958; Ph.D.. University of Chicago. 1961 

Caron, Dewey M., Associate Professor of Entomology 
B A . LJniversity of Vermont. 1964. MS . University of Tennes- 
see. 1966; Ph.D., Cornell University, 1970 

Carr, John C, Associate Professor of Secondary Education 
B.S. Wilson Teachers College. 1952: MP A.. Catholic University 
of Amenca, 1953; Ph D., 1965. 

Carroll, Rotjert M., Assistant Professor of Psychology 
B S., University of New Mexico, 1965, M.A., Ohio Slate Universi- 
ty, 1968; Ph. D, 1969 

Carroll, Stephen J., Jr., Professor of Business and Manage- 
ment 

B.S . University of California at Los Angeles. 1957; M.A.. Univer- 
sity of Minnesota, 1959; PhD . 1964 

Carter, Everett C, Professor and Chairman of Civil Engineenng 
B.S C E,. Virginia Polytechnic Institute, 1958, M S.C E.. Univer- 
sity of California, Berkeley, 1959; Ph.d., Northwestern University. 
1969 

Castellan, Gilbert W., Professor of Chemistry 

B.S,, Regis College, 1945, Ph.D., The Catholic University of 

America, 1949; Sc D , Regis College, 1967 

Cate. George A., Assistant Professor of English 

B.A.. Rutgers University. 1960; M.A., Duke University. 1962. 

PhD . 1968 

Causey, George D., Research Professor of Hearing and Speech 

Sciences 

B.A.. University of Maryland 1950: MA., 1951, Ph.D., Purdue 

University, 1954. 

Celarier, James L., Associate Professor of Philosophy 

A.B.. University of Illinois, 1956. MA, 1958: Ph.D.. University of 

Pennsylvania. 1960, 

Chaiken, Irwin M., Lecturer in Chemistry 

A. B., Brown University, 1964; Ph. D, University of California. Los 

Angeles. 1968. 

Chang, Chla-Cheh, Assistant Professor, Physics and Astron- 
omy 

B.S.. Tughal University (Taiwan), 1961: MA, University of 
Southern California, 1966: Ph D , 1968 

Chang, Chung-Yun, Associate Professor of Physics 
PhD . Columbia University. 1966 

Chant, Nicholas, Assistant Professor of Physics 
Ph D.. Lincoln College. Oxford, 1966 

Chapin, John L., Professor, Institute for Child Study 

A.B.. Denison University, 1939; Ph.D.. University of Rochester. 

1950. 



Chasnoft, Sellna Sue, Assistant Professor of Counseling and 
Personnel Services 

A.B , University of Connecticut, 1957; A.G.S.. University of 
Maryland. 1968: M Ed., 1968, Ph D , 1971. 

Chaves, Antonio F., Associate Professor of Geography 
Doctor, Law, University of Havana, 1941. Doctor of Filosofia & 
Leiras. 1946. MA. Northwestern University. 1948 

Chen, Yung-Gann, Assistant Professor of Physics 
B.S.E.S.. National Taiwan University, 1957; MS.E E,, National 
Chio-Tung University, 1960: D Eng Sci., Columbia University. 
1966 

Christensen, Abel Cheryl J., Assistant Professor. Government 
and Politics 

B.A., University of Minnesota. 1968: Ph.D.. Massachusetts Insti- 
tute of Technology. 1975 

Christian, Charles M., Assistant Professor of Geography and 
Urban Studies 

B.A . Northeastern State College. 1966; MA., University of Illi- 
nois. 1968. PhD. 1975. 

Chu, Hsin, Professor of Mathematics 

B S.. Hupeh Teachers College. 1948: M.S.. Tulane University. 

1957; Ph D.. University of Pennsylvania. 1959. 

Chu, Yaohan, Professor of Computer Science and Electncal 
Engineering 

B.S.. Chiao-Tung University. 1942, M.S . Massachusetts Insti- 
tute of Technology. 1945: Sc D.. 1953. 

Churaman, Charlotte V., Assistant Professor of Family and 
Community Development 

B.S , Berea College. 1942: M.Ed.. Penn State University. 1964; 
Ed.D . 1969 

Church, Kenneth R., Associate Professor of Physical Education 
and Recreation 

B.S.. University of Northern Iowa. 1946.M S . University of Iowa. 
1955. PhD . Indiana University. 1963. 

Church, Marilyn G., Associate Professor. Eariy Childhood and 

Elementary Education 

B S . Indiana University. 1962: MS . 1963: Ed D.. 1969 

Churchill, John W., Associate Professor of Recreation 
B.S . State University of New Yori( at Cortland, 1958: MS., Uni- 
versity of Illinois, 1959, Ph D,, University of Wisconsin, 1968 

Cirrincione, Joseph M., Associate Professor of Secondary Edu- 
cation and Geography 

B.S.. Slate University of New York at Oswego, 1962; M.A.. 
Ohio State University. 1967, Ph.D.. 1970. 

Clague. Christopher K.. Associate Professor of Economics 
B A.. Swarthmore College. 1960; Ph.D., Harvard University, 
1966 

Clague, Monique W., Assistant Professor of Administration, Su- 
pervision and Curriculum 

B A., Swarthmore College. 1959. PhD.. Harvard University, 
1969 

Ciaiborn, William L., Assistant Professor of Psychology 
B.A.. University of Rochester. 1964. M.A.. Syracuse University. 
1968: Ph.D.. 1968 

Oarit, Eugenie, Professor of Zoology 

B.A.. Hunter College, 1942, M.A., New Yori( University. 1946: 

PhD , 1951 

Clark, Joseph E., Visiting Associate Professor of Textiles and 
Consumer Economics 

B.S. Villanova University. 1958; M.S.. 1960: Ph.D.. University of 
Windsor. Canada. 1963 

Clark, Neri A., Professor of Agronomy 

B S . University of Maryland. 1954: Ph D . 1959. 

Clarke, David H., Professor of Physical Education 

B S., Spnngfield College. 1952: MS.. 1953: Ph D., University of 

Oregon. 1959 

Claude, Richard P., Associate Professor of Government and 
Politics 

B.A.. College of St Thomas. 1956. MS.. Florida State Univer- 
sity. 1960; Ph D . University of Virginia, 1964 

Clearwater, Harvey E., Associate Professor, Health Education 
A.B . Stale University of New Yort< at Albany. 1955: MA.. Michi- 
gan Slate University. 1967: Ed D.. 1970 

Ciemson, Barry A., Assistant Professor of Administration. Su- 
pervision and Curnculum 

B.S. The Pennsylvania Slate University. 1965: MA.. 1968: 
Ph D . 1975. 

Clotfelter, Charles T., Assistant Professor of Economics 
A B . Duke University. 1969: Ph D . Harvard University. 1973 

Cockburn, James S., Professor of History 

L.L.B . Leeds University, 1959. L.L.M . 1961: PhD.. 1970. 

Cohen, Joel, Associate Professor. Mathematics 

Sc B.. Brown University. 1963; Ph D . Massachusetts Institute of 

Technology. 1966. 

Cole, Wayne S., Professor of History 

B.A . Iowa State Teachers College. 1946. MS.. University of 

Wisconsin. 1948; PhD . 1951 

Collier, Robert K., Jr., Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engi- 
neenng 
B.S.. Arizona Stale University. 1965; M.S.. 1972; Ph.D.. 1975 



Coiton, Craig W., Assistant Professor. Recreation 

B S . Brigham Young University. 1963. MS. 1970. Ph D.. 1976. 

Cotville, James, Associate Professor of Civil Engineenng 

B S . Purdue University. 1959. MS . 1960; Ph D.. University of 

Texas. 1970. 

Colwell, Rita Rossi, Professor of Microbiology 

8 S . Purdue University. 1956; M S . 1958. Ph D . University of 

Washington. 1961 

Contrera, Joseph F., Associate Professor of Zoology 
B A . New York University. 1960:MS . 1961; PhD. 1966 

Conway, Mary M., Associate Professor of Government and Poli- 
tics 

B.S.. Purdue University. 1957. MA. University of California, 
Berkeley. 1960: PhD . Indiana University. 1965 

Coogan, Robert, Associate Professor of English 

B.A.. lona College. 1954. M.A.. De Paul University. 1958. Ph.D., 

Loyola University. 1967 

Cook, Clarence H., Professor of Mathematics 
B.A. Slate University of Iowa, 1948: M.S.. 1950. PhD , Universi- 
ty of Colbrado, 1962 

Cook, Thomas M., Associate Professor of Microbiology 

B S.. University of Maryland. 1955: M S . 1957; Ph D.. Rutgers 

University. 1963 

Cooper, Jeffrey M., Associate Professor of Mathematics 

B A , Havertord College. 1962. MS. University of Illinois. 1964; 

Ph D.. 1967 

Cooper, Sherod M., Jr., Associate Professor of English 

B S . Temple University. 1951; M.A.. 1953; Ph.D.. University of 

Pennsylvania. 1963. 

Cortwtt, M. Kenneth, Professor of Botany 

B.S . McGill University. 1960: Ph D.. Cornell University. 1954 

Corliss, John 0., Professor and Chainnan of Zoology 

B.S . University of Chicago. 1944. B.A.. University of Vemiont. 

1947; PhD . New York University. 1951. 

Corning, Gerald D., Professor of Aerospace Engineenng 
B.S.. New York University. 1937. MS . Catholic University. 1954. 

Correl, Ellen, Professor of Mathematics 

B.S . Douglass College. 1951. MS . Purdue University, 1953; 

Ph.D.. 1958. 

Corrlgan, Robert A., Provost. Division of Arts and Humanities 
and Professor of Amencan Studies 

A.B.. Brown University. 1957: M.A.. University of Pennsylvania. 
1959: Ph.D. 1967. 

Corsi, Thomas M., Assistant Professor of Business and Man- 
agement 

B A.. Case Western Reserve University. 1971 ; M.A.. Kent State 
University. 1974. Ph.D , University of Wisconsin at Milwaukee, 
1976, 

Cournyn, John B., Associate Professor of Civil Engineering 
B.S,. University of Alabama, 1946, MS . 1948 

Coursey, Robert D., Associate Professor of Psychology 
B.S.. Spring Hill College. 1966: Ph D . University of Rochester, 
1970. 

Courtwright, Benjamin F., Associate Professor of Infonnation 

Systems Management 

B.A.. Johns Hopkins University. 1939; Ph.D.. 1968. 

Cox, Evelyn M., Associate Professor of Food. Nutrition and In- 
stitution Administration 

MS . Syracuse University. 1948; Ph D . Iowa State University. 
i960. 

Crites, John O., Professor of Psychology 

A.B-. Pnnceton University. 1950; Ph.D.. Columbia University. 

1957 

Cumberland, John H., Professor. Bureau of Business and Eco- 
nomic Research 

B A,. University of Maryland. 1947; M.A., Harvard University, 
1949: PhD . 1951, 

Cunniff, Patrick F., Professor and Chairman of Mechanical 
Engineering 

B S . Manhattan College. 1955; M.S.. Virginia Polytechnic Insti- 
tute. 1956: Ph D . 1962 

Currie, Douglas G., Professor of Physics 

B E.P Cornell University. 1958; Ph D . University of Rochester. 

1962. 

Currier, Albert W., Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

B A . State University of Iowa. 1954, M.A.. The Johns Hopkins 

University. 1959: Ph D.. 1968, 

Curtis, Charles R., Associate Professor of Botany 

B S.. Colorado Stale College, 1961; MS.. 1963. Ph.D.. 1965 

Curtis, John M., Professor of Agncultural and Resource Eco- 
nomics 

BS. North Carolina State College. 1947; M.S.. 1949. Ph.D.. 
University of Maryland. 1961. 

Cussler, Margaret T., Associate Professor of Sociology 
B.A. State University of New Yori< at Albany. 1931;MA,. 1933; 
MA,. Harvard University. 1941; Ph D . 1943 

Oachler, H. Peter, Associate Professor of Psychology 

B S . Richmond Professional Institute. 1963; M.A.. University of 

Illinois. 1968; Ph.D.. 1969 



Graduate Faculty / 31 



Dagalakis. Nicholas G.. Assistant Professor. Mechanical Engi- 

neenng 

Dipl. ol Mech Engr., National Technical University (Greece), 

1969; MS. Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 1971: EngD. 

1973; PhD, 1975. 

Oager. Edward Z., Professor ol Sociology 

B.A., Kent State University. 1950. MA.. Ohio State University, 

1951, Pfi D , 1956 

Dainis, Andrew. Assistant Professor of Physical Education 

B S . University of Adelaide, South Australia, 1962, Ph.D.. 1967: 

MA , University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, 1972 

Dally, James W., Professor of Mechanical Engineering 

BS Camegie Institute of Technology, 1951: MS.. 1953: Ph.D. 

Illinois Institute of Technology, 1958 

Oancis, Jerome, Associate Professor of Mathematics 

B S , Polytechnic Institute of Brooklyn, 1961 : MS , University of 

Wisconsin, 1963; Ph D , 1966 

Oarden. Lindley. Assistant Professor of Philosophy and History 
B A Southwestern at Memphis, 1 968. MA.. University of Chica- 
go 1969; S M , 1973; Ph D . 1974 

Dardis, Rachel, Professor of Textiles and Consumer Economics 
and Lecturer m Economics 

B S St Marys College. Dublin, 1949; MS , University of Min- 
nesota, 1963: PhD,. 1965 

Oavey, Beth, H., Assistant Professor of Secondary Education 
B S , Miami University of Ohio. 1965, M A , University of Roch- 
ester, 1969; PhD., Case Western Reserve University, 1971 

Davidson, James P., Assistant Professor of Vetennary Science 
B S . Michigan State University. 1964; D,V M,. 1966; MS,, 1974, 
Ph D.. 1977 

Davidson, John A., Professor of Entomology 
B A.. Columbia Union College. 1955: M S.. University of Mary- 
land. 1957; PhD.. 1960 

Davidson. Marie S., Assistant Professor. Institute for Child 
Study 

BS. Dillard University. 1959: M.S.. University of Maryland. 
1967; Pfi D , 1971. 

Davidson. Nell, Associate Professor of Secondary Education 
and Assistant Professor of Mathematics 
BS , Case Institute ol Technology, 1961; MS., University of 
Wisconsin, 1963; Ph D , 1970 

Davidson, Ronald C, Professor of Physics 

BSc, McMaster University. 1963; PhD.. Pnnceton University. 

1966 

Davis, Christopher C. Assistant Professor. ElectncaJ Er>gineer- 

,ng 

B.A., Cambndge University, 1965: MA.. 1970: Ph D , Man- 
chester University (England), 1970, 

Davis, Linda S.. Assistant Professor of Psychology 

B A . University of Texas. Austin. 1971 :M.A.. 1974: PhD . 1975 

Davis, Richard F., Professor and Chairman of Dairy Science 
and Animal Science 

BS, University ol New Hampshire. 1950:M,S. Cornell Universi- 
ty, 1952, Ph D 1953 

Davis, Shelley, Assistant Professor of Music 
B A . Washington Square College of New Yorit University, 1957; 
M A , Graduate School of Arts and Sciences of New Yofl^ Uni- 
versity, 1960: PhD, 1971 

Davisson. Lee D., Professor. Electrical Engineenng 
BSE , Pnnceton University, 1958. M S,E,, University ol Cali- 
fornia (Los Angeles), 1961, PhD, 1964 

Dawson, Townes L., Professor of Business and Management 
B B A., University ol Texas. 1943, B S,. United States Merchant 
Manne Academy, 1946. B A University of Texas, 1947; Ph , 
1950; LLB. 1954 

Dawson. Victor. CD., Lecturer in Mechanical Engineenng 
B S Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1948, MS , Har- 
vard University 1951, ME . California Institute of Technology, 
1959, Ph D. University of Maryland. 1963. 

Day, Thomas B., Professor of Physics and Vice Chancellor for 

Academic Planning and Policy 

B S , University of Notre Dame, 1952; PhD . Cornell University. 

1957 

Dayton, Chauncy M., Professor ol Measurement and Statistics 
A B . University of Chicago, 1955, MA. University of Maryland, 
1963, PhD. 1964 

OeBarthe, Jerry v., Assoaate Professor of Animal Science 
B S , Iowa Slate University. 1961. Ph D,. 1966 

Oebro, Julius, Assistant Professor. Institute of Cnminal Justice 

and Cnmtrx)iogy 

B S , University of San Francisco, 1953: M,A . San Jose State 

College 1967 

Decker, A. Morris, Jr., Professor of Agronomy 

B S , Colorado AiM. 1949. MS . Utah State College, 1951; 

Ph D , University ol Maryland. 1953 

DeClaris. Nicholas. Professor of Electrical Engineenng 

B S .Texas ASM University, 1952; S.M, Massachusetts Institute 

of Technology. 1954, Sc D , 1959 

DeLeiris, Alain. Professor ol Art 

B F A , Rhode Island School of Design. 1948: A.M,. Harvard 

University, 1952: Ph D , 1957 



De Lorenzo, William E., Associate Professor of Secondary Edu- 
cation 

B.A , Montclair State College. 1959: MA,. 1964; PhD , Ohio 
State University, 1971. 

Demaitre, Ann, Associate Professor of French and Italian 
B A Columba University. 1950. M A.. University ol California, 
Berkeley, 1951 , MS,. Columbia University. 1952: PhD,, Univer- 
sity ol Maryland, 1960, 

DeMonte. Claudia A.. Lecturer Art 

B.A College of Notre Dame of Maryland. 1969; M.F A.. Catholic 

University of America, 1971 

Denno, Robert F., Assistant Professor. Entomology 

BS , University of California (Davis). 1967: Ph.D.. 1973. 

Denny, Don W.. Professor of An 

B.A . University of Flonda, 1959: MA,. New York University. 

1961, PhD , 1965, 

DeRocco, Andrew, G., Professor ol Institute of Physical Science 
and Technology 

BS, Purdue University. 1951; MS,, University of Michigan. 
1953, PhD., 1957 

Derrick, Frederick W., AssistanI Professor. Textiles and Con- 
sumer Economics 

B S North Carolina Slate University. 1972. MS . 1974; PhD . 
1976 

OeRucher, Kenneth N., Assistant Professor, Civil Engineenng 
BS C E , Tn-Slate College. 1971; MS, University ol North 
Dakota, 1973, Ph D , Virginia Polytechnic Institute. 1976 

Deshler. Walter W., Prolessor of Geography 

B S , Lafayette College, 1943; MA., University ol Maryland, 

1953, Ph D , 1957 

DeSilva, Alan W.. Professor of Physics 
B S , University of California at Los Angeles. 1954: Ph D . Uni- 
versity of California, Beri<eley, 1961 

Dessaint, Alain, Assistant Professor ol Anthropology 

BA, University ol Chicago. 1961. MA,. Stanford University. 

1962, Ph D University of Hawaii, 1972 

Destler, William M., Assistant Professor of Electncal Engineer- 
ing 

BS., Stevens Institute of Technology. 1968: PhD, Cornell Uni- 
versity, 1972, 

Devine. Donald J., Associate Prolessor of Government and 

Politics 

B B A , Saint John s University, 1959; MA . Brooklyn College. 

1965; Ph D , Syracuse University, 1967 

DeVoe Howard J., Associate Professor of Chemistry 

B.A . Oberlin College. 1955, Ph D , Harvard University. 1960 

Dies, Robert R., Associate Professor of Psychology 
B S Carroll College, 1962: M A , Bowling Green State Univer- 
sity. 1964, Ph D , University Of Connecticut, 1968 

Dietz, Maureen A., Associate Professor ol Eariy Childhood and 
Elementary Education 

B S , Creighion University. 1964; MS,. University of Pennsyl- 
vania, 1965, PhD , 1968 

Difederico, Frank Robert, Associate Professor of Art 
B A . University ol Massachusetts, 1955: MA,, Boston Univer- 
sity, 1961 . Ph D . New York University. 1970, 

Diggs, Charles C, Assistant Prolessor. Hearing and Speech 

Sciences 

AB , Loyola College. 1969, MS , Purdue University 1972: Ph D , 

1973 

Dillard, Dudley, Professor of Economics and Provost, Div, of Be- 
havioral and Social Sciences 
B S , University of Califomia. Bert<eley. 1935: Ph.D.. 1940. 

DIttman, Laura L., Professor Institute for Child Study 

B S , University ol Colorado, 1938; MA . University ol Maryland, 

1963 Ph D , 1967 

Dively. Galen P.. Assistant Prolessor of Entomology 

BS. Juniata College. 1966. MS. Rutgers University. 1968, 

Ph D , 1971 

Dixon, Jack R., Associate Prolessor of Physics 

B S , Western Reserve University. 1948; M.S.. 1950. PhD,, Uni 

versify of Maryland, 1956, 

Dodge, Norton T., Associate Professor of Economics 

AB , Cornell University, 1948; MA,. Harvard University. 1951 

Ph D , 1960 

Doetsch, Raymond N., Professor ol Microbiology 

BS,, University of Illinois. 1942. A.M.. Indiana University. 1943; 

Ph D . University of Maryland, 1948, 

Dombeck, Thomas W., Assistant Professor. Physics and As 
tronomy 

B A . Columbia University, 1967; Ph.D.. Northwestern Umver 
sity. 1972. 

Donaldson, Bruce K., Associate Prolessor of Aerospace Engi 
neenng 

B.S.. Columbia University. 1955. MS . Wichita Stale Univer- 
sity. 1962. M S . 1963. Ph D . University ol Illinois at Urbana, 
1968 

Dortman, J. Robert, Professor of Physics and Institute loi 
Physical Science and Technology 
B.A., The Johns Hopkins University. 1957; PhD , 1961 



Dorman, Gary J., Assistant Professor. Economics 

A B , University of Michigan. 1972: Ph.D.. University of Cali- 

lornia. 1976 

Dorsey, John W., Vice Chancellor for Administrative Affairs and 
Professor of Economics 

B S . University of Maryland. 1958: M.A.. Harvard University, 
1962; PhD, 1963 

Dotson, Charles O., Associate Professor of Physical Education 
B A , Morehead State University. 1963, MS,, Purdue University, 
1964; PhD , 1968 

Doudna, Mark E., Assistant Professor of Hearing and Speech 

Sciences 

BS,. Ohio State University, 1948: MA,, 1956; PhD,, 1962 

Douglass, Larry W., Associate Professor of Dairy Science 
B S . Purdue University, 1963; MA, 1966, Ph D , Oregon Slate 
University, 1969 

Douglis, Avron, Prolessor of Mathematics 

A B . University of Chicago, 1938. M.A,, New York University, 

1949; PhD,, 1949 

Dragt, Alexander J., Prolessor and Chairman of Physics 
A B., Calvin College. 1 958 Ph.D.. University of California, Berke- 
ley, 1963 

Drew, Howard Dennis, Associate Professor of Physics 

B S , University of Pittsburgh. 1962; PhD . Cornell University, 

1967 

Driskell, David C, Professor. Art 

A B . Howard University. 1955: M F A . Catholic University of 
America, 1962; Rijksbureau voor Kunsthislorisches Documenta- 
lie. Den Haag (Holland). 1964, 

Dudley, James, Professor of Administration. Supervision and 

Curnculum 

B A., Southern Illinois University, 1951; M.S-. Southern Illinois 

University. 1957, Ed D,, University of Illinois. 1964 

Duffy, Dick, Professor of Chemical Engineering and Nuclear 

Engineering 

B S,. Purdue University, 1939: MS.. University of Iowa. 1940; 

Ph.D.. University of Maryland. 1956. 

Duffey, Robert V., Professor of Eariy Childhood and Elemeritary 

Education 

B S,. Millersville State College. 1938; Ed,M,. Temple University, 

1948; Ed,D, 1954, 

Duffy, John Professor of History 

BA,, Louisana State Nomial College. 1941; MA,. 1943; PhD., 

University of Califomia, 1946, 

Dunn, Norma E., Assistant Professor. English 

B.A,, Madison College, 1946: M,A,. University of Pennsylvania, 

1953, Ph.D., 1968, 

Dutta, Sukanta K., Associate Professor of Veterinary Science 
BSc, (Vet ) Bombay University. India, 1956: MS,, University of 
Minnesota. 1960; Ph D , 1962, 

Dworzecka, Maria, Visiting Assistant Professor of Physics 
MSc, Warsaw University, 1964; PhD,. 1969, 



Edmister, Robert O., Associate Professor of Business and Man- 
agement 

BS,, Miami University. 1964: MB.A,, University of Michigan. 
1965; Ph D,. Ohio State University. 1970, 

Edmundson, Harold P., Professor of Mathematics and Com- 
puter Science 

BA., University of California. Los Angeles. 1946; MA.. 1948; 
Ph D., 1953 

Ehrlich, Gertrude, Professor of Mathematics 

B.S.. Georgia State Ckjilege for Women, 1943: MA,. University 

of North Carolina. 1945: Ph.D,. University of Tennessee. 1953. 

Einstein, Theodore L., Assistant Professor. Physics and As- 
tronomy 

BA,. Harvard University, 1969: MA,. 1969: Ph.D . University ol 
Pennsylvania, 1973, 

Eisenberg, John, Adjunct Profesor ol Zoology 
BS, , Washington Stale University. 1 957; M,A,, University of Cali- 
fornia, Berkeley, 1959. PhD,, 1962 

Elder, Steven D., Assistant Professor ol Germanic and Slavic 
Languages 

B A , Kalamazoo College, 1962; M,A„ Ohio State University, 
1964; PhD , 1969 

Eley, George. Associate Professor of Eariy Childhood Elemen- 
tary Education 
B S . Ohio State University, 1952; MEd,. 1957; PhD.. 1966, 

Eliot, John, Associate Prolessor. Institute lor Child Study 

AB,, Harvard University, 1956; AMT , 1958: Ed,D,. Stanford 

University, 1966 

Elkin, Stephen L, Associate Professor ol Govemment and Politics 

B A , Allred University, 1961; MA,. Ph.D,. Harvard University, 

1969 

Elkins, Earleen F., Research Assistant Prolessor of Hearing 

and Speech Sciences 

B A . University of Maryland. 1954; MA, 1956; Ph D,. 1967 

Elkins, Richard L., Assistant Professor of Industrial Education 
BS,. University of Maryland. 1953. MA,, 1958. Ed,D,, 1972, 



32 / Graduate Faculty 



Elklns, Wilson H., President. University of Maryland 
B.A., University o( Texas, 1932: MA-, 1932. Litl. B . Oxford Uni- 
versity. 1936:0 Phil.. 1936 

Ellingson, Robert G., Assistant Professor of Meteorology 
B,S,. Flonda Stale University. 1967: M.S.. 1968: Ph.D . 1972 

Elltot Teresa G., Assistant Professor, Speecti and Dramatic Art 
B.A., Catholic University of Amenca. 1950: M.C A,, 1970. 

Ellis, Robert L., Associate Professor of Mathematics 
B.A.. Miami University. 1960. Ph.D . Duke University. 1966 

Ellsworth, Robert W., Assistant Professor of Physics 

B.S . Yale University. 1960: Ph.D . University of Rochester. 1965. 

Emad, Fawzi P.. Associate Professor of Electncal Engineenng 
B.S.. American University (Beinjl). 1961. M.S. Northwestern 
University, 1963. Ph.D , 1965 

Ephremides, Anthony, Associate Professor of Electncal Engi- 
neenng 

B.S.. National Technical University of Athens. 1967: MA.. Pnnce- 
ton University. 1969. Ph D . 1971 

Ericl(Son, William C, Professor of Astronomy 

B.A.. University of Minnesota. 1951: MA . 1955, Ph.D.. 1956 

Evans, Emory, Professor and Chairman of History 
B.A.. Randolph-Macon College. 1950: MA.. University of Vir- 
ginia, 1954, Ph.D . 1957 

Evans, Martha C, Assistant Professor. Earty Childhood Ele- 
mentary Education. BA.. Stanford University. 1966: M 8 Ed . 
Indiana University. 1969: Ed.D . 1974. 

Eyier, Marvin H., Dean and Professor. College of Physical Edu- 
cation. Recreation and Health 

A.B., Houghton College, 1942, M.S.. 1942. M.S., University of Il- 
linois, 1948: Ph.D. 1956 

Fain, Gerald S., Assistant Professor. Recreation 
B.S . Spnngfield College, 1969: MS . University of North Caro- 
lina. 1971 

Fatcione, Raymond L., Assistant Professor of Speech and 
Dramatic Art 

BA , Akron University, 1965: M.A.. 1967: Ph.D . Kent State Uni- 
versity. 1972. 

Falk, David S., Professor of Physics 

B.S.. Comell University, 1954, M.S.. Harvard University. 1955: 

Ph.D.. 1959. 

Faller, Alan J., Professor. Institute for Physical Science and 
Technology and Meteorology 

SB.. Massachusetts Institute for Technology, 1951: MS . 1953. 
Sc.D., 1957, 

Fanning, Delvin S., Associate Professor of Agronomy 

B.S.. Comell University. 1954; MS. 1959, Ph.D., University of 

Wisconsin. 1964. 

Farquhar, Douglas James, Associate Professsor of Art 

B A , Washington and Lee University, 1963, M A , University of 

Chicago, 1966: Ph D, 1972 

Farrell, Richard T., Associate Professor of Secondary Educa- 
tion and History 

A-B-, Wabash College, 1954: M.S., Indiana University, 1958: 
Ph.D . 1967 

Felton, Kenneth E., Associate Professor of Agricultural Engi- 
neenng 

BS., University of Maryland, 1950, B.S., 1951: M.S., Pennsyl- 
vania State University. 1962. 

Ferrell, Richard A., Professor of Physics 

BS. , California Institute of Technology. 1948:M S . 1949:Ph D . 

Princeton University. 1952. 

Fey, James T., Associate Professor of Secondary Education 
and Mathematics 

B.S. UniversityofWisconsin. 1962: M.S., 1963: Ph.D., Columbia 
University, 1968 

Fink, Beatrice C, Associate Professor of Freoch and Italian 
BA , Bryn Mawr College, 1953: MA., Yale University, 1956: 
Ph.D.. University of Pittsburgh. 1966. 

Finkelstein, Barbara J., Associate Professor. Social Founda- 
tions of Education 

BA.. Barnard College. 1959: M.A . Teacher's College. Columbia 
University. 1960: Ed.D.. 1970 

Finstert>usch, Kurt, Associate Professor of Sociology 
B.A.. Princeton University. 1957. B.D.. Grace Theological Semi- 
nary. 1960: Ph D . Columbia University. 1969 

Fish, Gertrude S., Assistant Professor of Housing and Applied 

Design 

B.S.. Comell University. 1968: MA. 1970. Ph D . 1973 

Fisher, Anthony C, Professor of Economics 
B A.. Columbia University. 1962. Ph D.. 1968. 
Fivel, Daniel I., Associate Professor of Physics 
BA . The Johns Hopkins University. 1953: Ph D , 1959 

Flack, James K., Jr., Associate Professor of History 

B A . Albion College. 1959:M A . WayneStateUniversity. 1963: 

PhD . 1968 

Flatter, Charles H., Associate Professor, Institute for Child 

Study 

BA., DePauw University, 1961: E.Ed., University of Toledo, 

1965 Ed D , University of Maryland, 1968 



Fleck, Jere, Associate Professor of Germanic and Slavic Lan- 
guages 
Ph D , University of Munich, 1968 

Fleig, Albert J., Jr., Lecturer in Aerospace Engineenng 

B.S E.S-. Purdue University. 1958: Ph D . Catholic University of 

Amenca. 1968 

Florestano, Patricia S., Assistant Professor of Urban Studies 
B A . University of Maryland. 1958: M.A.. 1970. Ph.D . 1974 

Flyger, Vagn, Professor. Zoology 

BS . Comell University. 1948: MS. Pennsylvania State Univer- 
sity. 1952. Sc D . Johns Hopkins University. 1956 

Folsom, Kenr>eth E., Associate Professor of History 

BA,, Pnncelon University, 1943: B A , University of California, 

Beri^eley, 1955, M A , 1957, Ph D , 1964 

Folstrom, Roger J., Professor of Music and Secondary Educa- 
tion 

B S , College of St Thomas, 1956: M Ed , 1959: MM,, North- 
western University. 1963: Ph D.. 1967 

Fonaroff, L. Schuyler, Professor of Geography 
B A . University of Anzona. 1955. PhD . The Johns Hopkins Uni- 
versity. 1961 

Forl)es, Jatrws H., Jr., Associate Professor of Art 
B A.. University of Maryland. 1964: M.A.. 1966. 

Formisarw, Roger A., Assistant Professor of Business and 

Management 

BA . University of New Hampshire. 1971: Ph D . University 

of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 1976. 

Forsnes, Victor G., Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engi- 
neenng 

BES. Bngham Young University. 1964. ME. 1965: PhD. 
Purdue University. 1970 

Foss, John E., Professor of Agronomy 
B S . Wisconsin State University. 1957: M S.. University of Min- 
nesota. 1959. Ph.D.. 1965 

Foster, Phillips W., Professor of Agricultural and Resource 

Economics 

B S , Cornell University, 1953; M.S., University of Illinois. 1956: 

Ph.D . 1958 

Foumey, William L., Professor of Mechanical Engineenng 
B S A E . West Virginia University. 1962: M.S.. 1963: Ph.D.. Uni- 
versity of Illinois. 1966 

Foust, Clifford M., Professor of History 

B A , Syracuse University, 1949: M.A., University of Chicago. 

1951. PhD. 1957 

Frank, Susan, Assistant Professor. Psychology 

B A . New Yori( University. 1971; Ph D . Yale University. 1976 

Frederiksen, EIke P., Assistant Professor. Gennanic and Slavic 

Languages 

MA. University of Kiel (Gemnany). 1962: MA.. University of 

Wisconsin. 1965: Ph.D . University of Colorado. 1973 

Freedman, Morris, Professor of English 
B A.. City University of New Yorii. 1941 : MA,. Columbia Univer- 
sity. 1950: Ph.D . 1953 

Freeman, David H., Professor of Chemistry 

B S.. University of Rochester. 1952: M.S . Camegie Institute of 

TechriokDgy. 1954. Ph.D . Massachusetts Institute of Technotogy. 

1957 

Freeman, Robert, Associate Professor of Psychology and 
Counseling and Personnel Services 

B A . Haverford College, 1951 .MA. Wesleyan University. 1954. 
Ph D . University of Marylarid. 1964 

Freimuth, Vicki 8., Assistant Professor of Speech and Dramatic 

Art 

B.S.. Eastern Illinois University. 1966. MA. University of Iowa. 

1967. Ph D . Flonda Stale University. 1974 

Fretz. Bruce R., Professor of Psychology 

BA . Gettysburg College 1961 . MA . Ohio State University. 

1963. PhD . 1965. 

Friedman, Hert>ert, Professor of Physics 
B.A.. Brooklyn College. 1936; Ph.D.. The Johns Hopkins Univer- 
sity. 1940 
Fringer, Margaret Neal, Assistant Professor of Physical Educa- 

tlOri 

B.S.. Uriiversity of North Carolina. 1957. M A . University of 
Michigan. 1961 : Ph.D., University of Maryland. 1972. 

Fritz, Sigmund, Visiting Professor of Meteorology 
B S . Brooklyn College. 1934. MS . Massachusetts Institute of 
Tectinology. 1941. ScD. 1953. 

Fromovitz, Stan, Associate Professor of Business and Manage- 
ment 

B, A.Sc . University of Toronto. 1 960: MA. 1 961 . Ph D . Stanford 
University. 1965 

Fry, Gladys M., Associate Professor of English 
B.A.. Howard University. 1952: M.A.. 1954. Ph.D.. Indiana Uni- 
versity. 1967 

Fuegi, John 8., Professor and Director Comparative Literature 
Program 

B.A.. Pomona College. 1961:Ph.D.. University of Southern Cali- 
fornia. 1967 



Funaro, George J., Provost Division of Human and Community 
Resources and Associate Professor of Secondary Educatkjn 
B A . American International College. 1956. M A , Untversity of 
Connecticut. 1961. Ph D . 1965 

Gatlman, Phillip G., Assistant Professor of Electncal Engineer- 



Galloway. Raymond A,, Professor of Botany 

B A , University of Maryland, 1952, MS, 1956, Ph D , 1958 

Gammon, Robert W„ Assistant Professor of Institute of Physical 
Science arid Techriology 

B A , Johns Hopkins University, 1961 : M S , California Institute 
of Technology. 1963. Ph.D . Johns Hopkins University. 1967 

Gannon, John D., Assistant Professor of Computer Science 
B A . Brown University. 1970; M S . 1972: University of Toronto. 
1975 

Gannon, Martin J., Professor of Business and Management 

BA . University of Scranton, 1961; Ph.D.. Columbia University, 
1969 

Gantt, Walter N., Associate Professor of Eariy Childhood-Ele- 
mentary Education 

B S . Coppin Slate College. 1942. MA,. New Yorti University, 
1949. Ed D . University of Maryland, 1968. 

Garbanati, Dennis, Assistant Professor of Mathematks 

BA . Spring Hill College. 1967; MA.. Universily of Califomia. 

Santa Barbara. 1969. Ph D . 1972 

Gart)er, Daniel L., Associate Professor of Civil Engineenng 
B S . University of Maryland. 1952: M S,. 1959; Ph.D.. 1965 

Gardner, Albert H„ Associate Professor. Institute for Child 
Study 

B S . Stale University of New Yorti. Cortland. 1958: M A.. Syra- 
cuse University. 1964. Ph D . 1967 

Gardner, Marjorie H., Professor of Secondary Education and 

Chemistry 

B S . Utah State University. 1946. MA. Ohio State University, 

1958: Ph D. 1960 

Gardner, Michael R., Assistant Professor of Philosophy 
B A . Reed College. 1966: Ph D . Han/ard University. 1971 

Garst, Ronald D., Assistant Professor of Geography 

B.S , Anzona State University, Tempo, 1963: MA, 1966: Ph D., 

Michigan State University, East Lansing, 1972 

Garvey, Everlyn F., Associate Professor of Music 

B S , Temple University, 1943: MM, University of Rochester, 

1946 

Gasner, Larry L., Assistant Professor of Chemical Engi- 
neeririg 

B.S . University of Minnesota. 1965. MS.. Massachusetts Insti- 
tute of Technology. 1967. Ph D .1971. 

Gass, Saul I., Professor of Business and Management 

B.S . Boston University. 1949. M.A,. 1949; Ph D . University of 

California. 1965. 

Gatz, Margaret J,, Assistant Professor of Psychology 

B A , Southwestern at Memphis, 1966; Ph.D., Duke University. 

1972 

Gaylin, Ned L., Professor and Chairman, Department of Family 

and Community Development 

B A , University of Chicago, 1956: M.A., 1961: Ph.D., 1965. 

Gelman, Ellen F., Associate Professor of Art 

AB , Brandeis University. 1961. M FA.. Columbia University. 

1964 

Gelso, Charles J.. Associate Professor of Psychology 
B S . Bloomsburg State College. 1963. M S . Flonda State Uni- 
versity. 1964. Ph D . Ohio Slate University. 1970 
Gemmill, Perry R., Assistant Professor, Industnal Education 
B S , Millersville State College, 1968, MAE.. Ball Stale College, 
1970 

Gentry, James W., Associate Professor of Chemical Engineer- 
ing 

B S . Oklahoma State University. 1961; MS. University of Bir- 
mingham. 1963: Ph D . University of Texas. 1969 

Giblette, John F., Professor. Measurement and Statistics 

B A . George Washington University. 1947. M.A . University of 

Minnesota. 1952. Ph D . University of Pennsylvania. 1960, 

Giffin, Donald W.. Associate Professor of History and Director 

of Admissions and Registrations 

B A . University of California. Santa Barbara. 1950; M.A., Van- 

derbilt University. 1956. Ph D . 1962 

Gilbert. Claire P., Assistant Professor of French and Italian 
B A . Rice University 1960: M A . University of Delaware. 1963; 

Ph b . The Johns Hopkins University. 1969 

Gilbert. James B.. Professor of History 

BA. Carteton College. 1961. M.A. University of Wisconsin. 

1963: PhD. 1966 

Gill, Douglas E.. Assistant Professor of Zoology 

BS , Marietta College, 1965:M.A, University of Michigan, 1967; 

Ph.D, 1971 

Ginter, Marshall L., Professor. Institute lor Physical Science and 

Technology 

B.S.. Chico Slate College. 1958: Ph D . Vanderbilt University, 1961. 



Graduate Faculty / 33 



Girdano, Daniel A.. Associate Professor o1 Health Education 
B A , West Liberty State College. 1964. MA.. Kent State Univer- 
sity. 1965. Ph D . University ol Toledo. 1970 

Girdano, Dorothy D., Associate Professor ol Health Education 
B S.. University of Nebraska. 1960; MA. Colorado Stale Col- 
lege 1964. Ph.D., University of Toledo. 1969 

Glass, James M., Associate Professor of Government and Poii- 



Glasser, Robert G., Professor of Physics 

AB.UniversityofChicago. 1948; B.S.I 950: M.S.. 1952; PhD.. 

1954 

Glendening. Parris N.. Associate Professor of Government and 

Politics 

B.A . Flonda State University. 1964. MA . 1965. Ph D.. 1967. 

Glick, Arnold J., Associate Professor of Physics 

B.A.. Brooldyn College. 1955. Ph.D.. University of Maryland, 

1959 

Gllgor, Virgil D., Assistant Professor. Computer Science 

B.S. University of California (Berkeley). 1972, M.S.. 1973; Ph.D., 

1976. 

Gloeckler, George, Associate Professor of Physics 

BS.. University of Chicago. 1960. M.S. 1961. PhD.. 1965 

Gtover, Rolfe E., Professor of Physics 

A.B . Bowdom College. 1948. BS . Massachusetts Institute of 

Technology. 1948; Ph D . University of Goettingen. 1953 

Gluckstem, Rot>ert L., Chancellor and Professor of Physics and 

Astronomy 

BEE. City College of Nev» York. 1944; Ph.D.. Massachusetts 

Institute ol Technology. 1948 

Goering, Jacob D., Professor. Institute for Child Study 

B A. Bethel College. 1941. PhD. University of Maryland. 1959 

Goldberg, Seymour, Professor of Mathematics 

AB. Hunter College. 1950. M A. Ohio State University. 1952. 

PhD , University of California at Los Angeles, 1958 

Golden, Bruce L., Assistant Professor of Business and Manage- 
ment 

B A . University of Pennsylvania. 1972; S M . Massachusetts 
Institute of Technology. 1974. Ph.D.. 1976 

Goldenbaum, George C Associate Professor of Physics 

BS . Muhlenberg College. 1957; Ph D . University of Maryland. 

1966 

Goldhaber, Jacob K., Professor and Chairman of Mathematics 

B.A . Brooklyn College. 1944. M.A.. Han/ard University. 1945, 

Ph D . University ol Wisconsin. 1950 

Goldman, David T., Professor of Chemical Engineenng 

B.A.. Brooklyn College. 1952. MS . Vanderbilt University, 1954; 

Ph.D.. University of Maryland. 1958. 

Goldman, Harvey, Associate Professor of Administration. Su- 
pervision and Curnculum 

B.A . University of Rhode Island. 1960; MA.. John Carroll Uni- 
versity. 1962. Ed.D.. Michigan State University. 1966 

Goldsby, Richard Allen, Professor of Chemistry 
B A . University of Kansas. 1957; Ph.D., University of California. 
1961 

Goldstein Irwin L., Professor of Psychology 
B A . City College ol Nev» York, 1959, MA. University ol Mary- 
land. 1962; PhD , 1964 

Goldstein, Larry L., Professor of Mathematics 

B.A . University of Pennsylvania. 1965; MA.. 1965; M.A.. Pnnce- 

ton University. 1967; PhD . 1967 

Gottub, Lewis R,, Professor of Psychology 
A.B., University of Pennsylvania, 1955, Ph D.. Harvard Univer- 
sity. 1958. 

Gomezplata, Albert, Prolessor of Chemical Engineenng 
B Ch E . Brooklyn Polytechnic Institute. 1952; M Che.E.. Rens- 
selaer Polytechnic Institute. 1954. Ph D . 1958 

Good, Richard A., Professor of Mathematics 

A.B. Ashland College. 1939; MA. University of Wisconsin. 

1940. PhD. 1945 

Goode, Melvyn Dennis, Associate Professor of Zoology 

B S . University ol Kansas. 1963; Ph D . Iowa State University. 

1967 

Goodin, Robert Edward, Assistant Professor ol Government 

and Politics 

B.A . Indiana University. 1972; Ph D.. Oxford University. 1974 

Goodwyn. Frank, Professor of Spanish 

B A , College ol Arts and Industries. 1940; MA . 1941. Ph D.. 

University of Texas. 1946 

Gordon, Donald C, Professor of History 
A.B . College ol William and Mary. 1934. MA. Columbia Univer- 
sity. 1937; Ph D . 1947 

Gordon, Glen E., Prolessor of Chemistry 

BS . University of Illinois, 1956; Ph.D., University ol Calilomia. 

Berkeley. 1960 

Gordon, Stewart L., Professor of Music 

B.A . University of Kansas. 1953; MA . 1954. DM A,. University 

of Rochester. 1965 

Gormally, James, Assistant Professor. Psychology 

B.A . Manrt College, 1969; M.A.. Southern Illinois University. 

1972. Ph D . 1974 



Gorovitz, Samuel, Professor and Chairman of the Department 
of Philosophy 

BS . Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 1960; Ph D . Stan- 
ford University. 1963 

Gowdy, Robert H., Assistant Professor of Physics 
B S . Worchester Polytechnic Institute. 1963; MS . Yale Univer- 
sity. 1964. PhD . 1968. 

Gramberg, Edvard, Professor of Spanish 
B A.. University of Amsterdam, 1946; MA.. University of Cali- 
fornia. Los Angeles, 1949; Ph.D . University of California. Berke- 
ley. 1956. 

Grambs, Jean D., Professor of Secondary Education 

AB. Reed College, 1940; MA.. Stanford University. 1941; 

EdD . 1948 

Grant, Lee P., Assistant Professor. Agncultural Engineenng 
B S . University of Connecticut. 1962, M.S., Pennsylvania State 
University, 1971. Ph D . 1974. 

Gray, Alfred, Professor ol Mathematics 

B.A .University of Kansas. 1960. MA. 1961 Ph.D. University of 

California. Los Angeles. 1964 

Green, Eleanor B., Assistant Prolessor of Art 
A.B . Vassar College. 1949; M.A., George Washington Univer- 
sity. 1971; PhD . 1973 

Green, Harry B., Jr., Assistant Professor. Institute for Child 

Study 

B.A . University of Virginia. 1959. M.Ed.. 1963; Ph.D.. 1965 

Green, Paul S., Associate Professor of Mathematics 

B.A . Cornell University. 1959; MA. Harvard University. 1960; 

Ph D . Cornell University. 1964 

Green, Robert L., Professor. Agncultural Engineenng 

B S A E . University of Georgia. 1934; MS . lov»a State College. 

1939. Ph D.. Michigan State University. 1953 

Green, Willard W,, Professor of Animal Science 

B S . University of Minnesota, 1933, MS . 1934. Ph.D.. 1939 

Greenberg, Kenneth R., Associate Professor of Counseling and 
Personnel Services 

B S . Ohio State University. 1951; M.A.. 1952. Ph D., Western 
Reserve University. 1960 

Greenberg, Leon, Professor of Mathematics 

B S . City College of New York, 1953; M.A.. Yale University. 

1955; PhD . 1958 

Greentjerg, Louis M., Associate Professor of History 

B A . Brooklyn College, 1954; MA., Harvard University. 1957; 

Ph D . 1963 

Greent>erg, Oscar W., Professor of Physics 

BS . Rutgers University, 1952; M.S.. Pnnceton University. 1954. 

Ph D.. 1956 

Greene, James B.. Assistant Professor of Business and Man- 
agement 
B A., Duke University. 1969; PhD . University of Michigan. 1975 

Greenwood, David C, Associate Professor of English 
B A . University of London. 1949. Certificate in Education. Not- 
tingham. 1953. Ph.D.. University ol Dublin. 1968 

Greer, Thomas V., Professor of Business and Management 
B A . University ol Texas. 1953 M B A . Ohio State University. 
1957. Ph D . University of Texas, 1964 

Greisman, Harvey C, Assistant Professor of Sociology 
B A . State University of New Yorti. NewPaltz. 1966;M.A. Syra- 
cuse University. 1969; Ph D . 1972 

Griem, Hans, Professor of Physics 

Arbiture. Max Planck Schule. 1949; PhD. University of Kiel. 

1954. 

Griffin, James J., Professor of Physics 

B S.. Villanova College. 1952; M.S., Pnnceton University, 1955. 

PhD . 1956 

Grim, Samuel 0., Professor of Chemistry 

BS . Franklin and Marshall College, 1956; Ph.D., Massachusetts 

Institute ol Technology. 1960 

Grimsted, David A., Associate Professor of History 

A B . Harvard University. 1957. M A.. University of Calilomia, 

Berkeley. 1958. PhD. 1963 

Grollman, Sfgmund, Professor of Zoology 

BS, University ol Maryland. 1947; MS. 1949; PhD. 1952 

Groves, Paul A,, Associate Prolessor of Geography 

B Sc . University of London. 1956. MA. University of Maryland. 

1961 ; Ph D . University ol California. Berkeley. 1969 

Gruchy, Allan G., Professor ol Economics 
B A . University of Bnlish Columbia. 1926. MA.. McGill Univer- 
sity. 1929. PhD . University of Virginia. 1931 

Grunig, James E., Associate Professor of Journalism 

B S . Iowa State University. 1964. MS . University of Wisconsin. 

1966; PhD. 1968 

Guernsey, Ralph L., Research Associate Professor. Institute lor 
Fluid Dynamics and Applied Mathematics 
B A . Miami University. 1952; MS . 1954. Ph D . University ol 
Michigan. 1970 

Gulllory, John U., Assistant Professor of Physics 

BA.. Rice University, 1962, Ph.D., University of California. 

Berkeley. 1970. 



Gulick, Sidney L., Professor of Mathematics 

B.A.. Oberlin College. 1958; MA. Yale University 1960. Ph.D., 

1963 

Gump, Lamey R., Assistant Prolessor of Counseling and Per- 
sonnel Services 

BS , West Virginia University. 1959; M.Ed.. Temple University, 
1961. D Ed . Pennsylvania State University, 1967. 

Haber, Francis C, Prolessor of History 

B A . University ol Connecticut. 1948; MA.. The Johns Hopkins 

University. 1952. Ph D.. 1957 

Hacklander, Effie, Assistant Professor of Textiles and Con- 
sumer Economics 

BS . University of Minnesota. 1962; M.A.. Michigan State Uni- 
versity. 1968 Ph D . 1973. 

Hagerty, Patrick E., Assistant Professor of Computer Science 
B.A., Syracuse University. 1960; BE.E., 1961; M.S., 1967; Ph.D., 
1969 

Haley, A.J., Professor of Zoology 

B S . University of New Hampshire. 1949; M.S.. 1950; Sc.D . The 

Johns Hopkins University. 1955 

Hall, Jerome W,, Associate Professor of Civil Engineenng 
B S . Han,ey Mudd College. 1965; MS . University of Washing- 
ton. 1968. PhD . 1969 

Hamilton, Donna B., Assistant Professor of English 

B.A.. SI Olaf College. 1963; Ph.D.. University of Wisconsin, 

Madison. 1968 

Hamilton, Gary O., Associate Professor of English 

B.A.. SI. Dial College. 1962; M.A.. University of Wisconsin, 

1965; PhD . 1968 

Hamlet, Richard Graham, Assistant Professor of Computer Sci- 
ence 

BS , University of Wisconsin. 1959; M.S., Cornell University, 
1964; Ph.D., University of Washington, 1971. 

Hamlet, Sandra L., Associate Professor of Heahng and Speech 
Sciences. B.A . University of Wisconsin. 1959; M.A.. University 
of Washington. 1967. PhD . 1970 

Hammer, David A., Associate Professor of Physics 

B S . California Institute of Technology. 1964; Ph.D., Comell 

University. 1969 

Hammond, Rot)ert C, Professor and Chairman of Vetehnary 

Science 

B S.. Pennsylvania Slate University, 1943.D.V.M.. University of 

Pennsylvania. 1948 

Hahnemann, Robert J., Assistant Professor, Mechanical Engi- 
neenng 

B S , Illinois Institute ol Technology. 1970; M.S.. New YorV Uni- 
versity. 1972; Sc D.. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 
1975. 

Hansen, J.N., Associate Professor of Chemistry 

B.A.. Drake University. 1964; Ph D University ol California. Los 

Angeles. 1968 

Harber, Jean R., Assistant Professor of Special Education 
B A , State University of New York. 1969, M Ed.. Temple Uni- 
versity. 1971; Ed.D,, 1975. 

Hardgrave, Walter Terry, Assistant Professor. Information Sys- 
tems Management 
B S.. University ol Texas, 1967; MA . 1970; Ph.D.. 1972 

Hardie, Ian W., Associate Professor of Agncultural and Re- 
source Economics 

B.S.. University of California. Davis. 1960; Ph D . University ol 
California. Berkeley 1965. 

Hardin, Russell, Associate Professor, Government and Politics 
B.A and BS. University of Texas. 1963. B.A. Oxford University; 
Ph D . Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 1971 

Hardwick, Mark W„ Assistant Professor of Counseling and Per- 
sonnel Services 
B A.. Michigan Slate University, 1966; M.A., 1967; Ph.D., 1970. 

Hardy, Robert C, Associate Professor. Institute For Child Study 
B S Ed . Bucknell University. 1961. MS. Ed.. Indiana University, 
1964, EdD. 1969 

Harger, Robert O., Professor and Chairman of Electhcal Engi- 
neenng 
BSE . University ol Michigan. 1955,M.S.E., 1959; Ph.D., 1961. 

Harlan, Louis R., Prolessor of History 

B.A,. Emory University. 1943; M A . Vanderbilt University. 1947: 

Ph D . The Johns Hopkins University. 1955 

Harper, Glenn A., Assistant Professor of Sociology 
BS.. Purdue University. 1958. MS.. 1961. Ph.D. 1968. 

Harper, Robert A., Professor and Chairman of Geography 
PhB. University ol Chicago, 1946. BS. 1947; M.S.. 1948: 
PhD . 1950 

Harrington, J. Patrick, Associate Prolessor of Astronomy 
B S . University of Chicago. 1961. M.S., Ohio State University, 
1964. PhD . 1967 

Harris, Curtis C, Prolessor of Economics 

BS . University of Florida. 1956. (vl. A. Harvard University, 1959: 

PhD. 1960 

Harris, James F., Assistant Prolessor of History 

B S . Loyola University. 1962; M.S., University of Wisconsin, 

1964. PhD. 1968. 



34 / Graduate Faculty 



Harris, Wesley L., Professor o( Agricultural Engineering 
B.S.A.E., University ol Georgia, 1953. M.S.. 1958; Ph.D., Michi- 
gan State University, 1960 

Harrison, Floyd P., Professor of Entomology 
BS . Louisiana Stale University. 1951; M.S.. 1953. Ph.D . Uni- 
versity of Maryland, 1955 

Harrison, Horace V., Professor of Government and Politics 
B.A . Tnnity University. 1932; M.A., University of Texas 1941 
Ph.D., 1951 

Harrison, Paul E., Jr., Professor of Industrial Education 
B.Ed. Northern Illinois StateCollege. 1942; MA. Colorado State 
College. 1947; Ph.D.. University of Maryland. 1955. 

Hasenauer, Edward J., Assistant Professor. Speech and Dra- 
matic Art 

B.A.. lona College. 1971 

Haslem. John A., Professor and Associate Dean of the College 
of Business and Management 

A.B.. Duke University. 1956; M.B.A.. University of North Caro- 
lina. 1961; Ph.D.. 1967 

Hatch, Randloph Thomas, Assistant Professor of Chemical 
Engineering 

BS . University of California. Berlieley. 1967; MS . Massachu- 
setts Institute of Technology. 1969; Ph.D. 1973 

Hatfield, Agnes B., Associate Professor. Institute tor Child 

Study 

B.A., University of California. 1948 M A . University of Denver. 

1954; PhD . 1959 

Hathorn, Guy B., Professor of Government and Politics 

A.B . University of Mississippi. 1940. MA. 1942; PhD . Duke 

University. 1950 

Hauptman, William, Assistant Professor of An 

B.A.. Tfie George Washington University. 1968; M.A.. 1970; Ph D.. 

The Pennsylvania State University. 1975. 

Hayleck, Charles R., Jr., Associate Professor of Mechanical 

Engineering 

BS . University of Maryland. 1943; M S . 1949 

Hayward. Raymond W., Professor of Physics 

8 S.. Iowa State College. 1943; Ph.D.. University of Calfornia. 

Berkeley. 1950 

Head, Emerson, Associate Professor of Music 
B Mus.. University of Michigan. 1957, M Mus , 1961 

Heath, James L., Associate Professor of Poultry Science 
BS , Louisiana State University, 1963, MS , 1968, PhD. 1970 

Hetwler, Jean R., Professor of Special Education 

B.S.. Buffalo State Teachers College. 1953. MS . University of 

Illinois. 1956; Ed.D . Syracuse University. 1960 

Hecht, Matthew S., Assistant Professor of Computer Science 
8 S E , Case Western Resen/e University. 1970; M S.E. Pnnce- 
ton University. 1971; MA. 1973; PhD. 1973 
Heidclbach, Ruth, Associate Professor of Early Childhood Ele- 
mentary Education and Associate Director, Office of Laboratory 
Experiences 

B S . University of Maryland. 1949; M Ed . University of Florida. 
1958; Ed.D.. Columbia University. 1967 

Heikltinen, Henry Wendell, Assistant Professor of Chemistry 
and Secondary Education 

B Eng . Yale University. 1956, M.A., Columbia University, 1962, 
Ph D., University of Maryland, 1973 

Helm, Norman, Professor of Music 

B M.Ed., Evansville College, 1951. M.M., University of Roches- 
ter, 1952, DMA, 1962 

Helns, Conrad P., Jr., Professor. Civil Engineenng 
B S . Drexel Institute of Technology. 1960. MS . Lehigh Univer- 
sity. 1962; Ph D . University of Maryland. 1967 

Helsler, Martin O., Associate Professor of Government and Pol- 



Hellman, John L., Assistant Professor. Entomology 
B S . University of Maryland. 1966, M S . 1968 

Helm, E. Eugene, Professor of Music 

B M E.. Southeastern Louisiana College. 1960. M M.E.. Louis- 
iana State University. 1955; Ph D , North Texas State University, 
1958 

Helz, George P., Associate Professor of Chemistry 
A B . Pnncelon University. 1964; Ph D , Pennsylvania State Uni- 
versity, 1971 

Helzer, G.A., Associate Professor of Mathematics 
B A . Portland State College. 1959. MA . NorthvKestern Univer- 
sity. 1962. PhD., 1964 

Hempstead, R. Ross, Assistant Professor of Education. Educa- 
tion Technology Center 

A B.. University of California. Berkeley. 1962. M A . 1966; Ph D . 
1968 

Henery-Logan, Kenneth R., Professor of Chemistry 
B.Sc . McGill University. 1942; Ph D , 1946 

Henkel, Ramon E.. Associate Professor of Sociology 

Ph.B . University of Wisconsin. 1958. MA.. 1961; Ph.D.. 1967 

Henkelman, James, Associate Professor of Secondary Educa- 
tion and Mathematics 

B S . Miami University. 1954. M Ed . 1955; Ed D . Harvard Uni- 
versity. 1965 



Herlng, Chrlstoph A., Professor and Chairman of Germanic and 

Slavic Languages 

PhD . Rhein-Friedrich-Wilhelms Universitat. 1950 

Herman, Harold J., Associate Professor. English 
B.A.. University of Maryland, 1952, Ph D,, University of Penn- 
sylvania, 1960 

Herman, Wayne L., Associate Professor of Early Childhood and 
Elementary Education 

B A.. Ursinus College. 1955. M.Ed.. Temple Universitv. 1960; 
Ed.D.. 1965. 

Herschbach, Dennis R., Associate Professor of Industnal Edu- 
cation 

A.B.. San Jose Stale College. 1960; M.S.. University of Illinois. 
1968; Ph.D.. 1972 

Hesse, Michael Bernard, Assistant Professor of Journalism 
A B . University of Cincinnati. 1965; M A , American University. 
1967. PhD . University of Wisconsin, 1974 

Hetrick Frank M., Professor of Microbiology 
B.S.. Michigan State University. 1954; M.S.. University of Mary- 
land. 1960; PhD. 1962 

Hicks, Eric C, Assistant Professor of French and Italian 
B A.. Yale University. 1959. PhD . 1965. 

Hiet)ert, Ray Eldon, Professor and Dean of the College of Jour- 
nalism 

BA,. Stanford University. 1954. M.S. Columbia University. 
1967;M A , University of Maryland. 1961. Ph.D. 1962 

Higgins, William J., Assistant Professor of Zoology 

BS . Boston College. 1969; Ph.D.. Florida State University. 

1973 

Highton, Richard, Professor of Zoology 

A.B . New York University, 1950; M.S . University of Florida, 

1953, Ph.D., 1956. 

Hill, Clara E., Assistant Professor of Psychology 

B.A . Southern Illinois University. 1970; MA.. 1972; Ph D . 1974 

Hill, David G., Assistant Professor of Physics 

B S. Carnegie-Mellon University. 1959. MS . 1960. PhD.. 1964 

Hilt, Kathy Jean, Assistant Professor of Elementary Education 
B.A.. State University of New York. 1964. M.Ed., 1970; Ed.D,, 
1975, 



Hirzel, Rot)ert K., Associate Professor of Sociology 

BA. Pennsylvania Slate University. 1946; M.A.. 1950. Ph.D. 

Louisiana State University. 1954 

Hochull, Urs E., Professor of Electrical Engineering 

BS . Technikum Biel. Switzerland. 1952; MS,. University of 

Maryland. 1955; PhD . Catholic University of America. 1962. 

Hodos, William Professor of Psychology 

8 S . Brooklyn College. 1955. M A . University of Pennsylvania. 

1957; Ph D . 1960 

Hoffman, Ronald, Associate Professor of History 

B A . George Peabody College. 1964. M A . University of Wis- 

1965; Ph.D., 1969 

Holdaway, P.K., Assistant Professor, Dairy Science 

B.S.. Brigham Young University. 1966; M.S., 1969; Ph.D.. Ohio 

Slate University. 1973 

Holloway, David C, Associate Professor of Mechanical Engi- 
neering 
B S., University of Illinois. 1966; MS . 1969; PhD , 1971. 

Holmgren, Harry D., Professor of Physics 

B.Phys. University of Minnesota. 1949; MA.. 1950; Ph.D.. 1954 

Holmgren, John E., Assistant Professor of Psychology 

B.S.. University of Wisconsin. 1965; Ph D . Stanford University. 

1970 

Holmlund, Chester E., Professor of Chemistry 

BS . Worcester Polytechnic Institute. 1943. M.S.. 1951; Ph.D.. 

University of Wisconsin. 1954 

Holton, William Milne, Associate Professor of English 

A.B.. Dartmouth College. 1954; L.L.B . Han/ard University. 1957; 

MA. Yale University. 1959; Ph.D.. 1965. 

Holum, Kenneth G., Assistant Professor of History 

B A Augstana College, 1961. MA , University of Chicago, 1969; 

Ph.D. 1973 

Hopkins, Richard L., Associate Professor, Social Foundations 
of Education 

8 S. Stanford University. 1962; M.S.. 1963; Ph.D. University of 
California. Los Angeles. 1969. 

Hornbake, R. Lee, Vice President for Academic Affairs and Pro- 
fessor of Industrial Education 

B.S.. Pennsylvania State Teachers College. 1934; M.A.. Ohio 
State University. 1936. Ph.D.. 1942; L.L.D.. Eastern Michigan 
University. 1963 

Hornung, Carlton, Assistant Professor of Sociology 
B.A.. State University of New York at Buffalo. 1967. M.A.. Syra- 
cuse University. 1970; Ph D . 1972. 

Hornyak, William F., Professor of Physics 

BEE.. City University of New York. City College. 1944. M.S.. 

California Institute of Technology. 1946. Ph D . 1949 

Horton, David L., Professor of Psychology 

B.A.. University of Minnesota. 1955; M.A.. 1957; Ph D . 1959. 



Horvath, John M., Professor of Mathematics 
Ph.D.. University of Budapest. 1947 

Houppert, Joseph W., Associate Professor of English 

Ph B . University of Detroit. 1955; M.A.. University of Michigan 

1957; Ph D . 1964 

Hovey. Richard B., Professor of English 

A.B , University of Cincinnati, 1942; MA, Han/ard University, 

1943. PhD. 1950 

Howard, John 0., Associate Professor of English 

B A.. Washington College. 1956; M.A.. University of Maryland 

1962; PhD.. 1967 

Howard, Lawrence V., Jr., Assistant Professor of Microbiology 
B.A . Emory University. 1963. M.S.. University of North Carolina 
at Chapel Hill. 1966; PhD . 1970 

Hoyt, Kenneth B., Professor of Counseling and Personnel Ser- 
vices 

B S . University of Maryland. 1948; MA. George Washington 
University. 1950; Ph.D.. University of Minnesota. 1954 

Hsu, Shao T., Professor of Mechanical Engineering 
B S-. Chiao-Tung University. 1937; MS . Massachusetts Institute 
of Technology. 1944; Sc.D . Swiss Federal Institute of Tech- 
nology, 1954. 

Hsueh, Chun-tu, Professor of Government and Politics 
L.L.B . Chaoyang University Law School. 1946; M.A.. Columbia 
University. 1953; PhD . 1958, 

Hubbard, Bert E., Research Professor. Institute for Physical Sci- 
ence and Technology, and Mathematics 
BS . Western Illinois University. 1949; MS.. State University of 
Iowa. 1952; PhD . University of Maryland. 1960 

Hubbe, Rolf O., Associate Professor of Classical Languages 
and Literature 

A B.. Hamilton College. 1947; AM. Princeton University. 1950; 
PhD . 1950. 

Huden, Daniel P., Associate Professor. Social Foundations of 
Education 

8.S-. University of Vermont. 1954; M.A.. Columbia Teachers 
College. 1958. Ed D . 1967 
Hudson, William Professor of Music 

B.Mus.. Philadelphia Conservatory of Music. 1954; B.A.. Univer- 
sity of Pennsylvania. 1957; M. Mus,. Yale School of Music. 1961. 

Huebner, Rotwrt W., Associate Professor. Institute for Child 
Study 

BS, Concordia Teachers College. 1957; MA. 1960; Ph.D.. Uni- 
versity of Maryland. 1969 

Huheey, James E., Professor of Chemistry 
B.S.. University of Cincinnati. 1957; M.S.. 1959; Ph D . Univer- 
sity of Illinois. 1961 

Hult, Joan S., Assistant Professor of Physical Education 
BS . Indiana University. 1954; M.Ed.. University of North Caro- 
lina. 1957; Ph.D.. University of Southern Califomia. 1967. 

Hummel, James A., Professor of Mathematics and Statistics 
B.S.. California Institute of Technology. 1949. M.A.. Rice Insti- 
tute. 1953; Ph.D.. 1955 

Humphrey, James H., Professor of Physical Education and 
Chairman. Recreation 

8. A.. Denison University. 1 933; M.A.. Westem Resen/e Universi- 
ty. 1946; Ed D . Boston University. 1951 

Hunt, Edith J., Assistant Professor. Institute for Child Study 
A.B.. University of Redlands. 1954. M.A., Fresno State College. 
1964; Ed.D.. University of Maryland, 1967 

Hunt, Janet GIbbs, Assistant Professor of Sociology 

BA.. University of Redlands. 1962; MA . Indiana University. 

1966; PhD.. 1973 

Hunt, Larry L., Assistant Professor of Sociology 
B.S.. Ball State University. 1961. M.A., Indiana University. 1964. 
Ph.D.. 1968. 

Hurdis, David A., Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineer- 
ing 

BS. University of Rhode Island. 1962; M.S.. 1964, Ph.D.. Catho- 
lic University. 1973. 

Husman, Burrls F., Professor and Chairman of Physical Educa- 
tion 

B.S.. University of Illinois. 1941; MS.. 1948. Ed.D. University of 
Maryland. 1954 

Hynes, Cecil v.. Associate Professor of Business and Manage- 
ment 
B.A., Michigan State University. 1948; MA.. 1949; Ph.D.. 1965. 

Imtierski, Richard 8., Associate Professor of Zoology 
B.S.. University of Rochester. 1959; Ph D . 1965 

Ingling, Allen L., Assistant Professor. Vetennary Science 
B.S.E.E.. University of Maryland. 1963; V.M.D . University of 
Pennsylvania. 1969 

Ingraham, Barton L., Associate Professor of Cnminal Justice 
and Criminology 

A.B.. Harvard University. 1952; L LB . Harvard Law School. 1957; 
M-Cnm.. University of California. Berkeley. 1968;D.Cnm.. 1972. 

Ingram, Anne G., Professor of Physical Education 

A. 8.. University of North Carolina 1944. MA. University of 

Georgia. 1948; Ed.D . Columbia University. 1962. 

Inouye, David W., Assistant Professor. Zoology 
B.A.. Swarthmore College. 1971 ; Ph.D.. University of North Caro- 
lina. 1976. 



Graduate Faculty / 35 



Irwin, George R., Professor of Mechanical Engineering 

A,B . Knox College. 1930: MS. University of Illinois. 1933. 

Ph.D., 1937. 

Isaacs, Nell D., Protessor of English 

A B . Dartmouth College. 1953; A.M.. University of Calilomia. 
Berkeley. 1956; Ph D . Brown University, 1959. 
Ishee, Sidney, Professor of Agricultural and Resource Eco- 
nomics 

B.S.. Mississippi Stale College. 1950; M.S.. Pennsylvania State 
University. 1952; Ph D., 1957 

Israel, Gerhard W., Associate Professor of Meteorology 
B.S.. University of Heidelt)er9. 1962. Ph.D., Technologische 
Hochschule. Aachen. 1965 

Jachowski, Leo A., Jr., Professor of Zoology 

B.S. University of Michigan. 1941;M S . 1942. ScD .The Johns 

Hopkins University. 1953 

Jackson, Stanley B., Professor of Mathematics 

A.B-. Bates College. 1933; A.M.. Hanrard University. 1934; Ph D . 

1937. 

Jacobs, Walter D., Professor of Government and Politics 

B.S.. Columbia University, 1955; M.A.. 1956, Ph.D., 1961 

Jacobson, Elliott R,, Assistant Professor of Veterinary Science 
B.A.. City University of New York (Brooklyn). 1967; MS . New 
Mexico State University. 1969; Ph D , University of Missouri. 
1975; DV.M.. 1975 

James, Edward F„ Assistant Professor of English and Secon- 
dary Education 

B.A., University of Maryland. 1954; M.A.. 1955, Ph.D., Catholic 
University of America. 1969 

James, M. Lucia, Professor. Administration. Supervision and 

Curriculum 

A.B., North Carolina College, 1945; MS . University of Illinois. 

1949; Ph.D., University of Connecticut. 1963. 

Jamieson, Kathleen, Associate Professor of Speech and Dra- 
matic Art 

B.A.. Marquette University, 1967; M.A., University of Wisconsin, 
1968; PhD. 1972 

Janes, Robert W„ Prolessor of Sociology 
A.B., University of Chicago, 1938. M.A.. 1939; Ph.D.. University 
of Illinois. 1942. 

Jantz, Richard K,, Associate Professor of Early Childhood Ele- 
mentary Education 

B.S.. Indiana University at Fort Wayne, 1968; M.S.. 1970; Ed. D., 
Ball State University. 1972 

Jaquith, Richard H,, Professor of Chemistry and Assistant Vice- 
Chancellor for Academic Affairs 

B.S.. University of Massachusetts. 1940. M.S.. 1942; Ph D . 
Michigan State University. 1955 

Jarvis, Bruce 8., Associate Professor of Chemistry 
B.A., Ohio Wesleyan University, 1963; Ph D., University of Colo- 
rado. 1966 

Jashemski, Wilhelmlna F,, Professor of History 

A.B.. York College. 1931; A.M.. University of Nebraska. 1933; 

PhD . University of Chicago. 1942 

Jellema, Roderick H,, Associate Professor of English 

B.A., Calvin College. 1951.Ph D . University of Edinburgh. 1962 

Johns, Elizabeth B,, Assistant Professor of Art 

B.A . Birmingham-Southern College. 1959. MA. University of 

California. Berkeley. 1965; PhD . Emory University. 1974 

Johnson, Arthur T., Assistant Professor, Agricultural Engineer- 
ing 
B S A E.. Cornell University. 1964; M.S., 1967; Ph.D.. 1969 

Johnson, Bruce H,, Assistant Professor, Institute of Criminal 
Justice and Criminology 

A.B.. Whealon College. 1959; B D . Tilles Theological Seminary. 
1962. IVI A,. University of Illinois. 1968. Ph D.. 1973 

Johnson, Charles E., Associate Protessor of Education 
B.A.. University of Minnesota. 1957. Ph D . 1964 

Johnson, Conrad D,, Associate Professor of Philosophy 
A.B.. Stanford University. 1965. A.M.. University of Michigan. 
1966. PhD . 1969 

Johnson, Everett R,, Associate Dean and Professor of Chemi 
cal Engineering 

B A , State University of Iowa. 1937; M.A.. Harvard University 
1940; PhD . University of Rochester. 1949 

Johnson, Jerry Wayne, Assistant Professor of Agronomy 
AS. Abraham Baldwin Agricultural College. 1968. B.S.. Univer 
sity of Georgia. 1970; MS . Purdue University. 1972; PhD 
1974 

Johnson, Knowlton, W., Assistant Professor of Cnminiat Justice 
and Criminology 

B.S . Clemson University, 1 964; M.A., Michigan State University. 
1969. PhD . 1971 

Johnson, Martin L., Associate Professor of Early Childhood- 
Elementary Education 

A, A.. Friendship Junior College, i960. B S.. Morns College. 
1962. M Ed . University of Georgia. 1968; Ed.D . 1971 

Johnson, Raymond L,, Associate Professor of Mathematics 
B A . University of Texas. 1963. Ph D . Rice University. 1969 

Johnson, Ronald C, Assistant Professor of Physical Education 
B S Baylor University, 1957; M S . 1958; Ed D . 1970 

36 / Graduate Faculty 



Johnson, Warren R,, Professor of Health Education 
B A . University of Denver, 1942; M. A.. 1946; Ed.D . Boston Uni- 
versity. 1950 

Jolson, M.A., Assistant Professor of Business and Management 
B.E E . George Washington University. 1949. MBA. University 
of Chicago. 1965. D B A.. University of Maryland. 1969 

Jones, Everett, Associate Professor of Aerospace Engineenng 
BAE , Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. 1965; MAE. 1960 
Ph D . Stanford University. 1968 

Jones, George P., Professor of Germanic and Slavic Lan- 



A.B . Emory University. 1938; M.A.. Oxford University. 1943; 
PhD . Columbia University. 1951. 

Jones, G, Stephen, Research Professor, Institute for Physical 
Science and Technology 

A B , Duke University. 1952; Navy Certificate. Naval Post-gradu- 
ate School. 1955; MS . Uhiversity of North Carolina. 1958. 
PhD . University ol Cincinnati. 1960 

Jones, Jack C, Professor of Entomology 

BS . Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 1939; MS.. 1947; PhD . 

Iowa State University. 1950 

Kacser, Claude, Associate Professor of Physics 

B.A . Oxford University. 1955. M.A.. 1959; PhD , 1959. 

Kahn, Wallace J., Assistant Professor of Counseling and Per- 
sonnel Services 

B.S .Bloomsburg State College. 1966; M.Ed . University of Mary- 
land. 1971. AGS. 1972; PhD. 1974 
Kammeyer, Kenneth C.W., Professor and Chairman of Sociolo- 
gy 

B A.. University of Northern Iowa. 1953; M A.. State University of 
Iowa, 1958, Ph.D.. 1960. 

Kanal, Laveen N,, Professor of Computer Science 

B SEE.. University of Washington. 1951; M.S.E.E.. 1953; Ph.D.. 

University of Pennsylvania. 1960 

Kantzes, James G., Professor of Botany 

BS. University of Maryland. 1951;MS. 1954; PhD. 1957 

Karlander, Edward P„ Associate Professor of Botany 

B S-. University ol Vermont. 1960 M.S.. University of Maryland. 

1962. PhD.. 1964. 

Karlovitz, Les, A., Research Professor. Institute for Physical 

Science and Technology, and Mathematics 

B S . Yale University, 1959. PhD . Carnegie Mellon University. 

1964 

Kasler, Franz J,, Associate Professor of Chemistry 
Ph.D.. University of Vienna. 1959 

Kaufman, Stuart B,, Associate Professor of History 
B A.. University of Florida. 1962. MA . 1964, Ph.D., Emory Uni- 
versity. 1970 

Kedem, Benjamin, Assistant Professor of Mathematics 
B S., Roosevelt University. 1968; MS. Camegie-Mellon Univer- 
sity. 1970; PhD . 1972. 

Keeney, Mark, Chairman. Nutritional Sciences and Professor of 
Chemistry and Dairy Science 

B.S.. Pennsylvania State University. 1942. MS . Ohio State Uni- 
versity. 1947; Ph-D . Pennsylvania State University. 1950 

Kelejian, Harry H,, Professor of Economics 

B A. Hofstra College. 1962,M.A., University of Wisconsin. 1965; 

Ph.D., 1968. 

Keltey, David L., Professor of Physical Education 
A B.. San Diego State College. 1957; M.S.. University ol South- 
ern California. 1958; PhD . 1962 

Kellogg, R. Bruce, Research Professor. Institute for Physical 
Science and Technology, and Mathematics 
B S . Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1952; MS . Uni- 
versity of Chicago. 1953. Ph D . 1959. 

Kelsey, Roger R., Associate Protessor of Administration. Su- 
pervision and Curnculum 

B.A.. Saint Olaf College, 1934; MA,. University ol Minnesota. 
1940; Ed.D . George Peabody College for Teachers. 1954 

Kenny, Shirley S., Prolessor and Chairman of English 

B.A . University of Texas. 1955; MA.. University ol Minnesota, 

1957; Ph.D.. University of Chicago, 1964, 

Kent, George O., Professor of History 

BS. Columbia University. 1948; M.A.. 1950; Ph.D., Oxford Uni- 
versity. 1958, 

Kenworthy, William J., Assistant Professor. Agronomy 
B S , Purdue University. 1970; M.S., North Carolina State Uni- 
versity. 1972. 

Kerley, Ellis R,, Professor and Chairman of Anthropology 

B S.. University of Kentucky, 1950; M.S.. University of Michigan. 

1956, Ph.D., 1962 

Kerr, Frank J„ Professor and Director of Astronomy 

B.S.. University of Melbourne. 1938; MS . 1940; M.A., Harvard 

University. 1951. D Sc . University of Melbourne. 1962. 



KIdd, Jerry S., Acting Dean, College of Library and Infomiation 
Services and Professor. College of bbrary and Information Ser- 
vices 

B.S . Illinois Wesleyan University. 1950; M.A.. Northwestern Uni- 
versity. 1954; Ph.D., 1956. 

Kim, Chul, Assistant Professor of Computer Science 
BS. Seoul National University. 1963; M.S.. University of Minne- 
sota. 1971. Ph D . 1975 

Kim, Hogil, Professor of Electrical Engineenng and Physics 
B S . Seoul National University. 1956; Ph.D., University of Birming- 
ham. 1964. 

Kim, Young S., Associate Professor of Physics 

B.S.. Carnegie Institute of Technology. 1958; Ph.D.. Princeton 

University. 1961. 

King, A,, Thomas, Assistant Professor of Economics 

AS-. Stanford University, 1966; M.Phil.. Yale University, 1969; 

Ph.D., 1972. 

King, Henry C, Assistant Professor, Mathematics 

A.B.. Brown University, 1969; Ph.D.. University of California (Betke- 

ley). 1974, 

King, Raymond L., Director. Food Science and Professor of 

Dairy Science 

AS. University of Califomia. Berkeley. 1955. PhD . 1958 

King, William E., Jr,, Assistant Professor, Chemk:al Engineenng 
B.S . University of Pittsburgh, 1965, M.S., Camegie-Mellon Uni- 
versity. 1968. 

Kinnaird, John W,, Associate Professor of English 

B.A-. University of California, Berkeley, 1944; M.A., Columbia 

University. 1949; Ph.D.. 1959 

Kirby, Karen, Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

Sc.B.. Brown University. 1972; M.S., 1972; M.A.. Pnnceton, 

1974; PhD,. 1975, 

Kirk, James A., Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering 
B.S.E.E.. Ohio University. 1967, M.S.M.E.. Massachusetts Insti- 
tute of Technology. 1969; Sc.D., 1972. 

Kirkley, Donald H„ Jr„ Associate Professor of Speech and 
Dramatic Arl 

B.A.. University of Maryland, 1960; M.A., 1962; Ph.D., Ohio Uni- 
versity, 1967. 

Kirwan, William E,. Professor of Mathematics 

A B., University of Kentucky. 1960; M.S., Rutgers University, 

1962; Ph.D.. 1964. 

Klank, Richard E,, Associate professor of Art 
B.A.. Catholic University. 1962; M.F.A . 1964 

Klarman, William L,, Professor of Botany 

B S , Eastern Illinois University, 1957. M.S . University of Illinois, 

1960, Ph. D. 1962. 

Kleine, Don W., Associate Prolessor of English 

B.A . University of Chicago, 1950; MA.. 1953; Ph.D . University 

of Michigan, 1961. 

Kleppner, Adam, Professor of Mathematics 

B S.. Yale University. 1953; M.A., University of Michigan, 1954; 

Ph.D.. Harvard University, 1960. 

Knefelkamp, L. Lee, Assistant Protessor of Counseling and 

Personnel Services 

B.A., Macalester College, 1967; M.A., University of Minnesota, 

1973; Ph.D.. 1974. 

Knifong, James Dan, Assistant Professor of Elementary Educa- 



Knight, Robert E,L,, Associate Professor of Economics 

A.B . Harvard University, 1948; Ph.D., University of Califomia, 

Bert<eley. 1958. 

Knoche, Walter, Assistant Professor of Germanic and Slavic 

Languages 

B.A.. Marquette University, 1961; M.A., Ohio State University, 

1963; Ph.D. 1968. 

Kobayaski, Takao, Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineer- 
ing 

B.S., Nagoya Institute of Techology, 1966; M.S.. Illinois Insti- 
tute ol Technology. 1969; Ph.D., 1972. 

Koch, E, James, Visiting Lecturer in Horticulture 

B.S., Iowa State University, 1947; M.S.. North Carolina State 

University, 1949. 

Kolker, Robert P„ Associate Professor ol Speech and Dramatk: 

Art 

B.A.. Queens College. 1962; MA.. Syracuse University, 1964; 

Ph.D.. Columbia University. 1969. 

Koopman, David W,, Research Professor. Institute for Fluk] 
Dynamics and Applied Mathematics 

B.A . Amherst College. 1957;MS,. University ol Michigan, 1959; 
Ph D,, 1964. 

Koopman, Elizabeth Janssen, Assistant Professor of Human 
Development Education 

A B.. University of Michigan, 1960, M.A., 1963; Ph.D., University 
of Maryland. 1973. 

Korenman, Victor, Associate Professor of Physics 

B A . Princeton University, 1958; M.A., Harvard University. 1959; 

Ph.D., 1966. 



Koury, Enver M., Associate Professor of Government and Poli- 
tics 

B A., George Washington University. 1953: PhD , American Uni- 
versity. 1958. 

Kramer, Amihud, Professor of Horticulture 

B.S,. University of Maryland. 1938; M.S . 1939; Ph.D.. 1942. 

Kramer, George F., Professor of Physical Education 

B.S., University of Maryland. 1953; M.A.. 1956; PhD . Louisiana 

State University. 1967, 

Krass, Jerry R., Assistant Professor of Philosophy 
B.A.. Pacific Lutheran University. 1961 ; MA, University of Michi- 
gan. 1962; Ph.D.. 1967 

Krisher, Lawrence C, Professor, Institute for Physical Science 
and Technology 

A.B. Syracuse University. 1955; A.M.. Harvard University, 1957 
Ph.D.. 1959- 

Krusberg, Lorin R., Professor of Botany 

B.S.. University of Delaware. 1954; M.S.. North Carolina State 

College. 1956. PhD , 1959, 

Kuehl, Phillip G., Associate Professor of Business and Manage- 
ment 

B.B.S-. Miami University. 1965; M.B.A.. Ohio State University 
1967; Ph.D.. 1970. 

Kueker, Oavid W., Associate Professor of Mathematics 
A.B.. University of Califomia. Los Angeles. 1964; M.A.. 1966; 
Ph.D.. 1967. 

Kuenzel, Wayne J., Assistant Professor of Poultry Science 
B.S,. Bucknell University. 1964; M.S.. 1966; Ph D.. University of 
Georgia. 1969. 

Kuhn, Terry Lee, Assistant Professor of Music 

B.S.. University of Oregon. 1963; M.M.E,. 1%7; PhD Florida 

State University. 1972. 

Kumar, Parmeswar C, Assistant Professor of Business and 

Management 

B.Sc.. University of Bombay. 1956; M.S.. University of Banda. 

1960;D.B.Sa.. University of Madras. 1971. Ph.D.. Pennsylvania 

State University. 1975. 

Kundu, Mukul R., Professor of Astronomy 

B.Sc. Calcutta University. 1949; M.Sc. 1951; D.Sc. University 

of Paris. 1957. 

Kunkle, William E., Assistant Professor of Animal Science 
B.S,. Ohio State University. 1970; M.S.. 1970; Ph.D.. 1974. 

Kurtz, John J., Professor. Institute For Child Study 
B.A.. University of Wisconsin. 1935; M.A.. Northwestern Univer- 
sity. 1940; Ph.D.. University of Chicago. 1949. 

Kuss, Frederick R., Associate Professor. Recreation 

B.S,. University of New Hampshire. 1948. M.S.. 1950; Ph D,. 

Cornell University. 1968. 

Kyle, David G.. Associate Professor. Institute for Child Study 
B.A .University of Denver. 1952; MA,. 1953; Ed. D. University of 
Maryland. 1961 

Laffer, Norman C, Professor of Microbiology 

B.S,. Allegheny College. 1929. MS.. University of Maine. 1932. 

Ph D . University of Illinois. 1937, 

Lakshmanan, Sitarama, Associate Professor of Chemistry 
B.Sc. University of Annamalai. 1946; M.A.. 1949; PhD . Univer- 
sity of Maryland. 1954 

Lambour, Gary P., Assistant Professor of Special Education 
BA. Saint Francis College. 1967. M Ed . University of Pitts- 
burgh. 1969; Ph D . Ohio State University. 1975 

Lamone, Rudolph P.. Professor and Dean of the College of 

Business and Management 

B.S,. University of North Carolina. 1960; Ph.D.. 1966 

Lampe, John R., Assistant Professor of History 

B.A.. Harvard University. 1957; M.A.. University of Minnesota. 

1964; Ph D . University of Wisconsin. 1971 

Landry, L. Bartholomew, Assistant Professor of Sociology 
A.A.. St, Michael's Seminary. 1959. BA. 1961 ;B,A . Xavier Uni- 
versity. 1966; Ph D . Columbia University. 1971. 

Lanning, Eldon W., Assistant Professor of Government and 
Politics 

B.S.. Northwestern University. 1960; PhD . University of Vir- 
ginia. 1965 

Laplnski, Tadeusz, Associate Professor of Art 
M.F A . Academy of Fine Arts (Poland). 1955 

Larkin, Wlllard D., Associate Professor of Psychology 
B.S.. University of Michigan. 1959. MA,. University of Penn- 
sylvania. 1963. Ph.D.. University of Illinois. 1967 

Lashjnsky, Hertjert, Research Professor. Institute for Physical 
Science and Technology 

B.Sc. City College of New Yorl<. 1950; Ph.D.. Columbia Univer- 
sity. 1961 

Lawrence, Richard E., Associate Professor of Counseling and 

Personnel Services 

B.S,. Michigan State University. 1955; M.A.. 1957; Ph.D.. 1965. 

Lawrence, Robert G., Associate Professor, Agricultural and Re- 
source Economics 

B.Sc. University of Oklahoma. 1957. MBA.. 1960. PhD. Texas 
ASM University, 1970, 



Lawson, Lewis A., Professor of English 

OS , East Tennessee State College. 1957; MA. 1959. Ph D . 

University of Wisconsin. 1964, 

Lay, Oavid D., Associate Professor of Mathematics 

BA,. Aurora College. 1962; MA,. University of California Los 

Angeles. 1965; Ph.D.. 1966. 

Layman, John W., Associate Professor of Secondary Education 
and Physics 

B A . Park College. 1955; MS. Temple University. 1962. Ed D . 
Oklahoma State University. 1970 

Lee, Chi H., Associate Professor of Electrical Engineenng 
OS. National Taiwan University. 1 959; M.S.. Han/ard University. 
1962; Ph D. 1968 

Lee, Richard W., Assistant Professor of Journalism 
B S . University of Illinois. 1956: MA.. Southern Illinois Univer- 
sity. 1964. PhD . University of Iowa. 1972. 

Lee, Young Jack, Assistant Professor of Mathematics 
BSE. Seoul National University, 1964; M.S., Ohio State Univer- 
sity, 1972. PhD. 1974 

Leedy, Charlotte A., Assistant Professor. Recreation 
B S . University of Maryland. 1960; M.A.. 1966. 

Leeper, Sarah L., Professor. Early Childhood and Elementary 

Education 

A B,. Florida Stale College for Women. 1932, MA. Florida State 

University. 1947. Ed.D . 1953. 

Leete, Burt A., Associate Professor of Business and Manage- 
ment 

B S,. Juniata College. 1962: MBA,. University of Maryland. 
1964. J.D., American University. 1969. 

Leffel, Emory C, Professor of Animal Science 

B.S . University of Maryland. 1943: MS. 1947; Ph.D.. 1953 

Lehner, Guydo R., Professor of Mathematics 

BS . Loyola University. 1951. M.S. University of Wisconsin. 

1953. Ph D. 1958 

Lejins, Peter P., Professor and Director. Institute of Cnmmal 
Justice and Criminology 

Ph M . University of Latvia. 1930; L.L.M.. 1933: Ph D . Univer- 
sity of Chicago. 1938 

Lembach, John, Professor of Education and Art 
B A.. University of Chicago. 1934. MA. Nonhwestern Univer- 
sity. 1937; Ed.D . Columbia University. 1946 

Lengermann, Joseph J., Associate Professor of Sociology 
A B . University of Notre Dame. 1958. M.A.. 1964. Ph.D., Cornell 
University. 1969 

Leonard, Mary Margaret, Assistant Professor of Counseling 
and Personnel Services 

B.S.. R.N,. Boston College. 1968; MA,. University of Minnesota. 
1970: Ph.D.. 1974, 

Lepper, Henry A., Jr., Professor of Civil Engineenng 

B.S . George Washington University. 1936: M.S.. University of 

Illinois. 1938: D Eng.. Yale University. 1947, 

Lesher, James H„ Associate Professor of Philosophy 

BA . University of Virginia. 1962; Ph.D.. University of Rochester. 

1966 

Lessley, Billy V., Professor and Acting Chairman. Agncullural 
and Resource Economics 

BS-. University of Arisansas. 1 957; M.S., 1 960: PhD.. University 
of Missouri. 1965 

Levine, Marvin J., Professor. Business and Management 

B A.. University of Wisconsin. 1952; J.D . 1954. M.A.. 1959; 

PhD . 1964, 

Levine, Stephen, Assistant Professor of Counseling and Per- 
sonnel Services 

AB.HunterCollege. 1967; M.S.E.. 1969; Ph.D. Hofstra Univer- 
sity. 1972. 

Levine, William S., Associate Professor of Electrical Engineer- 



Levjnson, John Z., Professor of Psychology 

BA,. University of Toronto. 1939. MA. 1940; Ph D.. 1948. 

Levitan, Hert>ert, Associate Professor of Zoology 
BEE,. Cornell University. 1962: Ph.D.. 1965, 

Levitine, George, Professor and Chairman of Art 

B A.. University of Pans. 1938; MA.. Boston University. 1946. 

Ph D,. Han/ard University. 1952 

Leviton, Daniel, Professor of Health Education 
B S . George Washington University. 1953: M.S.. Spnngfield Col- 
lege, 1956; PhD . University of Maryland. 1967, 

Liet}erman, Charles, Assistant Professor of Economics 
B S . Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 1970: AM.. Univer- 
sity of Pennsylvania. 1972: Ph.D.. 1974 

Liesener, James W., Professor, College of Library and Informa- 
tion Services 

BA., Wartburg College. 1955; M.A.. University of Northern In- 
diana. 1960. A MLS. Universityof Michigan. 1962. PhD.. 1967 

Ligomenides, Panos A., Professor of Electncal Engineenng 
Diploma. University of Athens, 1951 : Gr. Spec. D,. 1952. MS . 
Stanford University. 1956; Ph.D.. 1958. 



Lin, Hung Chang, Professor of Electrical Engineering 
BS.. Chiao-Tung University. 1941. M S E . University of Michi- 
gan. 1948. DEE. Polytechnic Institute of Brooklyn. 1956 

LInder, Harris, J., Associate Professor of Zoology 

BS. Long Island University. 1951; M.S. Cornell University, 

1955; PhD . 1958 

Lindsay, Rao H., Associate Professor. Social Foundations of 
Education 

B A. Brigham Young University. 1954. MA. 1958. MA,. Uni- 
versity of Michigan. 1963: Ph D . 1964 

Link, Conrad B., Professor of Horticulture 

B S,. Ohio State University. 1933. M S . 1934. Ph D . 1940 

Linkow, Irving, Associate Professor of Speech and Dramatic Art 
B.A,. University of Denver. 1937. MA.. 1938, 

Lipsman, Ronald L., Professor of Mathematics 
B.S,. City College of New York. 1964; PhD . Massachusetts In- 
stitute of Technology. 1967. 

Liu, Chuan Shen, Professor. Physics and Astronomy 
Tunghai University (Taiwan). 1960. MA,. University of Califomia 
(Beri<eley). 1964; Ph D . 1968 

Liu, Tai-Ping, Assistant Professor of Mathematics 
B S . National Taiwan University. 1968. M S . Oregon State Uni- 
versity. 1970: Ph D,. University of Michigan. 1973 

Lockard, J. David, Professor of Secondary Education and Asso- 
ciate Professor of Botany 

B S . Pennsylvania State University, 1951; M Ed . 1955; Ph.D., 
1962 

Locke, Edwin A., Professor of Business and Management and 

Psychology 

B A . Harvard University. 1960: MA. Cornell University. 1962: 

Ph D,. 1964 

Loeb, Stephen E., Professor of Business and Management 
BS. University of Pennsylvania. 1961. MBA. University of 
Wisconsin. 1963; PhD. 1970 

Longest, James W., Professor of Agncultural and Extension 
Education 

B.S . University of Illinois. 1951. M.S.. 1953: Ph D . Cornell Uni- 
versity. 1957. 

Longley, Edward L., Jr., Associate Professor of Secondary 

Education 

B.A.. University of Maryland. 1950; M.A., Columbia University. 

1953; Ed D.. Pennsylvania State University, 1967 

Lopez-Escobar, Edgar G., Professor of Mathematics 
B A , University of Cambridge. 1958: M.A.. University of Cali- 
fornia. Berkeley. 1961; PhD . 1965. 

Lounsbury, Myron O., Associate Professor and Chairman of 
American Studies 

B.A . Duke University. 1961; MA,. University of Pennsylvania. 
1962. PhD . 1966 

Luetkemeyer, Joseph F., Professor of Industnal Education 
B S.. Stout State College. 1953. MS. 1954; Ed D,. Universityof 
Illinois. 1961. 

Lutwack, Leonard I., Professor of English 

B A . Weselyan University. 1939: M.A.. 1940; PhD . Ohio State 

University. 1950. 

Lynch, James B., Jr., Professor of Art 

A.B . Harvard University. 1941; AM,. 1947. PhD . 1960 

Lynn, Jeftrey W., Assistant Professor. Physics and Astronomy 
B S . Georgia Institute of Technology. 1969. M.S.. 1970; Ph.D.. 
1974, 

MacBain, William, Professor. French and Italian Language and 

Literature 

M A . University of Saint Andrews. 1952; PhD,. 1955 

MacDonald, William M.. Professor of Physics 

BS . Universityof Pittsburgh. 1950. Ph.D.. Princeton. University, 

1955 

Mack, Maynard, Jr., Associate Professor of English 
BA . Yale University. 1964. Ph.D.. 1969. 

MacLeod, Anne S.. Assistant Professor of Library and Informa- 
tion Sen/ices 

B A . University of Chicago. 1948: M.L.S.. University of Mary- 
land. 1966; Ph D . 1973 

MacQuillan, Anthony M., Associate Professor of Microbiology 
BS.A,. University of Brtish Columbia. 1956: M.S.. 1958. PhD . 
University of Wisconsin. 1962 

MacReady, George B., Associate Professor of Measurements 
and Statistics 

B A,. Williamene University. 1965: M A.. University of Oregon. 
1967; Ph.D.. University of Minnesota. 1972. 

Madison, John P., Assistant Professor. Early Childhood. Ele- 
mentary Education 

B S . Stale University College of New York (Geneseo). 1962: 
MS . 1965: EdD . University of Illinois. 1972 

Magoon, Thomas M., Professor of Psychology and Counseling 
and Personnel Sen/ices. Director. Counseling Center 
BA,. Dartmouth College. 1947: M A . University of Minnesota. 
1951: PhD . 1954 

Maida, Peter R., Associate Professor of Cnminal Justice and 

Cnminology 

B.A.. St, Vincent College. 1960: M. A.. Fordham University. 1962. 

Ph D Pennsylvania State University. 1969, 



Graduate Faculty / 37 



Mafeska, George P., Assistant Professor of History 

A.B., Brooklyn College, 1961; MA.. Indiana University. 1964; 

Ph.D . 1968, 

Ma|eskie, J. Lee, Assistant Professor, Dairy Science 

B.S-, University of Wisconsin, 1964, M.S , 1966, Pti D,, Kansas 

State University, 1 970. 

Male, George A,, Professor, Social Foundations of Education 
B.A.. University ol Michigan, 1948; MA., 1949; Pti.D . 1952 

Maley, Donald, Professor and Chairman of Industnal Education 
8 S.. California State College of Pennsylvania, 1943; M.S., Uni- 
versity of Maryland, 1947, Ph D., 1949 

Marando, Vincent L., Associate Professor, Acting Director. In- 
stitute for Urban Studies 

B.S.. State University College. Buffalo. 1960; MA , Michigan 
State University. 1964; Ph.D.. 1967 

Marchello, Joseph M., Provost. Division of Mathematical and 

Physical Sciences and Engineenng and Professor of Chemical 

Engineenng 

B.S.. University of Illinois, 1955; Ph.D., Carnegie Institute of 

Technology, 1959 

MarclnkowskI, M. John, Professor of Mechanical Engineenng, 
Engineenng Matenal 

B.ST.. University of Maryland. 1953; M.S., University of Penn- 
sylvania, 1955; Ph.D., 1959 

Marcus, Robert F,, Assistant Professor of Human Development 

Education 

B.A., Montclair State College. 1965; M.A.. New York University, 

1967, Ph D., Pennsylvania State University. 1973 

Marll, Herman, Professor of Art 

Graduate, The Maryland Institute of Fine Arts, 1 928. 

Marlon, Jerry B., Prolessor of Physics 
B.A., Reed College, 1952; M.S., Rice University, 1953; Ph D , 
1955. 

Markley, Nelson G., Associate Professor ol Mathematics and 
Statistics 

B.A., Lafayette College, 1962; MA, Yale University, 1964; Ph.D., 
1966. 

Marks, Colin H.. Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineer- 
ing 

B.S., Carnegie Institute of Technology, 1956; M.S., 1957; PhD , 
University of Maryland, 1965, 
Marquardt, Warren W,, Associate Professor of Vetennary Sci- 

B.S.. University of Minnesota, 1959; D.V.M.. 1961; Ph.D., 1970. 

Marra-Lopez, Jose R., Professor of Spanish 

B.A., Nra. Sra. del Pilar, 1949; MA . University ol Madrid, 1959. 

Marrls, Robert L., Professor and Chairman, Economics 
B.A., Cambridge University, 1947; ScD., 1968. 

Martin, David L., Associate Professor of Chemistry 
B.S.. University of Minnesota, 1963, M.S., University of Wiscon- 
sin, 1965; Ph D , 1968 

Martin, Frederick W., Assistant Professor ol Physics 

A.B., Pnnceton University, 1957, M.S., Yale University, 1958; 

Ph.D., 1964. 

Martin, James G., Professor of Psychology 
B.S., University of Nonha Dakota, 1951 ; M.A., University of Min- 
nesota. 1958; PhD . 1960. 

Martin, L., John, Professor ot Journalism 

B.A.. American University of Cairo. 1947; M.A.. University ol 

Minnesota. 1951; PhD., 1955. 

Martin, Raymond F., Associate Professor of Philosophy 

B.A . Ohio Slate University. 1962; MA. 1964, Ph D , University 

of Rochester, 1968. 

Marx, George L., Professor and Chairman of Counseling and 

Personnel Services 

B.A.. Yankton College, 1953; MA., State University of Iowa. 

1958; Ph.D.. State University of Iowa, 1959 

Mather, Ian H., Assistant Professor of Dairy Science 
B.Sc. University College ol North Wales, 1%6; Ph D , 1969 

Matosslan, Mary K,, Associate Professor of History 

B.A., Stanford University. 1951. M.A.. American University ot 

Beinjt, 1952, Ph D , Stanford University, 1955 

Matteson, Richard L., Associate Professor, Institute For Child 
Study 

B.A., Knox College, 1952; M.A.. University of Maryland. 1955; 
Ed.D . 1962 

Matthew, Gary K., Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineer- 
ing 
B.S., University of Flonda. 1970; ME. 1973, Ph D., 1975, 

Matthews, David L., Research Associate Professor. Institute for 

Fluid Dynamics and Applied Mathematics 

B.S , Queens University, 1949; Ph D . Pnnceton University. 1959 

Matthews, Thomas A., Associate Professor ot Astronomy 
B A,, University of Toronto. 1950, MS . Case Institute of Tech- 
nology. 1951. Ph.D.. Han/ard University. 1956 

Mattick, Joseph F., Professor of Dairy Science 

B.S., Pennsylvania State University, 1942; Ph.D., 1950. 

May, Gordon S., Assistant Professor of Business and Manage- 
ment 

B.S.B.A., Wittenberg University, 1964, M.B.A., University of 
Michigan, 1965; Ph.D.. Michigan State University, 1972, 



Mayer-Sommer, Alan P., Assistant Professor of Business and 

Management 

B,A.. Columbia University, 1963; MB. A.. Han/ard University. 

1965, MPA.. Georgia State University. 1974; 

Ph.D.. 1976. 

Mayes, Sharon S., Assistant Professor of Sociology 

8 A,. Michigan State University. 1970; M Phil.. Yale University. 

1972. PhD . 1974 

Mayo, Marlene J., Associate Professor of History 

B.A., Wayne University, 1954, M.A., Columbia University. 1957. 

Ph.D.. 1961 

Mazzocchi, Paul H., Associate Professor ot Chemistry 
B.S., Queens College. 1961. Ph D . Fordham University. 1966 

McCall, James P., Assistant Professor of Animal Science 
B.S . Texas ASM University. 1966. MS. 1969; PhD . 1972, 

McCarrick, Earleen M., Assistant Professor of Government and 

Politics 

B A., Louisiana State University. 1953; M.A., 1955; Ph.D.. Van- 

derbilt University. 1964 

McClellan, Gene E,, Assistant Professor of Physics 

BS , Iowa State University, 1965; M.S. Cornell University. 1968; 

PhD . 1970, 

McClellan, Michael T., Assistant Professor of Computer Sci- 
ence 

B.S . Marquette University. 1960. M.S.. University of Wisconsin. 
1962; Ph.D.. 1971. 

McClure, L. Morris, Professor of Administration. Supervision 
and Curriculum 

B.A . Western Michigan University. 1940. IVI A . University of 
Michigan, 1946; Ed.D . Michigan University. 1953 

McCrank, Lawrence J., Assistant Professor of Library and In- 
formation Services 

B A,, Moorshead State University, 1967; MA., University of Kan- 
sas. 1970. ML S.. University of Oregon. 1976; Ph.D.. Univer- 
sity of Virginia. 1974 

McCuen, Richard H., Associate Professor of Civil Engineenng 
B.S., Carnegie-Mellon University. 1967; M.S , Georgia Institute 
ol Technology. 1969. Ph.D. 1971 

McCusker, John J,, Assistant Professor of History 

8 A , St Bernards College, 1 961 ; MA., University ol Rochester, 

1963; PhD . University of Pittsburgh, 1970 

McDonald, Frank B., Professor of Physics 

8 S-, Duke University, 1948; M,S,, University of Minnesota, 

1952; PhD, 1955 

McElreath, Mark P., Assistant Professor, College of Journalism 
B.A , University of Houston. 1969. MA,. University of Wisconsin. 
1972. PhD. 1975 

McGuire, Martin, Professor of Economics 

B A . Oxford University. 1958; Ph.D.. Harvard University. 1964. 

Mcllrath, Thomas J.. Associate ol Professor of Physics and In- 
stitute for Physical Science and Technology 
B S . Michigan State University. 1960. Ph D , 1966, 

Mclntire, Roger W., Professor of Psychology 
8 A.. Northwestern University. 1958. MA. Louisiana State Uni- 
versity. 1960. Ph.D. 1962. 

Mclntyre, Jennie J., Associate Professor of Sociology 

B.A . Howard College. 1960; MS. Florida State College. 1962; 

PhD . 1966 

McLoone, Eugene P„ Associate Professor of Administration, 
Supervision and Curnculum and Economics 
B.A,, LaSalle College, 1951, MS,, University of Denver, 1952; 
Ph.D.. University ol Illinois. 1961 

McMullan, Yyonne D., Assistant Professor of Counseling & 
Personnel Services 

B.A., Emory University. 1969; M.Ed , Georgia State University. 
1970; Ph.D., 1973 

McNetly, Theodore H., Professor ol Government and Politics 
B.S . University of Wisconsin, 1941;M.A,. 1942; Ph.D. Columbia 
University. 1952 

McNesby, James, Visiting Prolessor and Acting Chairman of 

Chemistry 

B.S . Ohio University. 1943; Ph D,. New Yori( University. 1951 

McSpaden, Jay 8., Assistant Professor. Heanng and Speech 
Sciences 

B.A.. Mount Angel College, 1967, MS . Oregon College of Edu- 
cation, 1968; Ph D , University ol Washington, 1971 

McWhInnie, Harold J„ Lecturer in Applied Design and Crafts 
and Associate Prolessor ol Secondary Education 
B.A.E,, Art Institute ot Chicago, 1953; M,F A,, University ol Chi- 
cago, 1957; Ed D , Stanford University, 1966 

Measday, Walter S., Lecturer of Economics 
AS.. College of William and Mary. 1941; Ph.D., Massachusetts 
Institute ot Technology. 1955 

Medvene, Arnold, Associate Prolessor of Counseling and Per- 
sonnel Services and Counselor. Counseling Center 
BS . Temple University. 1959. M.E., 1963; Ed.D., University ol 
Kansas. 1968 

Meeker, Barbara F., Associate Prolessor ol Sociology 

B A,, University of Kansas, 1961, MA,, Stanford University, 

1963, PhD., 1966. 



Meersman, Roger L., Professor of Speech and Dramatic Art 
B.A. St Ambrose College. 1952. MA. University ot Illinois. 
1959; PhD. 1962 

Meljer, Marianne S., Assistant Professor of French and Italian 
Baccalaureat de L Enseignement Secondaire Francais. 1944; 
Candidaats Romaanse Taal — en Litterkrunde, Leiden, 1948. 
M.A.. Catholic University. 1960; Ph D . 1972 

Melnick, Daniel, Assistant Professor of Government and Poli- 
tics 
B.A , University ol Wisconsin. 1963; M.A.. 1964. Ph.D.. 1970. 

Mllnik, Walter L., Professor of Aerospace Engineering 

BS,. University ol Minnesota. 1951. M.S.. 1953; PhD.. 1964 

Meltzer, Richard H., Assistant Professor of Psychology 
B.A.. Johns Hopkins University. 1968; Ph D . University of Cali- 
fornia. San Diego. 1971. 

Mendeloff , Henry, Professor and Chairman of Spanish and Por- 
tuguese 

B.S.. City College ol New Yori^. 1936; M.S.. 1939; Ph.D.. Catho- 
lic University of Amenca. i960. 

Menzer, Rot>ert E., Professor of Entomology and Associate 
Dean for Graduate Studies 

BS,, University of Pennsylvania. 1960; M.S , University of Mary- 
land. 1962. Ph D . University of Wisconsin. 1964. 

Merkel, James A., Associate Professor of Agricultural Engi- 
neenng 

B.S . Pennsylvania State University. 1962; M.S.. Iowa Slate Uni- 
versity, 1965; PhD . 1967. 

Merrill, Horace S., Professor of History 
BE . Wisconsin State University. 1 932; Ph. M. University ot Wis- 
consin. 1933; Ph.D., 1942, 

Messersmith, Donald H., Professor of Entomology 

8 Ed,, University of Toledo, 1951 ; MS,, University ol Michigan, 

1953; PhD,. Virginia Polytechnic Institute. 1962. 



Meyer, Paul A., Associate Professor of Economics 
B.A.. The Johns Hopkins University. 1961; M.A.. Stanford Uni- 
versity. 1963; Ph D . 1966 

MIetus, Walter S., Associate Prolessor ol Industnal Education 
BS. Chicago Teachers College. 1957; M Ed.. 1959; Ed.D. 
Loyola University. 1966. 

Mtgliazza, Ernest, Assistant Professor of Anthroplogy 
B.A . Indiana University. 1963; M.A.. 1968. Ph.D.. 1972 

MIkulskI, Piotr W., Professor ot Mathematics 

Diploma. Main School ol Planning and Statistics, Warsaw, 

1951; Masters, 1952; Ph.D., University ot California, 1962 

Mllhollan, Frank, Associate Protesstr, Institute For Child Study 
B.A,. Colorado College, 1949; MPS . University of Colorado, 
1951, PhD . University of Nebraska. 1966 

Miller, Catherine M., Associate Professor ol Health Education 
B S.. Illinois State University. 1956; MA. Colorado State Col- 
lege, 1959, PhD . Ohio State University. 1967 

Miller, Douglas R., Associate Professor of Entomology 

B.S., University of California. Davis. 1964; M.S.. 1965. Ph.D.. 

1969 

Miller, Frederick P.. Professor, Agronomy 

BS , Ohio State University, 1958; M.S.. 1961. PhD,. 1965, 

Miller, Gerald Ray, Associate Prolessor of Chemistry 

BS . University ol Wisconsin. 1958; M.S.. University ol Illinois. 

1960. PhD,. 1962, 

Miller, James R., Prolessor and Chairman of Agronomy 
BS,. University ol Maryland. 1951; M.S.. 1953; Ph.D.. 1956, 

Miller, Mary R., Associate Prolessor ol English 

B A . University of Iowa, 1941; M.A.. University ot Denver. 1959; 

Ph D.. Georgetown University. 1969 

Miller. Paula Jean, Assistant Prolessor ol Sociology 

B.A,. University ol Texas. Austin, 1969; MA,, 1971; PhD,, 1974 

Mills. David H., Prolessor ol Psychology and Assistant Director, 
Counseling Center 

BS,, Iowa State University, 1955, MS, 1957, PhD., Michigan 
State University, 1964, 

Mills, David L., Assistant Prolessor ol Computer Science 
B S E . Engineenng. University of Michigan, 1960; BSE . Math- 
ematics, 1961, M SE , 1962; M.S.. 1964; PhD. 1964 

Mills, Judson B., Prolessor ol Psychology 

B S., University ol Wisconsin. 1953, Ph.D., Stanford University. 

1958 

Minker, Jack. Professor ol Computer Science 

8. A.. Brooklyn College. 1949; MS . University ol Wisconsin. 

1950; Ph D,. University ot Pennsylvania, 1959 

Minor, W, William, Assistant Prolessor, Institute ol Cnmimal 
Justice and Cnminology 

8 S , Michigan State University, 1968, MS., Flonda State Uni- 
versity, 1973; PhD, 1975 

MIntz, Lawrence E,, Associate Professor of American Studies 
8 A., University ol South Carolina. 1966; MA,. Michigan State 
University. 1967; Ph D . 1969, 

Mish, Charles C, Prolessor ol English 

BS . University ol Pennsylvania. 1936. MA . 1946; Ph.D., 1951. 



38 / Graduate Faculty 



Mlsner, Charles W.. Professor o* Physics 

8-S., University of Notre Dame. 1952. M A.. PnrKeton Unrversfty 

1954; PhD . 1957 

Mitctiell, Robert D., Associate Professor of Geography 
MA. University of Glasgow. 1962: Ph D-. University of Wiscon- 
sin. 1969 

Mohanty, Sastii B., Professor of Vetennary Science 

B V.Sc & A.H . Bihar University. India. 1956: MS.. University of 

Maryland. 1961. Ph. D. 1963 

Montero, Dairel M., Assistant Professor of Urt>an Studies 
B.A . California State University. 1970: M A.. 1972: Ph D . 1974 

Montgomery, William, Associate Professor of Music 

B M.E . Cornell College of Iowa. 1953. MM.. Catholic Univefsify 
of Amenca. 1957: Ph D . 1972 

Moore, John H., Jr., Associate Professor of Cr>emistry 
B S . Carnegie Institute of Technology. 1963: MS. Johns Hop- 
kins University. 1965. Ph D.. 1967 

Moore, John R., Professor of Agncuttural and Resources Eco- 
nomics 

B.S., Ohio Slate University, 195t . M S . Corrwll University. 1955: 
Ph.D.. University of Wisconsin. 1959 

Moore, Michael R., Assistant Professor of Speech and Dramatic 



Moore, Robert, Associate Professor of English 
B A.. Davidson College 1962 MA University of North Caro- 
lina, 1964. Ph D . University of Wisconsin. 1972 

Morgan, Oelbert, T., Jr., Professor of Botany 

B.S . Kent State University. 1940: MA. Columbia University. 

1942: PhD.. 1948- 

Morgan, H. Gerthon, Acting Dean. College of Education and 
Piolessor. Institute for Child Study 

B.A.. Furman University 194C. MA. University of Chicago. 
1943; Ph.D.. 1946. 

Morris, Alfred E., Jr., Assistant Professor. Physical Education 
BA.. University of Massachusetts. 1964 MA. Untversily of 
Maryland. 1966. Ph D . University of Massachusetts. 1976 

Morse, Douglass H., Associate Professor of Zoology 

B.S,. Bates College, 1960, MS University of Michigan. 1962. 

Ph D . Louisiana State University, 1965- 

Morse, Frederick H„ Adjunct Professor of Mechanical Engi- 

neenng 

B-S . Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. 1957. MS . Massactuj- 

setts Institute of Technotogy. 1959, Ph.D.. Stanford University. 

1969 

Morton. Eugene S., Assistant Professor of Zook>gy 

B.S . Denison University. 1962: M.S.. Yale University. 1966. 

PhD-. 1969- 

Moss, Lawrence K., Professor of Music 
B.A . University of California. Los Angeles, 1949; M.A., Univer- 
sity of Rochesiei. 1951. PhD. University of Souttiem California. 
1957 

Motta, Jerome F., Associate Professor of Botany 
B.A, San Francisco State College. 1959: MA,. 1964. Ph.D.. Uni- 
versity of California- Bert<e)ey. 1968- 

Mulchi, Charles L, Assoaate Professor of Agronomy 

B S North Carolina State University. 1964; M.S.. 1966; Ph D.. 

1970 

Mulinazzi, Thomas E., Assistant Professor of Civil Engineeruig 
B.S . Notre Dame. 1964. M.S.. Purdue University, 1966; Ph.D.. 
1973- 

Muller, Edward K„ Assistant Professor of Geography 

8-A-. Dartmouth Co::ege. 1965; MS., University of Wisconsin. 
1968; PhD.. 1972 

Munn, Robert J., Professor of Ctiemtstry 
B.S.. University of Bnstol, 1957: Ph D . 1961 

Munno, Frank J., Professor of Chemical Engineenng, Director 
Nuclear Engineenng 

B.S-. Waynesburg College. 1957. MS.. University of Fionda. 
1962: PhD . 1964 

Murphy, Charles D., Professor of English 

B.A-. University of Wisconsin. 1929; M.A-. Han/ard University. 

1930 Ph D , Cornel! University. 1940 

Murphy, Thomas J., Associate Professor of Chemistry 

B S . Fordham University 1963. Ph D.. Rockefeller Univereity, 

1968 

Murphy, Thomas P,, Professor. Urtjan Studies Inslrtute 

B.A . Queens College. 1952. MA. Georgetown University, i960; 

Ph D St John s University. 1963 

Murray, Ray A., Professor of Agriculture and Resource Eco- 



Myers, Ralph 0., Professor of Physics 

A B . Cornell University. 1934: A M.. 1935; PhD . 1937. 

Myers, Robert Manson, Professor of English 
B-A , Vanaerbil! University. 1941; MA.. Cokjmbia University, 
1942: MA.. Hazard University. 1943; Ph D., Columbia Univer- 
sity. 1948- 



Myricks, Noel, Associate Professor of Family and Community 

Development 

B A . San Francisco Stale University. 1965; MS.. 1967; J D . 

Howard University. 1970; EdD., American University, 1973 

Nash, Allan N., Professor of Busir>ess and Management 

B B A , University of Minnesota, 1957. M BA. 1959. Ph D . 1963 

Needle, Richard H., Assistant Professor of Health Education 
BS. Temple University. 1964. M Ed . University of ToledO- 
1967. Ph D . University ol Maryland. 1973. 

Nelson, Clifford L., Professor of Agncullural and Extension 
Education 

B S . Washington State University, 1957; M.S., 1962; Ph.D , Uni- 
versity ol Minnesota. 1 966 

Nelson, Judd A., Assistant Professor of Entomotogy 

B S University of Wisconsin 1969: MS . 1972: PhD . 1974 

Nemes, Graciela P., Professor of Spanish 

B S . Tnnity College. 1942. M.A-. University ol Maryland. 1946. 

Ph.D.. 1952 

Neri, Umberto, Associate Professor of Mattiematics 

B S . University of Chicago. 1961: MS 1962: PhD 1966 

Neumann, Walter, Assistant Pro'essor ol Mathematics 
B A-. Adelaide University. 1963; M.A.. 1966: Ph D . Bonn Univer- 
sity. 1969 

Newby, Hayes A., Professor ol Speech and Heanng Soences 
A B . Ohio Wesleyan University. 1935; M.A.. University ol towa. 
1939. Ph D . 1947 

Newcomb, Robert W., Professor oi Electrical Engineenng 
8 S . Purdue University. 1955. MS.. Stanford University. 1957: 
Ph D . University of Caiiromia. Berkeley. 1960. 

Newell, Clarence A,, Professor of Admintslralion. Supervision 
and Cumcuium 

A.B-. Hastings College. 1935. AM.. Columbia University. 1939 
PhD . 1943 

Newsom, D. Eari, Professor of Journalism 

BS. Oklahoma State University. 1948: M.S.J. Northwestern 

University. 1949: Ed D.. Oklahoma Stale University. 1957 

Nickels, William G., Associate Prolessor oi Business and Man- 
agement 

B S . Ohio State University. 1962. M 8 A.. Western Reserve Uni- 
versity. 1966 PhD . Ohio Stale University. 1969 
Nicklason, Fred, Assistant Professor of History 
BS . Gustavus Adolphus College. 1953; MA. University of 
Pennsylvania. 1955. Ph D . Yale University. 1967 

Niebur, Douglas P., Assistant Professor of Mattiematics 

BS Iowa Stale University. 1963. MS. University of Wisconsin. 

1965. Ph D . 1968 

Niese, Henry E., Associate Professor ol Art 

Cert . Ttie Cooper Union. 1949: Academic Grande Chaumiere. 
1949. B F A . Columbia Uni\'ersity. 1955. 

Niles, Lyndrey A., Lecturer m Speech and Dramatic An 
A.A . Canbbean Union College. 1956: B.A.. Columbia College. 
1963: M A-. University of Maryland. 1965; Ph.D.. Temple Univer- 
sity. 1973- 

Noll, James W., Associate Professor and Chaimian. Social 
Foundations ol Education 

BA, University ol Wisconsin. 1954; MS.. 1962; PhD . Universi- 
ty of Chicago, 1965 

Noonan, Rol>ert Edward, Assistant Professor of Computer Sa - 

erx:e 

A-B . Providence College. 1966; M.S.. Purdue University. 1968; 

PhD. 1971 

Norman, Kent L, Assistant Professor of Psychotogy 

B.A.. Southern Methodist University. 1969: MA. University ol 

Iowa. 1971. Ph.D. 1973 

Nossaman, Audrey, Assoaate Professor of Musk: 
S M Westminster Choir College. 1947 

O'Connell, Donald W., Professor of Economics and Vice Presi- 
dent far General Administration 
B A-. Columbia University. 1937. MA. 1938. PhD-, 1953. 

Odell, Stanley Jac< Assistant Professor of Phitosophy 

8 A-, University of Kansas, i960. M A.. University ol Illinois. 

1962: PhD. 1967 

O'Gallagher, Joseph J., Assistant Professor of Physics 
B S Massachusetts Institute of Technokigy. 1961 ; MS.. Univer- 
sity ol Chicago. 1962, Ph D . 1967 

O'Grady, E. Pearse, Assistant Professor of Electncai Engineer- 



O'Haver, Thomas C, Associate Professor of Chemistry 
B.S , Spnng Hill College. 1963: PhD . University of Ftonda. 
1968 

O'Leary, Ronald T., Associate Professor of Speech and Drama- 
tic Art 

BS Bowling Green Slate University. 1960: MA.. 1961 :M. FA.. 
Universit> ol Wisconsin. 1964; PhD . 1966 

Oliver, James H,, Assistant Professor of Government and Poli- 
tics 

B.A . University of Washington. 1959; MA, 1962; Ph.D., Univer- 
sity of Wisconsin. 1968. 



Olson, Alison Gilbert, Professor of History 

8 A. University ol California. 1952: MA.. 1953. F>h D . Oxford 

University. 1955- 

Olson, Edwin E., Professor, College of bbrary and Information 

Services 

B A . St Olaf College. 1959: MA American University. 1961; 

Ph D 1966 

Olson, Keith W„ Assoaate Professor of History 

B A . State University of Het York. Albany 1957. MA. 1959. 

PhD . University of Wisconsin. 1964 

Olson. Mancur L, Jr., Prolessor ol Economics 
BS. North Dakota State University, 1954. B A . Oxford Universi- 
ty. 1956. M A . 1960. Ph D . Harvard University. 1960 

Olver, Frank W, J., Research Professor. Inslrtute lor Physical 

Science and Technotogy. and MattiematKS 

BSc . Universtyol London. 1945: M Sc.. 1948. D.Sc. 1961 

Oneda, Sadso, Prolessor of Physks 

B S . Tohoku University. 1946: M Sc . 1948. Ph D . Nagoya Uni- 
versity. 1953 

O'Neill, Leo W„ Jr., Prolessor ol Early ChikWxxxJ and Elemeo- 
lary Education 

B A , University ol Chicago. 1938. MA. University of Kansas. 
1953. Ed.D . University of Cotorado. 1955 

Opik. Ernst J.. Professor of AstrorxMry 
Cand. Astro.. Moscow Impenal University. 1916. D.PhilNat. Na- 
tional University of Estonia. 1 923 

Oppenheimer, Joe A., Assoaate Prolessor. Government and 

Politics 

A B . Cornell University. 1963. MA . University ol Michigan, 

.964: Ph D . Pnnceton University. 1971 

Osbom, John E., Professor of Mattiematics 

B S . University of Minnesota. 1958: M.S.. 1963. PhD . 1965. 

Osterhouse. Robert A, Assistant Professor of Psycfx)togy 
BA, Whjtworth College, 1964. MA. Ohio SUte University 
1968. PhD . 1969 

Ostrowski, Paul P,. Assistant Prolessor of Mechanical Engn 

neenng 

B.S.. University of Maryland, 1963; M.E., McGill University. 

1970: Ph D . 1974 

Otts, Louis E., Jr,. Professor ol Civil Engineenng 
8 A East Texas State University. 1933: B S . Texas A&M Uni- 
versity. 1946: M.S.. 1946- 

Owings, James C, Assoaate Professor of Mathematics 

B S , Dartmouth College, 1962: PhD.. Cornell University. 1966- 

Ousby, Ian, Assistant Prolessor. English 

B.A.. Cambndge University (England). 1968: MA. 1972. Ph D . 

Harvard University. 1973 

Paez, Mario D., Assistant Prolessor of Electncai Engineering 
B.S.. Instituto Tecnokjgica de Monterrey. 1959. MS . Camegie 
Institute of Technotogy. 1965: PhD . North Carolina State Uni- 
versity 1972 

Pal, Shih-I. Research Prolessor, Institute for F\ukS Dynamics 
and Applied Mathematics 

B-S-. National Central University. 1935; M.S.. Massachusetts In- 
stitute of Technology. 1938; Ph D.. Califomia Institute of Tech- 
nology. 1938. Ph D.. California Institute ol Technotogy. 1940. 

Paine, Frank T„ Prolessor ol Business and Management 

B S Syracuse University. 1951; MBA. 1956: Ph D . Stanford 

University. 1963 

Panichas, George A, Professor of English 
BA.. Amencan Intemanonal College. 1951; MA, Trinity Col- 
lege. 1952: Ph D . Nottingham University. 1961 

Park, Robert L. Professor Physics and Astronomy Director. 
Center for Matenals Research 

8S University of Texas lAustinl. 1958. MA. 1960: PhD. 
Brown University. 1964 

Parming, Tonu, Professor. Sociotogy 

B A-. Pnncelon University. 1964. MA.. Yale University. 1973 

Parochetti, James V.. Assoaate Professor of Agronomy 

8 S University of Illinois. 1962; MS. Purdue University. 1964. 

Ph D . 1967 

Pasch, Alan, Prolessor of Phitosophy 

B A . University ol Michigan. 1949; MA.. New SclxM for Social 

Research. 1952. Ph D Pnnceton University. 1955. 

Rati, Jogesh C, Professor of Physrcs 

BS .UtkalUniversity. 1955. M-Sc. Delhi University. 1957; Ph.D., 

University ol Maryland. 1960- 

Patterson, Glenn W„ Prolessor ol Botany 

B.S-, North Carolina State University. 1960: MS . Universiiy ol 

Maryland, 1963. Ph D . 1964. 

Pavey, Stanley. Assoaate Professor of Psychotogy and Coun- 
selor. Counseling Center 

B A-. City College of New Yorti. 1952: M.S.. 1955: Ph.D.. Ohto 
State University. I96i 

Peari. Martin Hert>ert. Professor of MathematK:s 

8 A. Brooklyn College. 1950. MA. University of Michigan. 

1951; Ph D . University of Wisconsin. 1955 

Pease, John. Associate Professor of Socwtogy 

B.S . Western Michigan University. 1960: M A,. Michigan State 

University. 1963: Ph D . 1968 



Graduate Faculty / 39 



Pechacek, Robert E., Associate Professor ot Physics 

B,S , Calilornia Institute of Technology, 1954; M.S., University 

of Calilornia, Berkeley, 1963. Ph D , 1966 

Pelcovitz. Michael D., Assistant Professor, Economics 

BA, University of Rochester. 1972. PhD, Massachusetts 

Institute of Technology, 1976 

Pelczar, Michael J., Jr., Professor of Microbiology and Vice 

President for Graduate Studies and Research 

as . University of Maryland. 1936: M.S.. 1938; Ph.D. University 

of Iowa. 1941 

Pemberton, Etizabeth G., Associate Professor of Art 

B A. Ml Holyoke College. 1961; M.A-. Columbia University. 

1964. PhD . 1968 

Penner, Merrilynn J., Associate Professor. Psychology 

8 A . Harvard University, 1966, Ph D . University of Calilomia 

(San Diego). 1970 

Pennington, Kenneth D., Associate Professor of Music 

A B.. Friends University. 1950; B Mus.. 1950; MA. New York 

University. 1953. D Mus . Indiana University. 1961 

Perinbam, B., Marie, Assistant Professor of History 

B-A . London University. 1954, MA., University of Toronto, 1959. 

Ph D,. Georgetown University. 1969. 

Perkins, Hugh V., Professor and Acting Chairman. Institute 
For Child Study 

A-B.. Oberlin College. 1941 ; AM . University of Chicago. 1946; 
Ph D , 1949. Ed D . New York University. 1956 

Perkins, Moreland, Professor of Philosophy 

AS. Harvard University. 1948; AM. 1949. Ph D . 1953. 

Peroff, Kathleen, Assistant Professor of Government and Poli- 
tics 

B.A,. Holy Names College. 1965; Diplome Annuel. Sortxinne. 
1968; MA.. University of Wisconsin. Madison, 1970; Ph.D.. 
1975- 

Perrin, Donald G., Professor, Administration. Supervision and 

Curriculum 

B A . University of Southern California, 1960; M.A.. 1962, PhD , 

1969 

Peters, Robert M., Associate Professor ot Secondary Education 
B.S . Mankato Stale College, 1955. MS,. 1958; Ph.D.. University 
of Minnesola. 1965 

Peterson, William S., Professor of English 

B A . Walla Walla College. 1961. M.A.. University of Wisconsin. 

1962. Ph D . Northwestern University. 1968 

Petrick, Michael J., Associate Professor ot Journalism 
B.S.. University of Wisconsin. 1965; M S . 1967; Ph.D.. 1970. 

Pfaffent)erger, Roger C, Associate Professor and Director of 
Doctoral Program of Business and Management 
B S . California Polytechnic State University. 1965. M.S., Texas 
A and M University, 1968; PhD , 1971 

Pfister, Guenter G., Associate Professor ot German and Sec- 
ondary Education 

B.S , Bowling Green State University, 1963; M.A., Michigan 
State University. 1965; Ph D . University ot Kansas, 1970 

Phillips, Warren R., Professor of Government and Politics 
B.A.. Nonhwestern University. 1963; MA. San Francisco State 
University. 1965. PhD . University of Hawaii. 1969 

Pickard, Hugh B., Professor of Chemistry 

A-B . Haverlord College. 1933; Ph.D.. Nonhwestern University. 

1938 

Pierce, Sidney K., Jr., Associate Professor of Zoology 
B-Ed-. University of Miami. 1 966; Ph D., Flonda State University. 
1970. 

Piper, Don C, Professor ot Government and Politics 
B-A .University ot Maryland, 1954;M.A-. 1958; PhD. Duke Uni- 
versity. 1961- 

Plper, Harry W., Associate Professor of Civil Engineering 
B Arch E . Catholic University of America, 1940; MCE , 1961. 

Plrages, Dennis Clark, Associate Professor of Government and 

Politics 

B A . State University of Iowa. 1964; Ph.D.. Stanford University. 

1969 

Plischke, Elmer, Professor of Government and Politics 

Ph B . Marquette University. 1937; M.A,. American University. 

1938. Ph D . Clark University, 1943. 

Ptotkln, Allen, Associate Professor of Aerospace Engineering 
B S , Columbia University, 1963; MS. 1964; Ph.D.. Stanford 
University. 1968 

Poffenberger, Paut R., Associate Dean. College of Agriculture, 
Acting Chairman, Agricultural and Extension Education, and 
Professor. Agricultural and Resource Economics 
B.S . University of Maryland. 1935.MS. 1937. Ph.D. American 
University. 1953. 

Polst, Richard F., Jr., Associate Professor of Business and 
Management and Director of the MBA Program 
B.S.. Pennsylvania State University. 1965. MBA., University of 
Maryland, 1967. Ph D . Pennsylvania State University. 1971. 

Ponnamperuma. Cyril, Professor of Chemistry 
B A . University of Madras, 1948, B Sc, Birkbeck College. Uni- 
versity of London. 1959. Ph D . University of California. Berke- 
ley. 1962 



Poplal, BIna B., Assistant Professor. Food. Nutrition and Insti- 
tution Administration 

B-A.. Punjab University (India). 1949. MS. Baroda University 
(India). 1966. Ph D . Texas Women s University. 1971 

Portz, John, Associate Professor of English and Director of 
Honors Program 

BA. Duke University. 1937. MA.. Harvard University, 1941; 
Ph.D., 1957 

Postbrlef, Samuel, Assistant Professor. Government and Pol- 
itics 

A-B-. City College of New York (Brooklyn College). 1969; M A . 
Indiana University. 1971. PhD. 1975 

Potter, Jane H., Associate Professor of Zoology 

B.S . University ot Chicago. 1942; M.S., 1948; PhD.. 1949. 

Prange, Gordon, Professor of History 

B-A-. University of Iowa. 1932. MA. 1934. Ph D . 1937 

Prange, Richard E., Professor of Physics 
MS-. University of Chicago. 1955, Ph.D.. 1958. 

Prather, Elizabeth S., Professor and Chairman of Food Nu- 
trition and Institution Administration 

B.S-. Auburn University, 1951; M.S., 1955, PhD.. Iowa Slate 
University. 1963. 

Piesser, Harriet, Professor. Sociology 

B.A., George Washington University. 1959, M.A.. University of 

North Carolina. 1962; PhD.. University of California (Berkeley). 

1969- 

Prlndle, Allen M., Assistant Professor of Agncultural and Re- 
source Economics 

BS. Wisconsin Stale University. 1969; MS, Purdue University. 
1972; Ph D . Pennsylvania State University. 1977. 

Pugh, Howel G., Professor of Physics 

B-A. Cambridge University. 1955; MA. 1961; Ph.D.. 1961. 

Pugllese, Rudolph E., Professor of Speech and Dramatic Art 
B-A.. Miami University. 1947. MFA.. Catholic University of 
America. 1949; PhD . Ohio State University. 1961. 

Pugsley, James H., Associate Professor of Electncal Engineer- 
ing 

B-A-. Oberlin College. 1956; MS. University of Illinois, 1958. 
PhD-. 1963- 

Pumroy, Donald K., Professor of Counseling and Personnel 
Services and Psychology 

B.A., University of Iowa, 1949, M.S.. University of Wisconsin, 
1951 , PhD . University of Washington. 1954 

Punch, Jerry L., Research Professor of Heanng and Speech 

Sciences 

B-A-. Wake Forest College. 1965. MS. Vanderbilt University. 

1967; Ph D . Northwestern University, 1972 

Rado, George T., Professor of Physics 
S.B., Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 1939; SM . 1941 ; 
Ph.D., 1943- 

Ragan, Robert M., Professor of Civil Engineenng 
B S . Virginia Military Institute. 1955; MS . Massachusetts Insti- 
tute of Technology. 1959. Ph D-. Cornell University. 1965. 

Ranald, Ralph A., Associate Professor of Government and Poll- lion 



Regan, Thomas M., Professor of Chemical Engineering 
B-S . Tulane University, 1963; PhD , 1967- 

Reichelderfer, Charles F., Associate Professor of Entomology 
B S , St Cloud College. 1961 ; MA . University of Washington. 
1963; PhD-. University ot California al Riverside. 1968. 

Reid, James, Assistant Professor of Art 

B F A , Maryland Institute College of Art. 1966. MA, University 

of Maryland. 1970 

Relnhart, Bruce L., Professor of Mathematics 

BA.. Lehigh University. 1952; M.A., Princeton University. 1954. 

Ph-0-. 1956- 

Relser, Martin P., Professor of Electncal Engineenng and Phys- 



B-A-, University of California. Los Angeles, 1952; MA.. 1954; 
MA., Pnnceton University. 1958. PhD . 1961. 

Rao, T.R., Associate Professor of Electrical Engineenng 
B.Sc. Government Arts College. 1952, Dll. So, Indiana Institute 
of Science. 1955. M S E-. University of Michigan, 1961 , Ph D , 
1964- 

Rappleye, Robert D., Associate Professor of Botany 
B-S , University of Maryland, 1941; M.S.. 1947; Ph.D.. 1949. 
Ray, Phillip B., Associate Professor of Counseling and Person- 
nel Services 

B-A., Antioch College, 1950; M.S., University ot Pennsylvania. 
1955. Ph-0 , University of Minnesota. 1962. 

Razar, Michael J., Assistant Professor of Mathematics 
A B-. Harvard University. 1965. PhD.. 1971- 

Reaka, Marjorle L., Assistant Professor ot Zoology 

B-A-. University of Kansas. 1965. MS.. 1967; PhD . University 

of California. Berkeley. 1975 

Rearick, William R., Professor of Art 

B.A.. New York University, 1953; M.A.. 1958; Ph.D.. Han/ard 

University. 1968 

Redlsh, Edward F., Associate Professor of Physics 

A-B.. Pnnceton University. 1963. PhD., Massachusetts Institute 

of Technology. 1968. 

Redman, Barbara J., Assistant Professor of Textiles and Con- 
sumer Economics 

B-A.. University of Kentucky. 1972; PhD.. Iowa State University. 
1976- 

Reeve, E. Wilklns, Professor of Chemistry 

B.S.. Drexel Institute of Technology. 1936. Ph.D.. University of 

Wisconsin. 1940 

Reeves, Mavis M., Associate Professor of Government and Pol- 
itics 

B A , West Virginia University. 1942; MA.. 1943. Ph.D., Universi- 
ty ot North Carolina. 1947. 



Reveal, James L., Associate Professor of Botany 

B-S . Utah Slate University. 1963; MS. 1965; PhD.. Brigham 

Young University. 1969. 

Reynolds, Charles W., Professor of Horticulture 

A-B. University of Alabama. 1941; B.S. Auburn University. 

1947. MS-. 1949; PhD-, University ot Maryland. 1954. 

Reynolds, Michael M., Professor, School ot Library and Infor- 
mation Services 

A B . Hunter College. 1950; MSL S . Columbia University. 
1952. MA . Amencan University. 1954. PhD.. University ot 
Michigan, 1964 

Rhee, Moon-Jhong, Associate Professor of Electrical Engi- 
neering 

8 S . Seoul National University. 1958. M S . 1960. Ph D . The 
Catholic University of America. 1970 

RheintMldt, WernerC, Research Professor Computer Science 
and Mathematics. Director. Applied Mathematics 
B-S-. University of Heidelberg. 1 949; MA. 1952; Ph.D.. Universi- 
ty of Freiburg. 1955 

Rhoads, David i.. Associate Professor of Counseling and Per- 
sonnel Services 

8-A-, Temple University. 1954; MA., 1958; EdD, University of 
Maryland, 1963- 

Rlccl, Frederick A., Assistant Professor of Secondary Education 
BS. Bryant College, 1964; Ed.M.. Boston University. 1965. 
Ed-D., 1972- 

Richard. Jean-Paul, Associate Professor of Physics 

8 es Arts, University Laval. 1956: B e S . I960- Doctoral de 

Specialite University ot Pans 1963 Doctrate es Sciences 1965 

RIdgway, Whitman H., Assistant Professor of History 

A-B . Kenyon College. 1963; MA.. San Francisco State College. 

1967. Ph D . University of Pennsylvania. 1973. 

Ridky, Rotwrt W., Assistant Professor of Secondary Education 
8 S . Slate University of New York at Cortland. 1966; MS. Syra- 
cuse University. 1970, PhD-, 1973- 

Relger, Charles Joseph, III, Assistant Professor ot Computer 

Science 

B S - Purdue University, 1970. Ph D . Stanford University. 1974 

Risinger, Robert, Professor and Chairman. Secondary Educa- 



8 S . Ball State University. 1940: MA. University of Chicago. 
1947 Ed D . University of Colorado. 1955 

Ritzer, George, Professor of Sociology 

B.A-. City College of New York. 1962: M.B.A.. University of 

Michigan, 1964. Ph.D., Cornell University. 1968. 

Ritzmann, Barbara J., Assistant Professor in Housing and Ap- 
plied Design 

8. A., Pennsylvania State University, 1945; M.F.A., George 
Washington University. 1966. 

Rlvello, Robert M., Professor of Aerospace Engineenng 
8 S-. University of Maryland. 1943; M.S.. 1948- 

Robeson, Franklin E., Assistant Professor of Business and 

Management 

B B A University of Cincinnati. 1968;M-B-A-. Indiana University. 

1970; D-B-A., 1972. 

Roberson, Bob S., Associate Professor and Acting Chairman 

of Microbiology 

8 A . University of North Carolina, 1951; PhD.. 1960 

Roberts, Merrill J., Professor of Business and Management 
B A . University of Minnesota. 1938; MB. A.. University of Chi- 
cago. 1939; Ph.D. 1951 

Rodenhuls, David R., Associate Professor of Meteorology 
B.S-. University of California. Berkeley. 1959; B.S . Pennsylvania 
Slate University. 1960. PhD.. University of Washington, 1967 

Roderick, Jessie A., Associate Professor, Early Childhood and 
Elementary Education 

8-S-. Wilkes College. 1956. M.A., Columbia University, 1957; 
Ed-D-. Temple University, 1967. 

Rogolsky, Saul, Associate Professor. Institute for Child Study 
B.A-, Harvard University. 1948; M.A.. University of Chicago. 
1953; Ed-D . Han/ard University, 1963. 

RolMnson, Carl L., Professor ot Chemistry 

B.S.. University of Michigan, 1933. Ph.D.. University of Illinois, 



40 / Graduate Faculty 



Roos, Phillip G., Prolessor ot Physics 

B A., Ohio Wesleyan University. 1960, Ph D . Massachusetts 

Institute o( Technology. 1964 

Rose, Harry J., Professor of Chemistry 

B.S.. St. Francis College. 1948, MS . University of Maryland 

1952 

Rose, WMMam K., Professor of Aslronomy 
A.B.. Columbia University, 1957; Ph D,. 1963 

Rosenberg, Morris, Professor of Sociology 

B.A.. Brooklyn College, 1946; MA,, Columbia University 1950 

Ph,D,. 1953. 

Rosenberg, Theodore J., Research Professor, Institute for 
Physical Science and Technology 

B.E.E,. City University of New York (City College), 1960, Ph D., 
University ot California (Berkeley). 1965. 

Rosenfeld. Azriel. Research Prolessor. Computer Science 
B.A . Yeshiva College. 1950. M A . Columbia University 1951 
PhD. 1957 

Rosentield, Leonora C, Professor of French and Italian 
B.A., Smith College. 1930; A.M.. Columbia University. 1931 
Ph.D., 1940. 

Roswell, Charles Alfred, Jr., Assistant Professor of Geography 
B.A.. The Johns Hopkins University. 1963. M.A., University of 
Maryland, 1969; Ph.D.. 1974. 

Roush, Marvin L., Associate Professor ot Nuclear Engineering 

and Physics 

B.Sc, Ottawa University, 1956; Ph.D., University of Maryland. 

1964 

Rovner, Phillip, Associate Professor of Spanish 

B.A.. George Washington University, 1948; M.A.. 1949, PhD . 

University of Maryland. 1958 

Rowan, Robert, III, Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

B.A.. Pomona College. 1968, M.A.. Harvard University 1970 

Ph.D., 1974. 

Rubin, Roger H., Associate Professor of Family and Com- 
munity Development 

B.A.. Brooklyn College of the City University of New Vori*. 
1965; MS., Pennsylvania Slate University, 1966. Ph D . 1970 

Ruchkin, Judith P., Assistant Prolessor of Secondary Education 
B.A.. Swanhmore College. 1956. MA. Yale University. 1957. 
Ed.D., Columbia University Teachers College, 1972. 

Ruderman, David B., Assistant Prolessor of History 

B.A., City College of New Yori<, 1966; M.A., Columbia University. 

1968; Ph D.. Hebrew University. Jerusalem, 1975. 

Rundeli, Walter, Jr., Professor of History 

B.S., University of Texas, 1951 ; M.A.. American University. 1955 

PhD , 1957 

Russell, Charles C, Assistant Professor of French and Italian 
B.A., Oberlin College. 1956; MA.. Bryn Mawr College. 1964. 
Ph.D., Harvard University, 1970 

Russell, John D., Prolessor of English 

A.B., Colgate University. 1961; MA.. University of Washington, 

1956; PhD . Rutgers University. 1959 

Rutherford, Charles S., Assistant Prolessor of English 
B.A., Carleton College. 1962; M.A.. Indiana University. 1966; 
Ph D . 1970. 

Sadowski, Robert P., Assistant Professor of Speech and Dra- 
matic Art 

B.A.. Michigan State University. 1968; M.S.. Syracuse University. 
1969; Ph.D.. University of Iowa. 1973 

Salamanca, Jack R., Professor of English 
Diploma, Royal Academy of Dramatic Art, 1952; Lie. Deg.. Uni- 
versity of London. 1953; Licentiate. Royal Academy of Music, 
1954 

Sallet, Dirse W., Professor ot Mechanical Engmeenng 

B.S,. George Washington University. 1961. M S . University of 

Kansas. 1963; Ph.D.. Technische Hochschule. Stuttgart. 1966 

Samet, Hanan, Assistant Professor of Computer Science 
B.S . University ol California al Los Angeles. 1970. M S . (Com- 
puter Science). Stanford University. 1974; MS . (Operations 
Research). 1975. Ph D.. 1975 

Sampugna, Joseph, Associate Professor ol Chemistry 

B.A., University of Connecticut, 1959. M A . 1962; Ph.D.. 1968. 

Santa Maria, D. Laine, Associate Professor of Physical Educa- 
tion 

B.A.. University of Pennsylvania. 1954. M Ed . Temple Universi- 
ty. 1962; Ed.D . University of Oregon. 1968 

Sather, Jerome O., Associate Prolessor ol Mathematics 
B.S.. University of Minnesota, 1957. MS . 1959. Ph D . 1963. 
Sayre, Clifford L., Jr., Associate Dean. College of Engmeenng. 
and Professor of Mechanical Engineering 
B.S. Duke University. 1947. MS . Stevens Institute ol Technolo- 
gy. 1950; PhD. University of Maryland. 1961 

Schaeffer, Harry G., Associate Professor of Aerospace Engi- 
neenng 

B.S.. University of Washington. 1958; M.S.. Arizona State Uni- 
versity. 1962; Ph.D.. Virgnia Polytechnic Institute. 1967. 

Schafer, James A., Associate Professor of Mathematics 
B.S . University of Rochester. 1961 ; Ph.D., University of Chica- 
go, 1965. 



Schafer, William D., Associate Professor ol Measurement 
and Statistics 

B A.. University of Rochester. 1964; M.A., 1965; Ed D . 1969 
Schales, Franklin D., Associate Professor of Horticulture 
B.S.. Louisiana State University. 1959. MS, Cornell University 
1962; PhD, 1963 

Scheiling, David R., Assistant Professor. Civil Engineering 
B S C E.. Lehigh University. 1961; M.S.M E . Drexel Institute of 
Technology. 1964; PhD . University ol Maryland, 1968 
Schiller, Bradley R., Assistant Prolessor of Economics 
B.A.. University of California. Berkeley. 1965. PhD . Havard 
University. 1969 

Schlaretzki, Walter E., Professor of Philosophy 

A.B . Monmouth College. 1941. A.M.. University of Illinois, 1942 

Ph D . Cornell University. 1948. 

Schieidt. Wolfgang M., Professor ol Zoology 
PhD . University of Vienna. 1951. 



B.A., Bernard College, 1951 , M.A.. Columbia University (Teach- 
ers College). Ed D . 1961 

Schmidt, Margaret N., Assistant Professor, Physical Education 
B S., University ol North Carolina, 1957; MA,. University ol Mich- 
igan. 1961 ; PhD . University of Maryland, 1972 

Schneider, Benjamin, Professor of Psychology 

B.A., Alfred University, 1960; MBA.. City University of New 

Yort<, 1962, Ph.D., University of Maryland, 1967. 

Schneider, David T., Associate Professor of Mathematics 
B.A., Oberlin College. 1959; Ph.D.. Massachusetts Institute ol 
Technology, 1964 

Schneier, Craig Eric, Assistant Prolessor of Business and Man- 
agement 

B.S.. Ohio State University. 1969; M.S., University ol Colorado 
1972, DBA.. 1975 

Schoenbaum, Samuel, Professor of English 

B.A . Brooklyn College. 1947; M.A., Columbia University. 1949 

PhD . 1953. 

Scholnick, Ellin K., Professor of Psychology 

B.A.. Vassar College. 1958; Ph.D.. University ol Rochester 

1963 

Schroeder, Wilburn C, Professor of Chemical Engineenng 
B.S , University ol Michigan, 1930; M.S.E.. 1931. Ph D., 1933 

Schuitze, Charles L., Professor of Economics 

B.A, Georgetown University. 1948; M.A., 1950; Ph.D.. University 

of Maryland. 1960 

Schumacher, Elisabeth, Assistant Professor of Eariy Child- 
hood and Elementary Education 

B S . Newark State College. 1942; M Ed . Pennsylvania State 
University. 1962. D Ed . 1965 

Schumacher, Thomas, Associate Professor of Music 

B.Mus . Manhattan School of Music. 1958; M.S.. Julliard School 

of Music. 1962 

Schweitzer, Howard Christopher, Research Associate Profes- 
sor. Hearing and Speech Sciences 

B.A.. Northern Illinois University. 1968; M.A., University ol Mary- 
land. 1971. Ph.D.. 1974. 

Scott, John S., Assistant Professor. Physics and Astronomy 
BS . Michigan Stale University. 1972; PhD., University of 
Arizona. 1975. 

Seefeidt, Carol A.. Associate Prolessor of Eariy Childhood and 
Elementary Education 

B.A.. University of Wisconsin. 1956; MA. University ol South 
Florida. 1968. Ph D,, Florida State University. 1971 

Segal, David R., Prolessor ot Sociology 

B A,. Harpur College. 1962. M.A.. University of Chicago. 1963. 

Ph D.. 1967. 

Segal, Mady Wechsier, Assistant Prolessor of Sociology 

B A . Queens College. City University ol New York. 1965. M A . 

University ol Chicago. 1967. PhD . 1973. 

Setbel, Ronald J., Assistant Professor ol Agncultural and Ex- 
tension Education 

B.S , University ol Illinois. Urbana. 1957; M.S.. 1958. PhD, Uni- 
versity ol Maryland. 1972 

Seidman, Eric, Associate Professor of Special Education 
B.S.. New York University, 1947; M.A., 1948; Ph.D.. University 
of Connecticut. 1964 

Seigel, Arnold E., Lecturer in Mechanical Engineering 
B.S.. University ol Maryland. 1944; MS . Massachusetts Insti- 
tute of Technology. 1947; Ph D . University ol Amsterdam. 1952 

Sengers, Jan V., Professor of Institute ot Physical Science and 

Technology 

Doctorandus. University of Amsterdam. 1955; Ph.D.. 1962 

Serwer, Howard J., Associate Professor of Music 

B.A.. Yale University. 1949; MBA., Columbia University, 1950. 

Ph.D.. Yale University. 1969 

Shaffner, Clyne S.. Professor ot Poultry Science 

B.S.. Michigan Slate University. 1 938; M.S.. 1 940; Ph.D.. Purdue 

University. 1947 

Shanks, James B., Prolessor ol Horticulture 

B.Sc. Ohio State University. 1939; M.Sc. 1946; Ph D . 1949 



Shapere, Dudley, Professor of Philosophy 

B.A . Harvard University. 1949; M.A., 1955. Ph.D., 1957. 

Sheaks, O. J., Associate Professor of Nuclear Engineenng 

and Chemical Engineering 

B.S . North Carolina Slate College. 1964, Ph.D.. 1969 

Shearer, Jane K., Professor and Chairman of Housing and 
Applied Design 

B S . University ol Tennessee. 1940; MS,. 1950. Ph D Flonda 
Stale University. 1960 

Shiflett, John M., Assistant Prolessor ol Child Sludy 

B.A . Santa Barbara City College. 1965. MA.. University of 

Calilornia. 1967. Ph D . 1972 

Shreeve, Charles A., Jr., Prolessor of Mechanical Engineering 
B E,, The Johns Hopkins University. 1935. M.S., University ol 
Maryland, 1943 

Shroyer, Charlotte A., Assistant Prolessor ol Special Educalron 
B.A . Ohio State University. 1961; M.Ed.. University of Pitts- 
burgh. 1972. PhD . 1975 

Sigall, Harold, Associate Prolessor of Psychology 

B S . City College ol New York, 1964, PhD . University of Texas 

(Austin). 1968 

Signeil, Karl L., Assistant Prolessor ol Music 

B S . Julliard School ol Music. 1962; M.A.. Columbia University. 

1963; PhD . University ol Washington. 1973. 

Sillo, Charles B., Jr., Associate Professor ot Electncal Engineer- 
ing 

BSEE.MSEE. University of Notre Dame. 1967. PhD,. 1970 
Silverman, Joseph, Prolessor ol Chemical Engmeenng 
B.A , Brooklyn College. 1944; A.M.. Columbia University 1948 
Ph.D.. 1951. 

Simms, Betty H., Professor of Special Education 
B.A.. Hams Teachers College, 1947. MA.. University ol Michi- 
gan. 1955. Ed D . University ol Maryland. 1962, 

Simons, David E., Associate Prolessor ol Electncal Engineenng 
BS. University ol Maryland. 1949. MS.. 1951 

Singer, Neil M., Associate Prolessor ol Economics 

B.A,. Harvard University. 1960; M.A.. Stanford University 1961 

PhD . 1965 

Sisier, Hugh D., Chairman and Professor of Botany 

B.S . University ot Maryland. 1949; MS. 1951. Ph D . 1953 

Skolnick, Leonard P.. Professor of Chemical Engineenng 
BS,. University ol Rochester. 1953. M S . New York University. 
1955, D.Sc Massachusetts Inslitule ol Technology. 1958. 
Skuja, Andris, Assistant Professor. Physics and Astronomy 
B S . University ol Toronto. 1966. Ph.D.. University of Calilomia 
(Berkeley). 1972 

Slawsky, Zaka I., Professor of Physics and Astronomy 
BS . Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. 1933. MS.. California 
Institute ol Technology. 1935; Ph.D.. University of Michigan 
1938, 

Slud, Eric V., Assistant Professor. Mathematics 

B A . Harvard University. 1972; PH D . Massacusetts Institute ol 

Technology. 1976 

Small, Eugene 8., Associate Professor of Zoology 
B.A . Wayne Slate University. 1953; MS . 1958; Ph D,. Uni- 
versity of California al Los Angeles. 1966 

Smith, Barry D., Associate Professor ol Psychology 
B S . Pennsylvania Slate University. 1962. M A . Bucknell Uni- 
versity. 1964. Ph D . University ol Massachusetts. 1967 

Smith, Betty F., Professor and Chaimian of Textiles and Con- 
sumer Economics 

B.S.. University of Ariiansas. 1951; M.S.. University of Tennes- 
see. 1956. Ph D . University of Minnesota. 1960; Ph.D.. 1965. 
Smith, Elbert 8., Professor of History 
A.B . Maryville College. 1940. A M. University ol Chicago 1947 
PhD.. 1949 

Smith, Eiske van Panhuys, Prolessor ol Aslronomy 
B.A . Han/ard University. 1950. MA . 1951; PhD. 1955. 

Smith, Gayle S., Associate Professor of English 

Ph.B . University ot Chicago. 1946; B S . Iowa State University. 

1948. MA . Cornell University, 1951; Ph D . 1958. 

Smith. Harold D., Associate Director ot Extension Education 
and Prolessor of Agricultural and Resource Economics 
B A , Bridgewater College, 1943, MS , University of Maryland, 
1947; Ph D , Amercan University, 1952 

Smith, Hilda L., Assistant Professor ot History 
B S . Southwest Missouri State University. 1963; MA,, Universi- 
ty ol Missouri, 1964, Ph D , University ol Cnicago, 1975 

Smith, Kenwyn K.. Assistant Professor. Psychology 

B A . University ol Queensland (Australia) 1965. 1967. M.A., 

1970, M.A., Yale University. 1973. Ph D . 1974 

Smith, Pamela Z., Assistant Prolessor ol Computer Science 
B A,, Cornell University, 1970; M.S., University of Wisconsin. 
1972; PhD,. 1976 

Smith, Paul, Associate Prolessor ol Mathematics 

B S . Drexel University. 1965. M S . Case Institute ol Technology 

1967. Ph D . Case Western Resen/e University, 1969 

Smith, Theodore G., Prolessor ol Chemical Engmeenng 
BE S , The Johns Hopkins University, 1956; ME S,, 1958; 
D Sc , Washington University, 1960 



Graduate Faculty / 41 



Snow. George A., Professor ot Physics 

B S . College o( Ihe City of New York, 1945. MA. Princeton 

University. 1947. Ph D , 1949 

Snower, Dennis J., Assistant Professor of Economics 

B A,. Oxford University, M.A.. 1971, M.A.. Pnnceton University, 

1973; Ph.D.. 1975 

Soares, Jr., Josepfi H., Associate Professor of Poultry Science 

B S , University ot Maryland, 1964; MS.. 1966. PH.D , 1968. 

Soergel, Oagobert. Associate Professor, College of Library and 

Infomiation Services 

8.8 , University of Freiburg, 1960; MS, 1964; Pti.D.. 1970. 

Solomos. Theopfianes, Assistant Professor of Horticulture 
MA.. College of Agnculture. Attiens. Greece, 1957; Pfi.D,, Uni- 
versity ot Cambndge, 1962 

Sommer, Sheldon E., Associate Professor of Chemistry 
B S., City College of New York. 1959. MA, City University of 
New York. 1961; MS. Texas ASM University. 1964. Ph.D.. 
Pennsylvania State University, 1969 

SosnowskJ. Saul. Professor ot Spanish 

A-B., University of Scranton, 1967; MA,. University ot Virginia, 

1968, PhD , 1970, 

Spain. Ian L., Professor of Chemical Engineenng and Director 

of Engineenng Malenals 

B.S., Imperial College of Science, 1961 , PhD. 1964 

Spangler. Paul J., Lecturer in Entomology 

A.B . Lebanon Valley College. 1949. MS.. Ohio University. 1951 . 

Ph D . University of Missouri, 1960 

Sparks, David S., Professor of History and Dean lor Graduate 

Studies 

A.B., Grinnell College. 1944; AM . University of Chicago. 1945. 

PhD . 1951 

Specter, Gerald, Assistant Professor of Psychology 

B A , Harvard University, 1966; Ph D., University of Rochester, 

1971, 

Spiegel, Gabrielle, Assistant Professor of History 

BA. Bryn Mawr College, 1964; M A.T , Harvard University. 

1965, M A , Die Johns Hopkins University. 1969; Ph D . 1974 

Spiro, Marie, Assistant Professor. Art 

B A.. Wilson College. 1957, MS . New York University. 1961 

Spivak, Steven M., Associate Professor of Textiles and Con- 
sumer Economics 

B.S,. Philadelphia College of Textiles and Sciences, 1963; MS , 
Georgia Institute of Technology. 1965; PhD . University of Man- 
chester, 1967. 

Splaine, John E., Assistant Professor of Administration, Super- 
vision and Curriculum 

B-A-, University of New Hampshire, 1963; MA., 1965; Ed,D . 
Boston University. 1973. 

Stadtman, Earl R., Lecturer in Microbiology 

B S . University ot California. Berkeley, 1942, PhD . 1949 

Staley, Stuart W., Professor of Chemistry 

B.A.. Williams College. 1959; M.S., Yale Universit, 1961 ; PhD , 

1963 

Stark, Francis C, Jr., Professor of Horticulture and Provost. 
Division ot Agncultural and Life Sciences 
B.S., Oklahoma A&M College. 1940; MS,, University ot Mary- 
land. 1941. PhD., 1948 

Starkweattier, Kendall N., Assistant Professor of Industnal 

Education 

B.S.. Western Illinois University. 1967; M.A.. Eastern Michigan 

University. 1969; Ph D , University of Maryland. 1975. 

Statom, Jodetlano Johnson, Assistant Professor of Administra- 
tion. Supen/ision and Curriculum 

B.S.. Miner Teachers College. 1954. M Ed.. University ot Mary- 
land. 1968. AGS.. 1968; Ed.D.. 1972 

Steel, Donald H., Professor of Physical Education 

B.A.. Trenton State College. 1955. M A.. University of Maryland, 

1957; Ph D . Louisiana State University. 1964 

Steele, Robert E., Assistant Professor of Psychology 
B.A.. Morehouse College. 1965. M Div , Episcopal Theological 
Scool. 1968; M P H Yale University School of Medicine. 1971 . 
M.S.. Yale University. 1974, Ph D., 1975 

Steinberg, Phillip H.. Prolessor ol Physics 

B S University ot Cincinnati 1954 PhD Nonhwestern 

University 1960 

Steinberg, Richard I., Assistant Professor of Physics 

BA,. Swanhmore College. 1963 Ph D.. Yale University. 1969 

Stellmacher, Karl L., Professor of Mathematics 
M.D . University of Goettingen. 1933; Ph.D.. 1936 

Stephens, E. Robert, Professor and Chairman of Administra- 
tion, Supervision, and Curnculum 

B.S.. Momingside College, 1952. M.S.. Drake University. 1958. 
Ph.D.. University ot Iowa. 1966 

Steinhauer, Allen L, Professor and Chairman of Entomokigy 
B.S.. University of Manitoba. 1953; M.S.. Oregon State College, 
1955, Ph D , 1958 

Stelnman, Robert M., Professor of Psychology 

D.D S , St Louis University. 1968; M.A.. New School lor Social 

Research, 1962; Ph.D. 1964 

42 / Graduate Faculty 



stern, Guy, Professor and Chairman of German and Slavic 
Languages and Literature 

BA . Hofstra College, 1948, MA, Columbia University, 
1950; Ph. D, 1953 

Stern, Herbert J.. Associate Professor of Counseling and Per- 
sonnel Services 

B.S.. The Johns Hopkins University, 1950. M.Ed.. 1953, Ed D . 
University ol Maryland, 1962 
Stern, Lawrence. Assistant Prolessor ol Philosophy 
B A , Rutgers, 1958, M A , Havard, 1962, Ph D , 1968 

Stern, William L., Professor of Botany 

B S , Rutgers University. 1950; MS., University ot Illinois, 1951 , 

PhD . 1954 

Sternberg, Yaron M.. Professor of Civil Engineenng 

B S University of Illinois. 1961. MS . University of Calilorma 

at Davis. 1963. PhD. 1965 

Sternheim. Charles E., Associate Professor of Psychology 

B S , Brooklyn College, 1961, Ph D , University of Rochester, 

1967 

Stevens, George A.. Professor ot Agncultural and Resource 

Economics 

BS. Virgnia Polytechnic Institute. 1941. PhD, University ol 

Maryland, 1957 

Stevenson. John C. Assistant Prolessor of Botany 
B S . Brooklyn College. 1966; Ph D . University of North Caroli- 
na. 1972 

Stewart, G. W., Professor of Computer Science 
A B , University of Tennessee, 1962, Ph D , 1968 

Stewart. James M.. Professor of Chemistry 

B A Western Washington College, 1953, Ph D , University of 

Washington, 1958 

Stewart, Kent K.. Adjunct Professor in Food, Nutntion and Ins- 
titution Administration 

BA, University ol California. Berkeley, 1956, PhD. Florida 
Slate University. 1965 

Stone, Clarence N., Associate Professor of Government and 
Politics, and Director, Urban Research Group, Bureau of Gov- 
ernmental Research 

A B , University of South Carolina, 1957; M.A., Duke University 
1960. Ph D , 1963 

Stone, Stephen E., Assistant Professor of Health Education 
B S , Lock Haven State College. 1962. M Ed . East Stroudsburg 
State College. 1969. Ph D,. Texas A&M University, 1973 

Stough, Kenneth F., Associate Professor of Industnal Educa- 
tion 

B S , Millersville Stale College, 1954, M Ed , Pennsylvania Slate 
University, 1961 , Ph D . University ol Maryland, 1968 

Slowasser, Karl. Associate Professor of History 
Ph D , University of Muensler, 1966 

Strand, Ivar E., Jr., Assistant Professor of Agricultural and 
Resource Economics 

B A , University ol Rochester, 1967: MA , University of Rhode 
Island, 1971, Ph D , 1975 

Straszheim, Mahlon R., Professor of Economics 

B S . Purdue University. 1961 , PhD , Havard University. 1965 

Strauss, Aaron S., Prolessor of Mathematics 

e S , Case Institute ol Technology. 1961, MS , University ot 

Wisconsin, 1962, PhD , 1964 



Stritfler, Charles D., Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineer- 
ing 
BSE., University ol Michigan. 1961; MS E.. 1963; Ph.D.. 1972 

Strobell, Adah P., Associate Professor of Recreation 

A.B.. San Francisco State College. 1953; M S . University ol 

California. Los Angeles. 1958. Ph D . University of Illinois. 1966 

Strouse, James C, Assistant Prolessor of Government and Pol- 
itics 

B A.. University of Maryland. 1966; M.A.. 1967. Ph.D.. University 
of North Carolina, 1970. 

Stunkard. Clayton L., Professor and Acting Chairman of 
Measurement and Statistics 
B S . University of Minnesota. 1948. M.A.. 1951; PhD , 1959 

Stuntz, Calvin F., Professor of Chemistry 
B A , University ot Buttalo, 1939; Ph D , 1947 

Sublett, Henry L., Professor and Chairman ol Early Childhood 
Elementary Education 

A.B., Duke University, 1951 , M Ed., University ol Virginia. 1953. 
Ed D . 1959 

Sucher, Joseph, Professor ot Physics and Astronomy 

B S . Brooklyn College. 1952. Ph D . Columbia University. 1958 

Sullivan, Dorothy D., Associate Professor. Eariy Childhood and 

Elementary Education 

A B , University of Maryland. 1945; Ed M.. 1960; Ed.D . 1965 

Sunal, Dennis W., Assistant Professor of Eariy Childhood-Ele- 
mentary Education 
B S . University of Michigan, 1964; M A., 1970: Ph D , 1973 

Suppe, Frederick R., Associate Prolessor of Philosophy 
A.B . University ol California. Riverside. 1962. AM., University 
of Michigan. 1964; Ph.D.. 1967 



Svenonius, Lars S., Professor of Philosophy 

Fil. Kand . Uppsala University, 1950, Fil Mag , 1955, Fil. Lie , 

1955, Fil Dr. 1960 

Svoboda, Cyril P.. Assistant Professor of Human Development 

Education 

BA , St Columbans Maior Seminary. 1954. BTh.. 1958; B.Ph . 

Gregonan University (Rome, Italy), 1959. LPh.. 1960; PhD . 

1961 , Ph D , University of Wisconsin, 1973 

Sweet, Daniel, Associate Professor of Mathematics 
B S , Fairleigh Dickinson University, 1965, Ph.D., Brown Univer- 
sity, 1969 

Syski, Ryszard, Professor ot Mathematics 

B S . University ol London, 1954, Ph D . Chelsea College, 1960 

Taff, Charles A., Professor of Business and Management 

B S . University of Iowa, 1937; MA., 1941; Ph D.. University ol 

Maryland, 1952 

Talaat, Mostafa E., Professor of Mechanical Engineenng 

B S , University of Cairo, 1946; M.S., University of Pennsylvania, 

1947. PhD 1951 

Tanney, Mary Faith. Assistant Professor of Psychology 

B A , Pennsylvania State University. 1 968; MA . Ohio State 

University. 1971: Ph. D . 1972 

Tarica, Ralph. Associate Professor of French and Italian 
B A . Emory University, 1954: MA,, 1958; Ph D . Harvard Uni- 
versity, 1966 

Taylor, Corwin H.. Professor of Secondary Education and Mu- 

B.Mus Ed , College of Music of Cincinnati. 1930; M.Mus.. 1933. 
B S . University of Cincinnati. 1932; Ed M , 1935; Ed D . 1941 

Taylor, Dalmas A., Professor of Psychology 
B S . Western Reserve University, 1959; M S , Howard Universi- 
ty, 1961, PhD , University of Delaware, 1965 

Taylor, Leonard S., Professor of Electncal Engineenng 
A B , Harvard University. 1951 , MS, New Mexico State Univer- 
sity, 1956, Ph.D.. 1960. 

Taylor. Martin Edward, Assistant Professor of Business and 

Management 

B Comm . The University of Cape Town. South Afnca. 1966. 

MBA, University of Texas, Austin. 1970. PhD . 1974 

Teitelbaum, Herman I.. Associate Professor ot Psychology 
A B . The Johns Hopkins University, 1957. MS., University ol 
Washington, 1959. Ph . McGill University. 1962. 

Tennyson, Ray A., Associate Professor of Cnminology 

BS. Washington State University. 1951; M.A.. 1957; Ph.D.. 

1965 

Terchek, Ronald J., Associate Professor of Government and 

Politics 

BA . University ol Chicago. 1958; MA.. 1960; Ph.D.. University 

of Maryland, 1965 

Therrien, Madeleine B.. Professor and Chairman. French and 

Italian 

Cert University ol Fneburg (Switzertand). 1952; Cert University 

of Athens (Greece). 1956; Lie , University ot Pans (France). 

1959, Ph D . Michigan State University, 1966 

Thieblot, Armand J., Jr., Associate Prolessor of Business and 
Management 

B S , Pnnceton University, 1961 , MBA University ol Pennsyl- 
vania, 1965; Ph D . 1969 

Thomas, Owen Pestell, Professor and Chairman. Poultry Sa- 
ence 

B.Sc . University of Natal. 1954. M.Sc . 1962; Ph.D.. University 
of Maryland, 1966 

Thomas. William L, Assistant Professor of Counseling and 
Personnel Services. Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs 
B S . The University ol Tennessee, Knoxville. 1955. M S . 1965, 
Ph D , Michigan Stale University, 1970 
Thompson, Arthur H., Professor of Horticulture 
B.S., IJniversity of Minnesota; 1941; Ph.D.. University of Mary- 
land, 1945 

Thompson, Derek, Associate Professor of Geography 

B A , Manchester University. 1960. M.A.. 1962; Ph.D.. Indiana 
University. 1969 

Thompson, Harvey W., Assistant Professor of Speech and 
Dramatic Art 

B.S.. Wayne Stale University, 1966; M.F A . Columbia Univers- 
ity, 1972 

Thompson, James Clinton, Jr., Assistant Professor of Recrea- 
tion 

B.A.. Mississippi State University. 1967; M.S., Colorado State 
University. 1970; PhD , 1974 

Thompson. Owen E.. Associate Professor of Meteroiogy 
BS . University ol Missoun, 1961. MS 1963; Ph D , 1966 

TTiorberg, Raymond, Associate Professor of English 

B A , University ot Alaska, 1939, M A . University ot Chicago, 

1946, Ph D , Cornell University, 1954 

Thorn. Colin Edward. Assistant Professor of Geography 
BA . University of Nottingham. 1967, M Sc, McGili University. 
1970. Ph D . University of Colorado, Boulder. 1974 

Ttdman, Derek A.. Research Professor. Institute for Fluid Dy- 
namics and Applied Mathematics 
B Sc, London University. 1952 Ph D , 1956 



TIerney, WIMIam F., Associate Professor of Industrial Education 
B S,. Central Connecticut State College. 1941 , Iwl S , Ohio Slate 
University, 1949; Ed D . University of Ivlaryland. 1952 

Tint, Margaret A., Associate Professor of Healtti Education 
B.S,. Otiio State University. 1946; MA. Columbia University. 
1948. Ed D . West Virginia University. 1969 

Tossell, John L., Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

B.S.. University of Chicago. 1966. MA.. Harvard University, 

1967; Ph.D.. 1972. 

Traver, Paul, Professor ol Music 

B.MuS-, Catholic University ol America, 1955; M.Mus.. 1957; 

DMA.. Stanlord University. 1967 

Travis, Irene Lathrop, Assistant Professor. College of Library 
and Information Services 

B.A.. Mills College. 1962; M.L.S., University ol California, 1966; 
Ph.D , 1974 

Tretler, Steven A., Associate Professor of Electrical Engineer- 



Trimble, VIrgnIa L.. Assistant Professor of Astronomy 
B,A.. University of California, Los Angeles, 1964. MS. Califor- 
nia Institute of Technology. 1965; Ph D . 1968; M.A.. University 
of Cambridge (England). 1969. 

Trlvelpiece, Alvin W., Professor of Physics 
B.S,. California Stale Polytechnic College. 1953; M S . Califor- 
nia Institute of Technology. 1955. Ph D . 1958 

Troth, Eugene W., Professor and Chairman of Music 
DePaul University, 1947; MM, Ullinois Wesleyan University. 
1950; Ph D.. University of Michigan. 1958 

Trousdale, Marlon S., Assistant Professor. English 

B A,. University of Michigan, 1951 , MA,, University of California 

(Berkeley), 1955, Ph D , University of London (England), 1975. 

Trout, Oavid L., Adjunct Professor, Food. Nutntion and Institu- 
tion Administration 

B.A . Swarthmore College. 1951. M.A.. Duke University. 1954; 
PhD . 1958, 

True, Nellta, Associate Professor ol Music 
B M . University of Michigan. 1958; MM. 1960 

Tsui, Chung Y., Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering 
M.E.. Hong Kong Technical College, 1953; M.S.. Purdue Univer- 
sity. 1959; Ph.D. 1967 

Tuthill, Dean F., Professor of Agricultural and Resource Eco- 
nomics 

B.S . Cornell Universit. 1949; M.S.. University of Illinois, 1954, 
PhD , 1958 

Twigg, Bernard A., Professor and Chairman of Horliculture 
B.S , University ol Maryland, 1952; ful.S,. 1965; Ph.D.. 1959 

Tyler, Bonnie B., Associate Professor. Institute for Child Study 
B A . DePauw. 1948; MA,, Ohio State University, 1949, Ph D , 
1954 

Tyler, Forrest B., Professor of Psychology 

B.A.. Depauw University. 1948. M.A.. Ohio State University. 

1950; Ph.D. 1952 

Tyler, Robert W., Assistant Professor of Physical Education 
A.B . Drury College. 1957; M.S'. Pennsylvania State University. 
1960. PhD . 1969 

Ulmer, Melvifle J., Professor of Economics 

B S , New York University, 1937; MA. 1938; Ph D . Columbia 

University. 1948, 

Undersander, Daniel J., Assistant Professor of Agronomy 
BS . University of Minnesota. 1972; M.S., Purdue University, 
1974, PhD , 1975 

Usianer, Eric M., Assistant Professor of Government and Poli- 



Vaccaro, Paul, Assistant Professor, Secondary Education and 
Physical Education 

B.S., University of Massachusetts, 1970; M,S-. University of 
Florida. 1973. 

Vandergoot, David, Assistant Professor of Counseling and 
Personnel Services 

B.A . Calvin College. 1969, M.A.. Michigan State University. 
1972. Ph.D. 1975 

Vandergraft, James S., Associate Professor of Computer Sci- 
ence 

B.S.. Stanford University. 1959; MS.. 1963; Ph.D.. University of 
Maryland. 1966 

Vandersall. John H., Professor of Dairy Science 

B.S,. Ohio State University. 1950. MS . 1954. PhD . 1959 

Vanderslice, Joseph T., Professor of Chemistry 

B.S., Boston College, 1949; Ph,D., Massachusetts Institute of 

Technology, 1952. 

Vander Velden, Lee R., Assistant Professor of Physical Educa- 
tion 
B.S. University of Wisconsin. 1961. Ph.D. 1971 

Van Egmond, Peter, Assistant Professor of English 

B.A . Mississippi College, 1959; M.A,, University of Mississippi. 

1961; Ph.D.. University of North Carolina. 1966. 



Van Valkenburg, Shirley 0,, Assistant Professor of Botany 
B A,. Washington State University. 1948; M.S.. University of 
Washington. 1968; Ph D . 1970 



Vannoy, Donald Wayne, Assistant Professor of Civil Engineer- ^ggQ 



Wasserman, Paul, Professor. College of Library and Informa- 
tion Services 

B B.A . City College ol New York. 1948; M SL.S.. Columbia 
University. 1949; MS , 1950; Ph.D.. University of Michigan. 



ing 

BS.. West Virginia institute of Technology, 1970. M.E.. Univer- 
sity ol Virginia, 1971; Ph.D., 1975. 

Vaughn, III, Charles Henry, Associate Professor of Speech and 

Dramatic Art 

B S . Edinboro State College. 1961 ; IvI.A., University of Denver. 

1962. 

Vermel], Geerat Jacobus, Associate Protessor of Zoology 
A.B . Princeton University, 1968; Ph.M., Yale University. 1970. 
Ph D . 1971 

Vernekar, Anandu D., Associate Professor of Meteorology 
B S . University of Pennsylvania. 1955. B S . 1956; MS . 1959. 
M.S.. University of Michigan. 1963. PhD . 1966 

Vesentfni, Edoardo, Professor of Mathematics 

Laurea in scienzse matematiche. Universita di Milano. 1950; 

Libera docenza in geometra. Universita di Roma. 1956. 

Via, James E., Associate Protessor of Agricultural and Re- 
source Economics 

B S , North Carolina State University at Raleigh, 1952; MS., 
1964; PhD , 1967, 

Vijay, Inder K., Assistant Professor of Dairy Science 
BS,, Puniab University, India. 1961. MS. University of Sas- 
katchewan. 1966; PhD . University of Calilornia. Davis. 1971 

Viola, Victor E., Jr., Prolessor ol Chemistry 

A.B.. University ol Kansas. 1957, Ph,D,, University of California 

at Berkeley. 1961. 

Vitzthum, Richard C, Associate Professor of English 

B.A.. Amherst College. 1957. MAT. Harvard University. 1958; 

PhD , Stanlord University, 1963, 

Vlach, John M., Assistant Prolessor, English 
A.B.. University ol California (Davis). 1970; M.A.. Indiana Uni- 
versity. 1972. PhD . 1975. 

Voli, Mary J., Associate Professor of Microbiology 

B A,. Mt St, Agnes College. 1955. M.S.. The Johns Hopkins 

University. 1961. Ph.D . University of Pennsylvania. 1964 

Wachhaus, Gustav E., Assistant Protessor. Music 
B S.. West Chester State College. 1957, MA., Columbia Uni- 
versity, 1966, EdD , 1973 

Wagner, Thomas C. G., Prolessor ol Electrical Engineering 
B S . Harvard University, 1937; M.A., University ol Maryland. 
1939; PhD. 1943. 

Wakefield, John, Associate Professor of Music 
B M . University ol Michigan. 1963; MM.. 1964 

Waldner, llmar. Assistant Professor of Philosophy 

8 S . University of Illinois. 1961. Ph D . Stanlord University. 

1969 

Waldrop, Rot>ert S., Prolessor ol Psychology 
B.A., University of Oklahoma, 1934; PhD., University of Michi- 
gan, 1948 

Wall, N. Sanders, Professor of Physics and Astronomy 
B S , Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 1949; Ph.D,, Massachu- 
setts Institute of Technology. 1954. 

Wallace, James M., Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engi- 
neering 

BCE. Georgia Institute of Technology. 1962. MS. 1964; Ph D . 
University ol Oxford. 1969. 

Wallace, Stephen J., Assistant Professor ol Physics 

B S Eng . Case Institute ol Technology, 1961, MS. University 

of Washington. 1969. PhD . 1971, 

Walston, William H., Jr., Associate Professor of Mechanical 

Engineering 

B-M E . University of Delaware. 1959. M M E . 1961. Ph D . 

1964 

Walters, William B., Associate Professor of Chemistry 

B S . Kansas State University. 1960; Ph.D., University ol Illinois. 

1964 

Ward, Charles D., Associate Prolessor ol Psychology 

B.A.. Pomona College, 1958; M.A., University of North Carolina, 

1962; PhD. 1963. 

Warner, Charles R., Associate Professor of Mathematics and 

Statistics 

A 8 , George Washington University. 1935. MA. 1936, Ph D , 

1947 

Warner, Charles R., Associate Prolessor of Mathematics and 

Statistics 

B,A,, University ol Toronto. 1955; M.S.. University of Rochester. 

1957. PhD . 1962. 

Warren, J., Benedict, Associate Professor of History 

8 A-. Duns Scotus College. 1953; MA,, University of Mexico. 

1960. PhD. 1963 

Washburn, Wilcomb, Adjunct Prolessor ol Amencan Studies 
A B.. Dartmouth College. 1948: Ph.D.. Harvard University. 
1955 



Weaver, V. Phillips, Prolessor. Early Childhood and Elementary 

Education 

A.B.. College of William and Mary. 1951 ; M.Ed . Pennsylvania 

State University. 1956. D Ed . 1962 

Weber, Joseph, Professor of Physics 

BS , U S, Naval Academy, 1940; PhD,. Catholic University of 

Amenca. 1951 

Wedding, Presley A., Associate Professor of Civil Engineering 
B S . University of Maryland. 1937; MS . 1952 

Weiner, Ronald M. Associate Prolessor ol Microbiology 
B.S. Brooklyn College. 1964; MS . Long Island University 
1967; Ph D . Iowa State University. 1970 

Weinstein, Paul A., Associate Professor of Economics 
B.A-. William and Mary College. 1954. MA . Northwestern Uni- 
versity. 1958. Ph D . 1961 

Weiss, Gene S., Associate Prolessor of Speech and Dramatic 

Art 

B-A.. Brandeis University, 1961. MA,, New York University. 

1965; Ph D , Ohio State University, 1970 

Weiss, Leonard, Professor ol Electrical Engineenng and Insti- 
tute of Physical Science and Technology 
BS.. City University of New York. 1956. M S . Columbia Univer- 
sity. 1959, Ph D , The Johns Hopkins University. 1962 

Weiss, Randall D., Assistant Prolessor of Economics 

B.A. Harvard College. 1968; MA,. Han/ard University. 1971; 

PhD,. 1973. 

Wellisch, Hans, Associate Prolessor. College ol Library and In- 
formation Services 
MLS. University of Maryland. 1972; Ph.D.. 1975. 

Wentzel, Oonat G., Prolessor of Astronomy 

B.A,, University ol Chicago. 1954; BS,, 1955; MS,, 1956; PhD., 

1960. 

Werbos. Paul John, Assistant Protessor of Government and 
Politics 

B.A., Han/ard University. 1967; M.Sc, London School ol Eco- 
nomics. 1968, S.M.. Harvard University, 1969; Ph.D.. 1974. 

West, Robert C, Assistant Prolessor ol Economics 
B.A., University of Missouri. 1969; Ph D., Northwestern Universi- 
ty, 1973 

Westbrook, Franklin, Assistant Professor of Counseling and 
Personnel Services; and Counselor. Counseling Center 
B.S . Chicago State University. 1 961 ; MS . City College ol New 
York. 1964. Ed D . Indiana University. 1971 

Westerhout, Gart, Professor ol Astronomy 

8.S . University of Leiden, 1950: M.S.. 1954; Ph.D.. 1958. 

Westhoff, Dennis C, Associate Professor of Dairy Science 
B.S . University of Georgia. 1966. M.S.. North Carolina State 
University. 1968. Ph.D . 1970. 

Westhoff, Dennis C, Associate Professor of Dairy Science 
BS . University of Georgia. 1966; MS . North Carolina Stale 
Universit. 1968; Ph D . 1970 

Whaples, Gene C, Assistant Professor of Agriculture and Ex- 
tension Education 

B S . University of Connecticut. 1960; M.S , Kansas State Uni- 
versity, 1965, PhD . University of Maryland. 1974 

Wheatley, John Hunter, Assistant Professor of Agricultural and 
Extension Education and Secondary Education 
B.A , Duke University, 1963, MAT, 1965, Ph D,. Ohio Stale 
University. 1972 

Wheaton, Frederick W., Associate Professor of Agricultural 

Engineering 

B S . Michigan State University, 1964; M.S.. 1965: Ph.D.. Iowa 

State University. 1968 

Wheelock, Arthur K., Jr., Assistant Prolessor Part-time. Art 
B.A.. Williams College. 1965. Ph D . Harvard University. 1973. 

White, Gregory L.. Assistant Professor. Psychology 

8.A.. Stanford University, 1971; MA,, University of Calilornia 

(Los Angeles). 1973; Ph.D.. 1976. 

White, Marilyn D., Assistant Protessor. College of Library and 
Information Services 

B.A.. Our Lady of the Lake College. 1962; MS. University of 
Wisconsin. 1963. Ph D . University ol Illinois. 1971 

Whittemore, E. Reed, Professor of English 

8 A . Yald University. 1941; LittD . Carleton College. 1971 

Widhelm, William B., Associate Prolessor ol Business and 

Management 

BE S . The Johns Hopkins University. 1959; MSE,, 1960; M.S.. 

1965. Ph D . 1969 

Wiedel, Joseph W., Associate Prolessor ol Geography 
B A . University ol Maryland. 1958; MA. 1963 

Wiley, Robert C, Prolessor ol Horticulture 

B S,. University ol Maryland. 1949; MS.. 1950; Ph D . Oregon 

State University. 1953 



Graduate Faculty / 43 



Wilkenfeld. Jonathan, Associate Professor of Government and 

Politics 

B S , University of Maryland, 1964. M A . George Washington 

University, 1966: Ph D , Indiana University, 1969 

Wilkerson, Thomas D., Research Professor. Institute for Fluid 

Dynamics and Applied f^athematics 

B S , University of Ivlichigan, 1953, fvl S . 1954; Ph D , 1962, 

Williams. David L., Associate Professor of Early Childhood and 
Elementary Education 

BS, Bradley University, 1952: Ivt Ed , University of Illinois at 
Urbana, 1956, Ed D , 1964 

Williams. Eleanor. Associate Professor. Food. Nutrition and 
Institution Administration 

B S . Texas Woman s University. 1945. fi^ S . Iowa State Univer- 
sity. 1947, Ph D , Cornell University, 1963 

Williams. Waller, F.. Professor of Dairy Science 

8,8-, University of IVIissoun, 1951 : fViS , 1952, Ph D . 1955 

Williams. William H.. Assistant Professor of History 

B A. Washington & Lee University, 1956: tvl A , Duke University, 

1960: PhD , 1965 

Wilson. Bruce D., Assistant Professor of fvlusic 

B IVIus , University of Ivlichigan, 1960: lullvlus , 1964: PhD, 

1973 

Wilson. Catharine L.. Assistant Professor of Measurements 
and Statistics 

B A , Marymount fyianhattan College. 1972: M.A,. Columbia 
University, 1973: Ed D , 1976 

Wilson. Gayle L., Associate Professor of English 

BA, Wayne State University, 1960: MA, University of 

Rochester, 1963, Ph D , 1965 

Wilson. John W.. Professor of Early Childhood and Elementary 
Education 

B A , Bov»ling Green State University, 1951 : MA,. Syracuse Uni- 
versity. 1953. Ph.D. 1964 

Wilson. Leda A., Associate Professor of Family and Community 

Development 

BS,. Lander College. 1943: MS. University of Tennessee. 

1950. EdD . 1954 

Wilson. Robert M.. Professor of Early Childhood and Ele- 
mentary Education 

B.S-. California State College (Pennsylvania). 1950. MS , Uni- 
versity of Pittsburgh. 1956: EdD . 1960, 

Winkenkemper. Horst E.. Associate Professor of Mathematics 
B A, National University of Mexico, 1963: MA,. Pnncelon 
University, 1965. Ph D , 1970 

Winton. Cathoun. Professor, English 

A,B , University of the South (Sewane), 1948: MA,. Vanderbilt 

University, 1950: M A , Princeton University, 1954: Ph.D.. 1955 

Wirth, Willis W., Professor of Entomology 
8 S . Iowa Stale University. 1940: M S . Louisiana State Univer- 
sity. 1947. Ph D . University of California. Berkeley. 1950, 

Witczak. Matthew W.. Associate Professor of Civil Engineenng 
8 S C E . Purdue University. 1962, M S C E , 1963, PhD , 1969 

Withers, Josephine, Assistant Professor of Art 

B A , Oberlin College. 1960: MA.. Columbia University. 1965: 

PhD , 1971 

Wodarski, Lois, Assistant Professor of Food. Nutntion and In- 
stitutional Administration 

BS . Florida State University. 1965: M.S. University of Ten- 
nessee. 1967: Ph D . 1976. 

Wolf. Duan Carl, Assistant Professor, Agronomy 

B S . University of Missouri. 1968: Ph D . University of California 

(Riverside). 1973 



Wolfe. Peter. Professor of Mathematics and Statistics 
B S . St Lawrence University. 1959. M S , Northwestern Univer- 
sity. 1961 : Ph New York University. 1965 

Wolk, Stephen. Associate Professor of Child Study 

B.A.. University of Pennsylvania. 1966. M A . Glassboro State 

College. 1969: Ph.D., Temple University. 1972 

Wolken, John D., Assistant Professor. Institute for Urban 

Studies 

8, A , University of Southern California. 1968: MA. 1973, Ph D 

1975 

Wolpert. A. Scott. Assistant Professor, Mathematics 

BA,. Johns Hopkins University. 1972: MA.. Stanford University, 

1974: Ph D , 1976 

Wolvin. Andrew D.. Associate Professor of Speech and Dra- 
matic Art 

B S , University of Nebraska, 1962, M A,, 1963: Ph D , Purdue 
University 1958 

Wonnacott. Paul. Professor of Economics 
8, A , University of Western Ontario, 1955, M A , Pnnceton Uni- 
versity, 1957, Ph D , 1959 

Woo. Ching-Hung. Professor of Physics and Astronomy 

B S , Lousiana Technological Institute, 1958: MS, University of 

California, Berkeley, 1959, Ph D , 1962. 

Wood. Francis E.. Associate Professor, Entomology 

BS , University of Missoun, 1958: MS . 1962, PhD . University 

of Maryland. 1970 

Woolf. Leonard. Professor of Secondary Education 

B S , The Johns Hopkins University. 1942, M.Ed,, University of 

Maryland, 1951: EdD . 1959, 

Woolpert. Stephen B.. Associate Professor, Government and 

Politics 

8 A , Gnnnell College, 1966: MA,. Johns Hopkins University, 

1968, Ph D Stanford University, 1977 

Wrenn. Jerry P.. Assistant Professor of Physical Education 
8 S , East Carolina College, 1961: M S.. University of Tennes- 
see. 1963 Ph D . University of Maryland. 1970 

Wright, Emmet L., Assistant Professor of Agncultural and Ex- 
tension Education and Secondary Education 
8,S , University of Kansas, 1963: MA, Wichita State University, 
1968: Ph D-. Pennsylvania State University. 1974 

Wright, Winthrop R., Associate Professor of History 
BA.Swarthmore College. 1958: MA., University of Pennsylvan- 
ia, 1960: PhD , 1964, 

Wu, Ching-Sheng, Research Professor, Institute for Fluid Dy- 
namics and Applied Mathematics 

8 S , IMational Taiwan University. 1954. MS. Virginia Polytech- 
nic Institute. 1956: Ph D . Pnnceton University, 1959. 

Wysong, John W., Professor of Agncultural and Resource Eco- 
nomics 

BS . Cornell University. 1953: M.S.. University of Illinois. 1954. 
PhD . Cornell University. 1957. 

Yaney. George L., Professor of History 
B.Mgt E.. Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. 1952. M.A.. Univers- 
ity of Colorado. 1956. Ph D.. Princeton University. 1961. 

Yang, Grace L.. Associate Professor of Mathematics and Statis- 
tics 

8. A.. National Taiwan University. 1960; MA. University of Cali- 
fornia. Berkeley, 1963; Ph.D., 1966. 

Yang, Jackson C, Professor of Mechanical Engineering 
8S, University of Maryland. 1958: M.A.. 1961. PhD, 1963. 



Yarian, Richard A., Assistant Professor of Health Education 
BS. Ball State University. 1971 ; MS , 1972: Ed. S. 1973. Ph.D.. 
University of Maryland. 1976. 

Yeh, Kwan-Nan, Assistant Professor of Textiles and Consumer 

Economics 

8 S . National Taiwan University. 1961 : M.S.. Tulane University. 

1965: Ph D.. University of Georgia. 1970 

Yodh, Gaurang B.. Professor of Physics and Astronomy 

B.Sc . University of Bombay. 1948. M.Sc.. University of Chicago. 

1951: PhD.. 1955 

Yorke, James Alan, Research Professor. Institute for Physical 

Science and Technology and Mathematics 

A.B . Columbia University. 1963: PhD . University of Maryland. 

1966 

Yoshioka, Gary A., Assistant Professor of Geography 
8 S . Lafayette College, 1966: PhD,. The Johns Hopkins Univer- 
sity. 1975 

Young, Bobby G.. Professor of Microbiology 

B A , Southeast Missoun State College. 1950: Ph.D., Ttie Johns 

Hopkins University. 1965 

Young, Edgar P., Professor of Animal Science 

B S . Ohio Stale University. 1954: MS.. 1956: Ph D., 1958 

Young, Oran R.. Professor. Government and Politics 

A.B-, Harvard University. 1962; M.A.. Yale University, 1964, 

PhD , 1965, 

Zajac. Felix E. III. Associate Professor of Electrical Engineer- 
ing 

BEE, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 1962: MS, Stanford 
University, 1965: PhD,, 1968 

Zaki. Kawthar A.. Associate Professor of Electrical Engineenng 
8 S , Ain-Syams University, 1962, MS , University of California, 
Berkeley, 1966: Ph D , 1969 

Zaicman. Lawrence Allen, Professor of Mathematics 

A,B , Dartmouth College. 1964; PHD . Massachusetts Institute 

of Technology. 1968 

Zedek, Michael, Professor of Mathematics and Statistics 
MS . Hebrew University of Jerusalem, 1952; Ph.D., Harvard 
University. 1956 

Zelkowitz, Marvin, Associate Professor of Computer Science 
BS , Renssalaer Polytechnic Institute, 1967; M.S., Cornell Uni- 
versity. 1969; Ph.D. 1971. 

Zipoy, David M., Associate Professor of Astronomy 
8 S . University of Minnesota. 1954; Ph D . 1957 

Zoller, William H., Associate Professor of Chemistry 

B S . University of Alaska. 1965. Ph.D.. Massachusetts Institute 

of Technology. 1969 

Zorn. Bice Sechi, Professor of Physics 
Dottore in Fiscia. University of Caglian, 1952 

Zorn, Gus T., Professor of Physics 

B.S., Oklahoma State Universit. 1948: M.S., University of New 

Mexico. 1953. Ph D . University of Padua, 1954, 

Zuckerman, Benjamin M., Professor of Astronomy 

BS , Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 1963; MS. 1963: 

Ph D . Harvard University. 1968 

Zwanzig, Robert W., Research Professor. Institute for Physical 
Science and Technology 

8 S . Brooklyn Polytechnic Institute. 1948; M.S . University of 
Southern California. 1950; Ph D . California Institute of Technol- 
ogy. 1952 



44 / Graduate Faculty 



N^r 3QU3l6 r rOy rams am requests for information should. be sent to the appropriate progrann at the 
University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742. 



Administration, 
Supervision and 
Curriculum Program 

Professor and Chairman: Stephens 
Professors: Anderson, Barman, 

Carbone, Dudley, James, McClure, 

McLoone', Newell, Perrin, Wedberg, 

VViggin 
Associate Professors: Goldman, Kelsey 
Assistant Professors: Clague, Clemson, 

Splaine 

'joint appointment with Economics 

The Departnnent of Administration, 
Supervision and Curriculum offers 
programs of study for the M.A., 
M.Ed., Ed.D., and Ph.D. degrees as 
weW as for the Advanced Graduate 
Specialist certificate. Areas of spe- 
cialization include: administration, 
supervision, curriculum, higher educa- 
tion, and educational technology. Pro- 
grams in all areas are individuallly de- 
signed for public or private elementary 
and secondary school specialists, per- 
sonnel in higher education institutions 
of education agencies. 

Admission and Degree Information 

Admission at the doctoral level is 
based upon an academic average of 
3.5 at the master's level, perfor- 
mance at the 50th percentile or better 
on the Miller Analogies test battery 
and an undergraduate average of 
3.0. Selective screening of qualified 
applicants at the master's, A.G.S., 
and doctoral levels is necessary in 
terms of limiting enrollment to the 
available faculty resources of the 
Department. 

The Department requires at least 
one year of residence for a doctoral 
degree. A field internship or its 
equivalency, is required of all doc- 
toral candidates. This internship is 
done under faculty supervision in 
schools, colleges or agencies, in 
roles that are consistent with the 
candidate's program emphasis. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

The Department has developed 
close working relationships with 
area schools, community colleges 
and education agencies so that 
they may serve as resources for 
the academic offerings on campus. 
Procedures have been established 
which facilitate the use of these 
agencies for research and field 
experiences. The Educational Tech- 
nology Center in the College of 
Education is used extensively by 
students in the Department, partic- 
ularly those in curriculum. 



Financial Assistance 

Some Graduate Assistantships are 
available to qualified graduate stu- 
dents. 

Additional Information 

For information and a departmental 
brochure, please write to the Direc- 
tor of the Graduate Program. 

Courses 

EDAD 440 utilization of Educational 
Media (3) Survey of classroom uses of 
instructional media. Tectiniques for 
integrating media into instruction. In- 
cludes preparation of a unit of instruc- 
tion utilizing professional and teacher 
produced media. 

EDAD 441 Graphic Materials for Instruc- 
tion (3) Prerequisite . EDAD 440 or con- 
sent of instructor. A laboratory course 
which combines graphic and photo- 
graphic processes for education and 
training purposes. Techniques include 
lettering, coloring, transparencies, 
illustrations, converting, duplicating 
transparent and opaque media. Em- 
ptiasis is placed on appropriate media 
selection for target audiences. Heavy 
student project orientation. 

EDAD 442 instructional Media Services 

(3) Prerequisites, teaching experience 
and EDAD 440, or equivalent. Proce- 
dures for coordinating instructional 
media programs; instructional materials 
acquisition, storage, scheduling, dis- 
tribution, production, evaluation and 
other service responsibilities; instruc- 
tional materials center staff coordina- 
tion of research, curriculum improve- 
ment and faculty development pro- 
grams. 

EDAD 443 Instructional Television Utili- 
zation (3) Combining televised lessons, 
on-campus seminars, and related work- 
book assignments, this course focuses 
upon planning for the various uses of 
instructional television with students. 
State, local school unit, school, and 
classroom uses will be illustrated 
through film and studio production. 
The aspects of producing ITV programs 
are developed through the television 
lessons and 'hands-on' assignments of 
the seminars. 

EDAD 444 Programmed Instruction (3) 

Analysis of programmed instruction 
techniques; selection, utilization and 
evaluation of existing programs and 
teaching machines; developing learning 
objectives; writing and validating pro- 
grams. 

EDAD 489 Field Experience in Educa- 
tion (1-4) Prerequisites, at least six sem- 
ester hours in education at the Univer- 
sity of Maryland plus such other prere- 
quisites as may be set by the major area 
in which the experience is to be taken. 
Planned field experience may be pro- 
vided for selected students who have 
had teaching experience and whose 
application for such field experience 
has been approved by the education 
faculty. Field experience is offered in a 



given area to both major and nonmajor 
students. NOTE — The total number of 
credits which a student may earn in 
EDAD 489, 888, and 889 is limited to a 
maximum of 20 semester hours. 

EDAD 498 Special Problems in Educa- 
tion (1-3) Prerequisite, consent of 
instructor. Available only to mature stu- 
dents who have definite plans for indi- 
vidual study of approved problems. 

EDAD 499 Workshops, Clinics, Insti- 
tutes (1-6) The maximum number of 
credits that may be earned under this 
course symbol toward any degree is six 
semester hours; the symtsol may be 
used two or more times until six semes- 
ter hours have been reached. The fol- 
lowing type of educational enterprise 
may be scheduled under this course 
heading: workshops conducted by the 
College of Education (or developed 
cooperatively with other colleges and 
universities) and not otherwise covered 
in the present course listing; clinical 
experiences in pupil-testing centers, 
reading clinics, speech therapy labora- 
tories, and special education centers; 
institutes developed around specific 
topics or problems and intended for 
designated groups. 

EDAD 602 The Junior College (3) 

EDAD 603 Problems in Higher Educa- 
tion (3) 

EDAD 605 Administrative Foundations 

(3) EDAD 605 is presented as the first 
of the four courses for students ma- 
joring in the field of educational admin- 
istration, supervision, and curriculum 
development. It attempts to structure a 
theoretical and research base for the 
study and practice of administration in 
the field of education by introducing 
the student to selected contributors 
to administration, and by indicating the 
multi-disciplinary nature of administra- 
tive study as it relates to purpose- 
determination, policy-definition, and 
task-accomplishment. 

EDAD 606 Administrative Behavior and 
Organizational Management (3) A criti- 
cal analysis of organizational manage- 
ment (informal and formal dimensions), 
an assessment of the contributions 
from other fields (traditional and 
emerging) to the study of administrative 
behavior and the governance of organi- 
zations, and an analysis and assess- 
ment of the administrator's motivations, 
perceptions, and sensitivity as determi- 
nants of behavior constitute the major 
units of study for EDAD 606 The theo- 
retical and research bases for these 
areas and such related concepts as 
status, role, systems, interpersonal 
relations, and sensitivity training are 
examined. 

EDAD 607 Administrative Processes (3) 

EDAD 607 is designed to develop com- 
petence with respect to selected Admin- 
istrative process areas. It examines 
efforts to develop theories and models 
in these areas and analyzes research 
studies and their implications for ad- 
ministrative practice. In addition it 

Graduate Programs / 45 



seeks to develop skill in selected pro- 
cess areas through such techniques as 
simulation, role-playing, case analysis, 
and computer-assisted instruction. 

EDAO 608 Administrative Reiationshlps 

(3) EDAD 608 is structured to provide 
the student of educational administra- 
tion wih an understanding of the var- 
ious groups and subgroups to which an 
administrator relates and to the sig- 
nificance of these relationships for 
leadership behaWor. It provides an op- 
portunity to examine and analyze signif- 
icant principles, concepts, and issues 
In the areas of personnel administra- 
tion, public relations, community, state, 
and federal agencies. The human rela- 
tions skills essential to effective leader- 
ship in these areas constitute the other 
dimension of this course. 

EDAD 611 The Organization and Admin- 
istration of Secondary Schoois (3) Pre- 
requisite, consent of instructor. The 
work of the secondary school principal. 
Includes topics such as personnel pro- 
blems, school-community relationships, 
student activities, schedule making, and 
Internal financial accounting. 

EDAD 612 School Finance and Business 
Administration (3) An introduction to 
principles and practices in the admin- 
istration of the public school finance 
activity. Sources of tax revenue, the 
budget, and the function of finance in 
the educational program are con- 
sidered. 

EDAD 614 School Plant Planning (2-3) 

An orientation course in which the plan- 
ing of school buildings is developed as 
educational designing with reference to 
problems of site, building facilities, and 
equipment. 

EDAD 616 Public School Supervision (3) 

The nature and functions of supervi- 
sion; various supervisory techniques 
and procedures; human relationship 
factors; and personal qualities for su- 
pervision. 

EDAD 617 Administration and Supervi- 
sion in Elementary Schools (3) Problems 
in administering elementary schools 
and improving instruction. 

EDAD 625 School Public Relations (3) 

A study of the interrelationship between 
the community and the school. Public 
opinion, propaganda, and the ways in 
which various specified agents and 
agencies within the school have a part 
in the school public relations program 
are explored. 

EDAD 634 The School Curriculum (2-3) 

A foundations course embracing the 
curriculum as a whole from early child- 
hood through adolescence, including a 
review of historical developments, an 
analysis of conditions affecting cur- 
riculum change, an examination of 
issues in curriculum making, and a 
consideration of current trends in cur- 
riculum design. 

EDAD 635 Principles of Curriculum 
Development (3) Curriculum planning, 
improvement, and evaluation in the 

46 / Graduate Programs 



schools; principles for the selection and 
organization of the content and learning 
experiences; ways of working in class- 
room and school on curriculum improve- 
ment. 

EDAD 640 Seminar in Educational Tech- 
nology, Research and Theory (3) Prere- 
quisite, EDAD 440. Review of research 
in educational technology and mass 
media of communication which relates 
to the instructional process; learning 
theory implications, sociological and 
economic considerations. 

EDAD 641 Selection and Evaluation of 
Instructional Media (3) Development of 
criteria for selection and evaluation of 
instructional materials for classroom, 
school and system use; includes mea- 
sures of readability, listenability, visual 
difficulty, and interest level. 

EDAD 642 Mediated Instructional Sys- 
tems (3) Prerequisite, EDAD 440 and 
EDAD 444. Survey of innovative instruc- 
tional systems. Comparison of effective- 
ness of alternate teaching-learning 
systems. System design to improve 
teaching-learning efficiency through 
instructional media. 

EDAD 644 Practicum in Instructional 
Systems (2-6) Prerequisite, EDAD 444 or 
EDAD 642. Design and development of 
experimental instructional materials or 
systems to solve a specific instructional 
problem in the field. 

EDAD 679 Seminar in Educational Ad- 
ministration and Supervision (2-4) Prere- 
quisite, at least four hours in educa- 
tional adminstration and supervision or 
consent of instructor. A student may 
register for two hours and may take 
the seminar a second time for an addi- 
tional two hours. 

EDAD 718 School Surveys (2-6) Prere- 
quisite, consent of instructor. Includes 
study of school surveys with emphasis 
on problems of school organization and 
adminstration, finance and school plant 
planning. Field work in school surveys 
is required. 

EDAD 721 Advanced School Plant Plan- 
ning (2) EDAD 614 is a prerequisite to 
this course. However, students with 
necessary background may be admitted 
without completion of EDAD 614. Em- 
phasis is given to analysis of the educa- 
tional program and planning of physical 
facilities to accommodate that program. 

EDAD 723 Practicum in Personnel Rela- 
tionships (2-6) Prerequisite, master's 
degree or consent of instructor. Prere- 
quisite may be waived with advisor's 
approval. Enrollment limited. Designed 
to help teachers, school adminstrators, 
and other school staff members to learn 
to function more effectively in develop- 
ing educational policy in group situa- 
tions. Each student in the course is 
required to be working concurrently in 
the field with a group of school staff 
members or citizens on actual school 
problems. 

EDAD 726 Child Accounting (2) An in- 
quiry into the record keeping activities 



of the school system, including an ex- 
amination of the marking system. 

EDAD 727 Public School Personnel 
Administration (3) A comparison of prac- 
tices with principles governing the sat- 
isfaction of school personnel needs, 
including a study of tenure, salary 
schedules, supervision, rewards, and 
other benefits. 

EDAD 750 Organization and Administra- 
tion of Teacher Education (3) Teacher 
education today-current patterns and 
significant emerging changes, particu- 
larly those involving teachers and 
schools. Deals with selection, curricu- 
lum, research, accredition, and institu- 
tion-school relationships. 

EDAD 798 Special Problems in Educa- 
tion (1-6) toaster's AGS, or doctoral 
candidates who desire to pursue special 
research problem under the direction of 
their advisors may register for credit 
under this number. 

EDAD 799 Master's Thesis Research 
(1-6) Registration required to the extent 
of six hours for master's thesis. 

EDAD 802 Curriculum in Higher 
Education (3) An analysis of research in cur- 
riculum and of conditions affecting curriculum 
change, with examination of issues in cur- 
riculum making based upon the history of 
higher education curriculum development. 

EDAD 803 Organization and Administra- 
tion of Higher Education (3) Organization 
and administration of higher education at the 
local, state, federal levels: and an analysis 
of administrative relationships and functions 
and their effects in curriculum and instruction. 

EDAD 805 College Teaching (3) Various 
methods of college instructions analyzed in 
relation to the curriculum and psychological 
basis. These would include the case study 
method, the demonstration method, the lec- 
ture method, the recitation method, teaching 
machines, teaching by television, and other 
teaching aids. 

EDAD 806 Seminar in Problems of Higher 
Education 

EDAD 837 Curriculum Theory and 
Research (2) 

EDAD 858 Adult Education (3) 

EDAD 859 Seminar in Adult Education (3) 

EDAD 879 Seminar in Teacher Education 
(3-6) A problem seminar in teacher edu- 
cation. A maximum of six hours may be 
earned in this course. 

EDAD 888 Apprenticeship in Education 
(1-9) Apprenticeships in the major area of 
study are available to selected students 
whose application for an apprenticeship has 
been approved by the education faculty. 
Each apprentice is assigned to work for at 
least a semester full-time or the equivalent 
with an appropriate staff member of a cooper- 
ating school, school system, or educational 
institution or agency. The sponsor of the ap- 
prentice maintains a close working relation- 
ship with the apprentice and the other 
persons involved. Prerequisites, teaching 
experience, a master's degree in education, 
and at least six semester hours in education 



at the University of Maryland. Note: the total 
number of credits which a student may earn 
in EDAD 489, 888, and 889 is limited to a 
maximum of twenty (20) semester hours 

EDAD 889 Internship in Education (3-16) 

Internships in the major area of study are avail- 
able to selected students who have teaching 
experience. The following groups of students 
are eligible: (A) any student who has been 
advanced to candidacy for the doctor's de- 
gree: and (B) any student who receives 
special approval by the education faculty for 
an internship, provided that prior to lal<ing an 
internship, such student shall have com- 
pleted at least 60 semester hours of graduate 
work, including at least 60 semester hours of 
graduate work, including at least six semes- 
ter hours in education at the University of 
Maryland. Each intern is assigned to work on 
a full-time basis for at least a semester with 
an appropriate staff member in a cooperating 
school, school system, or educational institu- 
tion or agency. The internship must be taken 
in a school situation different from the one 
where the student is regularly employed. The 
intern s sponsor maintains a close working rela- 
tionship with the intern and the other persons 
involved Note The total number of credits 
which a student may earn in EDAD 489. 888. 
and 889 is limited to a maximum of twenty 
(20) semester hours. 

EDAD 899 Doctoral Dissertation Research 

(1-8) Registration required to the extent of 6-9 
hours for an ED D project and 12-18 hours 
for a PHD dessertation. 



Aerospace Engineering 
Program 

Professor and Chairman: Anderson 
Professors: Coming. Melnik, Rivello 
Associate Professors: Barlow, Donaldson, 

Jones, Plotkin, Schaeffer 
Lecturers: Billig, Case, Fleig 

The Aerospace Engineering Depart- 
ment offers a broad program of grad- 
uate studies leading to the degrees of 
Master of Science and Doctor of Philos- 
ophy. The curricula for these degrees 
are adapted to nneet the objectives and 
background of the individual student 
and are planned by the student and his 
advisor. Applications for admission are 
invited from those holding a B.S, degree 
in engineering, the physical sciences, 
and mathematics. Aerodynamics and 
Propulsion, Structural Mechanics, and 
Flight Dynamics are the major areas of 
specialization available to graduate stu- 
dents. Within these areas of special- 
ization, the student can tailor programs 
such as Aircraft and Aerospace Vehicle 
Design, Naval Architecture. Comput- 
ational Mechanics, and High Temper- 
ature Gas Dynamics. 

Admission and Degree Information 

Two master's degree options are avail- 
able: thesis and non-thesis. No special 



departmental requirements are im- 
posed beyond the Graduate School 
requirements. 

For the Doctor of Philosophy degree, 
the Aerospace Engineering Department 
requires a minimum of 48 semester 
hours of course-work beyond the B,S. in- 
cluding (1) not less than 18 hours within 
one departmental area of special- 
ization, (2) not less than 9 hours from 
among the other areas of specialization 
in the department, (3) not less than 12 
hours in courses which emphasize the 
physical sciences or mathematics rath- 
er than their applications. The total in (2) 
plus that in (3) must be at least 24 hours 
of which no more than 6 are less than 
600 level. Written and oral compre- 
hensive examinations are also required. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

The research facilities of the depart- 
ment are available to the graduate stu- 
dent. The aerodynamic facilities include 
two subsonic, two supersonic, a hyper- 
sonic wind tunnel, a GAT-1 flight 
simulator, and a F-101 flight simulator. 
Facilities are also available for static 
and vibration testing of structures. An 
assortment of computers including a 
UNIVAC 1 106 and a UNIVAC 1 108 com- 
plemented by remote access units on a 
time-sharing basis are available. The 
Department provides special facilities 
for the use of students which include re- 
mote terminals and mini-computers. 
Under special circumstances, thesis re < 
search may be accomplished in off- 
campus research facilities. 

Financial Assistance 

A number of graduate assistantships 
and fellowships are available for finan- 
cial assistance. 

Courses 

ENAE 401 Aerospace Laboratory II (2) Pre- 
requisites, ENAE 305 and ENAE 345. Core- 
quisites: ENAE 452 and ENAE 471 . Appli- 
cation of fundamental measurement techni- 
ques to experiments in aerospace engine- 
ering, structural, aerodynamic, and 
propulsion tests, correlation of theory with 
expenmental results. 

ENAE 402 Aerospace Laboratory III (I) Pre- 
requisites: ENAE 305 and ENAE 345. Core- 
quisites: ENAE 452. ENAE 471, and ENAE 
475. Application of fundamental measure- 
meant techniques to expenments in aero- 
space engineering, structural, aerodynamic, 
flight simulation, and heat transfer tests. Cor- 
relation of theory with experimental results. 

ENAE 411 Aircraft Design. (3) Prerequisites: 
ENAE 345, ENAE 451 , and ENAE 371 . Theory 
background and methods of airplane design, 
subsonic and supersonic. 



ENAE 412 Design of Aerospace Vehicles 

(3) Prerequisites ENAE 345 and ENAE 371, 
theory, background and methods of space 
vehicle design for manned orbiting vehicles, 
manned lunar and planetary landing sys- 
tems 

ENAE 415 Computer-Aided Structural 
Design Analysis (3) Prerequisite ENAE 452 
or consent of instructor. Introduction to struc- 
tural design concepts and analysis techni- 
ques Introduction to computer software for 
structural analysis which is utilized to venfy 
exact solutions and perform parametric de- 
sign studies of aerospace structures, not 
open to students who have earned credit in 
ENAE 431, 

ENAE 445 Stability and Control of Aero- 
space Vehicles (3) Prerequisite: ENAE 345 
and ENAE 371 . Stability, control and miscel- 
laneous topics in dynamics. 

ENAE 451 Flight Structures I: Introduction 
to Solid Mechanics (4) Prerequisite: ENES 
220. An introduction to the analysis of aircraft 
structural members. Introduction to theory of 
elasticity, mechanical behavior of matenals, 
thermal effects, finite-difference approxi- 
mations, virtual work, vanational and energy 
pnnciples for static systems, 

ENAE 452 Flight Structures II: Structural 
Elements (3) Prerequisite: ENAE 451. Ap- 
plication of variational and energy principles 
to analysis of elastic bodies; stresses and de- 
flections of beams including effects of non- 
principal axes, non-homogeneity, and ther- 
mal gradients: differentialequations of beams, 
bars, and cables. Stresses and deflections of 
torsional members, stresses due to shear. 
Deflection analysis of structures. 

ENAE 453 Matrix Methods in Compu- 
tation Mechanics (3) preerequisite: ENAE 
452 or consent of instructor. Introduction to 
the concepts of computational analysis of 
continuous media by use of matrix methods. 
Foundation for use of finite elements in any 
field of continuum mechanics with emphasis 
on the use of the displacement method to 
solve thermal and structural problems. 

ENAE 457 Flight Structures III (3) Pre- 
requisite: ENAE 452 or equivalent. An ad- 
vanced undergraduate course dealing with 
the theory and analysis of the structures of 
flight vehicles. Stresses due to shear, in- 
determinate structures, plate theory, buck- 
ling and failure of columns and plates. 

ENAE 461 Flight Propulsion I (3) Prereq- 
uisites: ENME 216 and ENAE 471, Operating 
principles of piston, turbojet, tutioprop, ramjet 
and rocket engines, thermodynamic cycle 
analysis and engine performance, aerother- 
mochemistry of combustion, fuels, and pro- 
pellants. 

ENAE 462 Flight Propulsion "I (3) Pre- 
requisite: ENAE 461- Advanced and current 
topics m flight propulsion. 

ENAE 471 Aerodynamics II (3) Pre- 
requisite: ENAE 371 and ENME 216, Ele- 
ments of compressible flow with applications 
to aerospace engineenng problems, 

ENAE 472 Aerodynamics III (3) Prerequi- 
site: ENAE 371 . Theory of the flow of an in- 
compressible fluid. 

Graduate Programs / 47 



ENAE 473 Aerodynamics of High-Speed 
Flight. (3) Prerequisite: ENAE 472 or equi- 
valent. An advanced course dealing with 
aerodynamic problems of flight at supersonic 
and hypersonic velocities. Unified hyper- 
sonic and supersonic small disturbance the- 
ories, real gas effects, aerodynamic heating 
and mass transfer with application to hypersonic 
flight and re-entry. 

ENAE 475 Viscous Flow and Aerodynamic 
Heating (3) Prerequisities: ENAE 371, and 
Enae 471, and ENME 216 Fundamental as- 
pects of viscous flow, Navier-Stokes equa- 
tions, similarity, boundary layer equations; 
laminar, transitional and turbulent incom- 
pressible flows on airfoils, thermal tx)undary 
layers and convective heat transfer; conduc- 
tion through solids, introduction to radiative 
heat transfer. 

488 Topics in Aerospace Engineering 
(1-4) Techincal elective taken with the permis- 
sion of the student's advisor and instructor. 
Lecture and conference courses designed to 
extend the student's understanding of aero- 
space engineering. Current topics are em- 
phasized. 

ENAE 499 Elective Research (1-3) May be 

repeated to a maximum of three credits. Elec- 
tive for seniors in aerospace engineering with 
permission of the student's advisor and the in- 
structor. Original research projects termina- 
ting in a written report. 

ENAE 650 Variational Methods in Structur- 
al Mechanics (3) Prerequisites: ENAE 452 
or equivalent. Review of theory of linear elast- 
icity with introduction to cartesian tensors; ap- 
plication of calculus of variations and varia- 
tional principles of elasticity; Castigliano's the- 
orems; applications to aerospace structures. 

ENAE 652 Finite Element Method In En- 
gineering (3) Prerequisite: ENAE 453 and 
ENAE 650, or consent of instructor. Develop- 
ment of finite element representation of conti- 
nue using galerkin and variational techni- 
ques. Derivation of shell elements and para- 
metric representation of two and three dimen- 
sional elements. Application to aerospace 
structures, fluids and diffusion processes. 

ENAE 653 Nonlinear Finite Element An- 
alysis of Continua (3) Prerequisite: ENAE 
652. Finite element formulation of nonlinear 
and time dependent processes. Introduction 
to tensors, nonlinear elasticity, plasticity and 
creep. Application to nonlinear continua in- 
cluding aerospace structures, shells, radiation 
heat transfer, creep. 

ENAE 655 Structural Dynamics I (3) Pre- 
requisites: Math 246 and ENAE 452 or equi- 
valents; or consent of instructor. Advanced 
principles of dynamics necessary for struc- 
tural analysis: solutions of eigenvalue prob- 
lems for discrete and continuous elastic sys- 
tems, solutions to forced response boundary 
value problems by direct, modal, and trans- 
form methods. 

ENAE 656 Structural Dynamcis II (3) Pre- 
requisite: ENAE 655 or consent of instructor. 
Topics in aeroelasticity; wing divergence; 
aileron reversal; flexibility effects on aircraft 
stability denvatives; wing, empennage and 
aircraft flutter; aircraft gust response. 

ENAE 657 Theory of Structural Stability 

(3) Prerequisite: ENAE 451 or equivalent. 



Static and dynamic stability of structural sy- 
stems. Classification of leading systems; 
linear and nonlinear post-buckling behavior. 
Perfect and imperfect system behavior. 
Buckling and failure of columns and plates. 

ENAE 661 Advanced Propulsion (3) Pre- 
requisites: ENAE 461. 462. Special problems 
of thermodynamics and dynamics of aircraft 
power plants; jet, rocket and ramjet engines. 
Plasma, ion and nuclear propulsion for space 
vehicles. 

ENAE 662 Advanced Propulsion. (3) Pre- 
requisites, ENAE 461, 462. Special problems 
of thermodynamics and dynamics of aircraft 
power plants; jet rocket and ramjet engines. 
Plasma, ion and nuclear propulsion for space 
vehicles. 

ENAE 671 AeiOdynamics of Imcompres- 
sible Fluids (3) Prerequisite: Math 463 or 
permission of instructor. Fundamental equa- 
tions in fluid mechanics. Irrotational motion. 
Circulation theory of lift. Thin airfoil theory. 
Lifting line theory. Wind tunnel corrections. 
Perturbation methods. 

ENAE 672 Aerodynamics of Incompres- 
sible Fluids (3) Prerequisite, MATH 463 or 
permission of instructor. Fundamental equa- 
tions in fluid mechanics. Irrotational motion. 
Circulation theory of lift. Thin airfoil theory. 
Lifting line theory. Wind tunnel corrections. 
Perturbation methods. 

ENAE 673 Aerodynamics of Compres- 
sible Fluids. (3) Prerequisite: ENAE 472 or 
permission of instructor. One dimensional 
flow of a perfect compressible fluid. Shock 
waves. Two-dimensional lineanzed theory of 
compressible flow. Two-dimensional tran- 
sonic and hypersonic flows. Exact solutions 
of two dimensional isotropic flow. Linearized 
theory of three-dimensional potential flow. 
Exact solution of axially symmetrical potential 
flow. One-dimensional flow with friction and 
heat addition. 

ENAE 674 Aerodynamics of Compres- 
sible Fluids (3) Prerequisite: ENAE 472 or 
permission of instructor. One dimensional 
flow of a perfect compressible fluid. Shock 
waves. Two-dimensional linearized theory of 
compressible flow. Two-dimensional tran- 
sonic and hypersonic flows. Exact solutions 
of two dimensional isotropic flow. Linearized 
theory of three-dimensional potential flow. 
Exact solution of axially symmetrical potential 
flow. One-dimensional flow with friction and 
heat addition. 

ENAE 675 Aerodynamics of Viscous 
Fluids (3) Derivation of Navier Stokes equa- 
tions, some exact solutions: Boundary layer 
equations. Laminar flow-similar solutions, 
compressibility, transformations, analytic ap- 
proximations, numerical methods, stability 
and transition of turbulent flow Turbulent 
flow-isotropic turbulence, bounday layer 
flows, free mixing flows. 

ENAE 676 Aerodynamics of Viscous 
Fluids (3) Derivation of Navier Stokes equa- 
tions, some exact solutions: Boundary layer 
equations. Laminar flow-similar solutions, 
compressibility, transformations, analytic 
approximations, numerical methods, stabi- 
lity and transition to turbulent flow. Turbulent 
flow-istropic turbulence, boundary layer 
flows, free mixing flows. 



ENAE 688 Seminar (1-16) 

ENAE 757 Advanced Structural Dynamics 

(3) Prerequisite: ENAE 655 or equivalent. 
Fundamentals of proability theory pertinent to 
random vibrations, including correlation func- 
tions, and spectral densities; example ran- 
dom processes; response of single degree 
and multidegree of freedom systems. 

ENAE 788 Selected Topics in Aerospace 
Engineering (3) 

ENAE 789 Selected Topics in Aerospace 
Enineering. (3) 

ENAE 799 Master's Thesis Research (1-6) 

ENAE 899 Doctoral Dissertation Research 
(1-8) 



Agricultural and 
Extension Education 
Program 

Acting Chairman: Poffenberger 
Professors: Longest, Nelson 
Assistant Professors: Seibel. Whaples, 
Wheatley, Wright 

As a multidisciplinary department of 
several educational and social science 
specialities, the Departnnent of Agricul- 
tural and Extension Education services 
the academic and continuing education 
needs and interests of the Cooperative 
Extension Service, teachers of agricul- 
ture and professionals involved in con- 
tinuing education, community develop- 
ment, and environmental education. 

Admission and Degree Information 

The Master of Science and Doctor of 
Philosophy degree and the Advanced 
Graduate Specialist Certificate (requir- 
ing 30 credits beyond the master's de- 
gree) may be obtained in options in Agri- 
cultural Education, Environmental Ed- 
ucation, Extension and Continuing Edu- 
cation, and Community Development. 
Specialization options in Agricultural 
Education include teacher education, re- 
search and administration and super- 
vision. Specialization options under Ex- 
tension and Continuing Education in- 
clude staff development, program de- 
velopment, administration and supervi- 
sion, and continuing education. The mul- 
tidisciplinary Community Development 
program specialties include various so- 
cial science disciplines with research, 
teaching, and extension functions; hu- 
man and organizational planning and 
development; and public affairs edu- 
cation. 

In the Master of Science programs 
both thesis and non-thesis options are 
available. Applicants for the Master of 
Science program must present tran- 
scripts for evaluation. 



48 / Graduate Programs 



No specific number of credits is re- 
quired for the Doctor of Philosophy de- 
gree. Each student's program Is 
planned by his committee according to 
his previous education and experience, 
special Interests and needs, and pro- 
fessional plans. No foreign language Is 
required but is encouraged for those In- 
terested In International development 
areas. Students are encouraged to de- 
velop research techniques through spe- 
cific courses and participation in Depart- 
ment research programs. 

Applicants should present results of 
the Miller Analogies test with their appli- 
cations for admission. 

Additional Information 

For other requirements and guidelines 
concerning the above programs, con- 
tact the Department of Agricultural and Ex- 
tension Education. 

Courses 

RLED 422 Extension Education (3) The ag- 
ricultural extension service as an educational 
agency. The history, philosophy, objectives, 
policy, organization, legislation and methods 
used in extension work. 

RLED 423 Extension Communications (3) 

An introduction to communications in teach- 
ing and within an organization, including bar- 
riers to communication, the diffusion process 
and the application of communication pnn- 
ciples person to person, with groups and 
through mass media, 

RLED 426 Development and Management 
of Extension Youth Programs (3) Designed 
for present and prospective state leaders of 
extension youth programs. Program devel- 
opment, pnnclples of program management, 
leadership development and counseling; sci- 
ence, career selection and citizenship In 
youth programs, field experience in working 
with low income families' youth, urban work. 

RLED 427 Group Dynamics in Continuing 
and Extension Education (3) Concepts in- 
volved In working with groups planning exten- 
sion and continuing education programs. An- 
alysis of group behavior and group dynamics 
related to small groups and development of a 
competence in the selection of appropnate 
methods and techniques. 

RLED 464 Rural Life in Modern Society (3) 

Examination of the many aspects of rural life 
that affect and are affected by changes in 
technical, natural and human resources. Em- 
phasis IS placed on the role which diverse or- 
ganizations, agencies and institutions play in 
the education and adjustment of rural people 
to the demands of modern society. 

RLED 466 Rural Poverty in an Affluent So- 
ciety (3) Topics examined Include conditions 
under which people in poverty exist, factors 
giving nse to such conditions, problems faced 
by the rural poor, and the kinds of assistance 
they need to nse out of poverty. Topics and Is- 
sues are examined in the context of rural-ur- 
ban Interrelationships and their effects on ru- 
ral poverty. Special attention is given to past 



and present programs designed to alleviate 
poverty and to considerations and recom- 
mendations for future action. 

RLED 487 Conservation of Natural Re- 
sources (3) Designed primarily for teachers 
Study of state's natural resources-soil, water, 
fisheries, wildlife, forests, and minerals-natu- 
ral resources problems and practices. Exten- 
sive field study Concentration on subject 
matter. Taken concurrently with RLED 497 in 
summer season. 

RLED 488 Critique in Rural Education (1) 

Current problems and trends in rural edu- 
cation. 

RLED 489 Critique in Rural Education (1) 

Current problems and trends in rural edu- 
cation. 

RLED 497 Conservation of Natural Re- 
sources (3) Designed primarily for teachers. 
Study of state s natural resources-soil, water, 
fishenes, wildlife, forests, and minerals-natu- 
ral resources problems and practices. Exten- 
sive field study. IVIethods of teaching conser- 
vation Included. Taken concurrently with 
RLED 487 in summer season. 

RLED 499 Special Problems (1-3) Prereq- 
uisite, staff approval. 

RLED 606 Program Planning and Evalua- 
tion in Agricultural Education. (2-3)Sec- 

ond semester. Analysis of community agn- 
cultural education needs, selection and or- 
ganization of course content, cntena and pro- 
cedures for evaluating programs. 

RLED 626 Program Development in Ex- 
tension Education (3) Concepts in program 
planning and development. A conceptual ap- 
proach to a test framework for programming. 
Study and analysis of program design and Im- 
pllmentation In the extension service. 

RLED 628 Seminar In Program Planning 
(1-5) The student assists in the development 
of an educational program In an institutional 
or community setting. He also develops an 
individualized unit of study applicable to the 
program. Seminar sessions are based on the 
actual problems of diagnosing needs, plan- 
ning, conducting, and evaluating programs. 
Repeatable to a maximum of five credits. 

RLED 642 Continuing Education in Exten- 
sion (3) Studies the process through which 
adults have and use opportunities to learn 
systematically under the guidance of an 
agent, teacher or leader. A vanety of program 
areas will be reviewed giving the student an 
opportunity to plan, conduct and evaluate 
leaming activities for adults. 

RLED 661 Rural Community Analysis (3) 

First semester. Analysis of structure and 
function of rural society and application of so- 
cial understandings to educational pro- 
cesses. 

RLED 663 Developing Rural Leadership 
(2-3) First semester. Theories of leadership 
are emphasized. Techniques of identifying 
formal and informal leaders and the develop- 
ment of rural lay leaders. 

RLED 691 Research Methods in Rural 
Education (2-3) First semester. The scien- 
tific method, problem Identification, survey of 
research literature, preparing research plans, 
design of studies, expenmentation. analysis 
of data and thesis writing. 



RLED 699 Special Problems (1-3) Prereq- 
uisite, approval of staff 

RLED 707 Supervision of Student Teach- 
ing. (I) Summer session. Identification of ex- 
periences and activities in an effective stu- 
dent teaching program, responsibilities and 
duties of supervising teachers, and evalua- 
tion of student teaching 

RLED 789 Special Topics (1-3) May be re- 
peated to a maximum of nine credits provided 
content is different. 

RLED 798 Seminar in Rural Education 
(1-3) Problems in the organization, adminis- 
tration, and supervision of the several 
agencies of rural and/or vocational edu- 
cation. Repeatable to a maximum of eight se- 
mester credits. 

RLED 799 Master's Thesis Research (1-6) 
RLED 882 Agricultural College Instruction 
(1) 

RLED 899 Doctoral Dissertation Re- 
search (1-8) 



Agricultural and Resource 
Economics Programs 

Professor and Acting Chairman: Lessley 
Professors.Bender, Cain, Curtis, Foster, 

Ishee, (vloore, fvlurray, Poffenberger, Smith 

Stevens, Tuthill, Wysong 
Associate Professors: Hardie. Lawrence Via 
Assistant Professors: Bellows, Prindle, 

Strand 

The Department of Agricultural and Re- 
source Economics offers a course of 
study leading to the degrees of Master 
of Science and Doctor of Philosophy. 
The graduate program prepares stu- 
dents for careers by means of courses 
in traditional subject matter areas, re- 
search experiences designed to give 
competency in scientific methodology, 
and seminar and discussion opportuni- 
ties. 

The Department provides for two 
areas of specialization, agricultural eco- 
nomics and resource economics. Spe- 
cial fields in agricultural economics in- 
clude domestic and foreign agricultural 
development, international trade, agri- 
cultural marketing, farm management 
and production economics, agricultural 
policy and econometrics. Special fields 
in resource economics include land use, 
marine resources, water resources, and 
community and resource development. 
Both areas of specialization integrate 
opportunity for study from a variety of 
disciplines related to agricultural and re- 
source economics. 

Admission and Degree Information 

Thesis and non-thesis options are avail- 
able for the Master of Science degree in 
both areas of specialization. The thesis 

Graduate Programs / 49 



option requires a minimum of 24 hours 
course work with six hours of thesis; the 
non-thesis option requires 33 hours of 
course work. Students taking the non- 
thesis option, particularly in resource 
economics, are urged to participate in a 
two to three month internship with a 
public or private planning or manage- 
ment agency. 

Applicants with strong undergraduate 
records in diverse fields are considered 
for admittance to the Master of Science 
program. Necessary course prereq- 
uisites (without credit) can be com- 
pleted after admittance. No entrance 
examinations are required. 

Students with a bachelor's degree 
generally enter the master's program 
before applying for the doctoral pro- 
gram. Applicants holding a master's de- 
gree in an equivalent field from an ac- 
credited institution may be admitted for 
immediate doctoral study. A minimum of 
48 hours of course work beyond the 
bachelor's degree and 12 hours of dis- 
sertation research are required for the 
Ph.D degree. Qualifying examinations 
are administered on completion of basic 
theory course requirements, and written 
and oral comprehensive examinations 
are held when all course work has been 
completed. A final oral examination is 
held for the student to defend the dis- 
sertation. There is no foreign language 
requirement for any graduate degree. 

The time required to complete a mas- 
ter's degree is generally two years. Al- 
though it can be completed in 18 months 
of concentrated effort. The Ph.D. adds a 
minimum of two years of fairly concen- 
trated efforts. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

The Department actively employs the 
resources of many state, federal, and in- 
ternational agencies unique to the 
Washington, D.C. area to offer research 
and/or internship experience from the 
world of government and business. The 
Library of Congress in Washington and 
the National Agricultural Library of 
Beltsville (just north of the campus) 
greatly enhance teaching and research 
efforts. 

Financial Assistance 

Graduate assistantship are offered to 
qualified applicants on the basis of past 
academic performance and experience. 
A large proportion of the full-time stu- 
dents in the Department hold assistant- 
ships or some other form of financial aid. 
Part-time and summer work is often 



available for students not receiving fi- 
nancial aid. 

Additional Information 

A booklet. Curriculum, of the Depart- 
ment deschbes undergraduate and 
graduate programs, and gives a de- 
scription of all courses given by the De- 
partment. DARE Policy Handbook for 
the Graduate Program provides course 
requirements, examination procedures 
and descriptive material on M.S. and 
Ph.D. programs in both areas of special- 
ization. For more specific information, 
contact: 
Dr. Dean F. Tuthill 
Graduate Coordinator 
Department of Agricultural and 
Resource Economics 

Courses 

AREC 404 Prices of Agricultural Products. 

(3) An introduction to agricultural price be- 
havior. Emphasis is placed on the use of price 
information in the decision-making process, 
the relation of supply and demand in deter- 
mining agricultural prices, and the relation of 
prices to grade, time, location, and stages of 
processing in the marketing system. The 
course includes elementary methods of price 
analysis, the concept of parity and the role 
of price support programs in agricultural deci- 
sions. 

AREC 406 Farm Management. (3) The orga- 
nization and operation of the farm business to 
obtain an income consistent with family re- 
sources and objectives. Principles of produc- 
tion economics and other related fields are 
applied to the individual farm business. Labo- 
ratory period will be largely devoted to field 
trips and other practical exercises. 

AREC 407 Financial Analysis of the Farm 
Business. (3) Application of economic prin- 
ciples to develop criteria for a sound farm busi- 
ness, including credit source and use, pre- 
paring and filing income tax returns, methods 
of appraising farm properties, the summary 
and analysis of farm records, leading to effec- 
tive control and profitable operation of the farm 
business. 

AREC 410 Horse Industry Economics. (3) 

Prerequisite, ANSC 230 and 232. An intro- 
duction to the economic forces affecting the 
horse industry and to the economic tools re- 
quired by horse farm managers, trainers, and 
others in the industry. 

AREC 414 Introduction to Agricultural 
Business Management. (3) The different 
forms of businesses are investigated. Man- 
agement functions, business indicators, mea- 
sures of performance, and operational anal- 
ysis are examined. Case studies are used to 
show applications of management tech- 
niques. 

AREC 427 The Economics of Marketing 
Systems for Agricultural Commodities. (3) 

Basic economic theory as applied to the mar- 
keting of agricultural products, including price, 
cost, and financial analysis. Current devel- 
opments affecting market structure including 
effects of contractual arrangement, vertical 



integration, governmental policies and regu- 
lation. 

AREC 432 Introduction to Natural Re- 
sources Policy. (3) Development of natural 
resource policy and analysis of the evolution 
of public intervention in the use of natural re- 
sources. Examination of present policies and 
of conflicts between private individuals, pub- 
lic interest groups, and government agen- 
cies. 

AREC 445 World Agricultural Develop- 
ment and the Quality of Life. (3) An ex- 
amination of the key aspects of the aghcul- 
tural development of less developed coun- 
tries related to resources, technology, cultural 
and social setting, population, infrastructure, 
incentives, education, and government. En- 
vironmental impact of agricultural develop- 
ment, basic economic and social character- 
istics of peasant agriculture, theories and 
models of agricultural development, selected 
aspects of agricultural development planning. 

AREC 452 Economics of Resource Devel- 
opment. (3) Economic, political, and institu- 
tional factors which influence the use of land 
resources. Application of elementary eco- 
nomic principles in understanding social con- 
duct concerning the development and use of 
natural and man-made resources. 

AREC 453 Economic Analysis of Natural 
Resources. (3) Rational use and reuse of 
natural resources. Theory and methodology 
of the allocation of natural resources among 
alternative uses. Optimum state of conserva- 
tion, market failure, safe minimum standard, 
and cost-benefit analysis. 

AREC 484 Introduction to Econometrics in 
Agriculture. (3) An introduction to the appli- 
cation of econometric techniques to agricul- 
tural problems with emphasis on the assump- 
tions and computational techniques neces- 
sary to derive statistical estimates, test hy- 
potheses, and make predictions with the use 
of single equation models. Includes linear and 
non-linear regression models, internal least 
squares, discriminant analysis and factor 
analysis. 

AREC 485 Applications of Mathematical 
Programming in Agriculture, Business, 
and Economic Analysis. (3) This course is 
designed to train students in the application 
of mathematical programming (especially 
linear programming) to solve a wide variety of 
problems in agriculture, business and 
economics. The primary emphasis is on set- 
ting up problems and interpreting results. The 
computational facilities of the computer sci- 
ence center are used extensively, 

AREC 489 Special Topics in Agricultural 
and Resources Economics. (3) Repeatable 
to a maximum of 9 credits. 

AREC 495 Honors Reading Course in Agri- 
cultural and Resource Economics I. (3) 

Selected readings in political and economic 
theory from 1700 to 1850. This course de- 
velops a basic understanding of the develop- 
ment of economic and political thought as a 
foundation for understanding our present 
society and its cultural heritage. Prerequisite, 
acceptance in the honors program of the de- 
partment of agricultural and resource eco- 
nomics. 



50 / Graduate Programs 



AREC 496 Honors Reading Course in Agri- 
cultural and Resource Economics II. (3) 

Selected readings In political and economic 
theory from 1850 to the present. This course 
continues the development of a basic under- 
standing of economic and political thought 
begun in AREC 495 by the examination of 
modern problems in agncultural and re- 
source economics in the light of the material 
read and discussed in AREC 495 and AREC 
496. Prerequisite: successful completion of 
AREC 495 and registration in the honors pro- 
gram of the department of agricultural and 
resource economics. 

AREC 639 Internship in Resource Man- 
agement. (3) Prerequisite, permission of 
major advisor and department chairman. 
Open only to graduate students in the AREC 
resource management curriculum. Repeat- 
able to a maximum of four hours. 

AREC 689 Special Topics in Agricultural 
and Resource Economics. (3) First and 
second semester. Subject matter taught will 
be varied and will depend on the persons 
available for teaching unique and specialized 
phases of agncultural and resource econom- 
ics. The course will be taught by the staff or 
visiting agricultural and resource economists 
who may be secured on lectureship or visiting 
professor basis. 

AREC 698 Seminar. (1) First and second se- 
mesters. Students will participate through 
study of problems in the field, reporting tc 
seminar members and defending positions 
adopted. Outstanding leaders in the field will 
present ideas for analysis and discussion 
among class members. Students involved in 
original research will present progress reports. 
Class discussion will provide opportunity for 
constructive criticism and guidance. 

AREC 699 Special Problems in Agricul- 
tural and Resource Economics (1-2) First 
and second semesters and summer. Inten- 
sive study and analysis of specific problems 
in the field of agricultural and resource eco- 
nomics, which provide information in depth in 
areas of special interest to the student. 

AREC 799 Master's Thesis Research (1-6) 

AREC 804 Advanced Agricultural Price 
and Demand Analysis (3) Second se- 
mester. An advanced study in the theory of; 
(1) The individual consumer, (2) household 
behavior, and (3) aggregate demand. The 
concepts of price and cross elasticities of de- 
mand, income elasticity of demand, and elas- 
ticity of substitution will be examined in detail. 
The use of demand theory in the analysis of 
welfare problems, market equilibrium (with 
special emphasis on trade) and the problem 
of insufficient and excessive aggregate de- 
mand will be discussed. 

AREC 806 Economics of Agricultural Pro- 
duction (3) First semester. Study of the more 
complex problems involved in the long-range 
adjustments, organization and operation of 
farm resources, including the impact of new 
technology and methods. Applications of the 
theory of the firm, linear programming, activi- 
ty analysis and input-output analysis. 

AREC 824 Food Distribution Management 

(3) Theory and practice of the complex func- 
tional and institutional aspects of food distri- 
bution systems analyzed from the perspec- 



tive of management decision-making in the 
food industry. Possible long range economic 
effects of current structural adjustments: So- 
cial and ecological aspects of food industry 
management decision-making. 

AREC 832 Agricultural Price and Income 
Policy (3) Second semester, alternate years, 
1973. The evolution of agricultural policy in 
the United States, emphasizing the ongin and 
development of governmental programs, and 
their effects upon agricultural production, 
prices and income. 

AREC 844 International Agriculture Trade 

(3) Economic theory, policies and practices in 
international trade in agncultural products. 
Principal theones of international trade and fi- 
nance, agncultural trade policies of various 
countnes. and agncultural trade practices 

AREC 845 Agriculture in World Economic 
Development (3) First semester, alternate 
years, 1972. Theories and concepts of what 
makes economic development happen Ap- 
proaches and programs for stimulating the 
transformation from a primitive agncultural 
economy to an economy of rapidly develop- 
ing commercial agriculture and industry. 
Analysis of selected agncultural develop- 
ment programs in Asia, Afnca and Latin Ameri- 
ca 

AREC 852 Advanced Resource Econom- 
ics (3) Second semester, alternate years. As- 
sessment and evaluation of our natural, cap- 
ital, and human resources: the use of eco- 
nomic theory and vanous techniques to guide 
the allocation of these resources within a 
comprehensive framework; and the institu- 
tional arrangements for using these re- 
sources. ECON 403 or equivalent is a prereq- 
uisite. 

AREC 883 Agricultural and Resource Eco- 
nomics Research Techniques (3) First se- 
mester. Emphasis is given to philosophy and 
basic objectives of research in the field of 
agricultural and resource economics. The 
course is designed to help students define a 
research problem and work out logical proce- 
dures for executing research in the social 
sciences. Attention is given to the techniques 
and tools available to agncultural and re- 
source economics. Research documents in 
the field will be appraised from the standpoint 
of procedures and evaluation of the search 

AREC 899 Doctoral Dissertation Research 
(1-8) 



Agricultural Engineering 
Program 

Associate Professor and Acting Chairman: 

Stewart 
Professor: Harris 
Associate Professors: Felton, IVIerkel, 

Wheaton 
Assistant Professor: Ayars, Grant, Johnson 

The Department of Agricultural Engi- 
neering offers a graduate program of study 
with specialization In either agricultural 
or aquacultural engineering leading to 
the degree of Master of Science and 
Doctor of Philosophy. Courses and re- 
search problems place emphasis on the 



engineering aspects of the production, 
harvesting, processing and marketing 
of terrestrial and aquatic food and fiber 
products, with concern for the conser- 
vation of land and water resources and 
the utilization and/or disposal of by- 
products associated with biological sys- 
tems in order to maintain and enhance 
the quality of our environment while 
contributing to efficient production of 
food and fiber to meet increasing popu- 
lation demands. 

Admission and Degree Information 

Admission is open to B.S. graduates in 
engineering, physical science or biologi- 
cal science who meet graduate school 
requirements and who have satisfacto- 
rily completed a core of basic engineering 
courses. 

For the M.S. program, a mihimum of 30 
semester hours are required of which at 
least 12 hours will be agricultural engi- 
neering courses, 6 hours will be thesis 
research and 3 hours will be biometrics. 

A minimum of 60 credit hours beyond 
a BS are required for the Ph.D. program, 
of which at least 17 semester hours will 
be agricultural engineering courses, 12 
hours will be thesis research and 3 
hours will be biometrics. 

Only the thesis option is available for 
the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees. The Depart- 
ment has no language requirements for 
either graduate degree. Except for the 
above requirements a M.S. or Ph.D. pro- 
gram Is planned on a personal basis and 
is oriented toward the intellectual and 
professional objectives of the student. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

In addition to well-equipped laboratories 
in the Department, the facilities of the 
Agricultural Experiment Station, the 
Computer Science Center, and the Col- 
lege of Engineering are available. The 
new University of Maryland Center for 
Environmental and Estuanne Studies 
enhances the aquacultural phase of the 
Department's graduate program. 

Financial Assistance 

Financial assistance may be available 
to qualified candidates. 

Additional Information 

For additional information contact: 
Chairman 
Agricultural Engineering Department 

Courses 

AGEN 401 Agricultural Producation 
Equipment (3) Two lectures and one labora- 
tory per week. Prerequisite, AGEN 100, Prin- 
ciples of operation and functions of power 



Graduate Programs / 51 



and machinery units as related to tillage cut- 
ting, conveying, and separating units; and 
control mechanisms. Principles of internal 
combustion engines and power unit com- 
ponents. 

AGEN 402 Agricultural Materials Handling 
and Environmental Control (3) Two lec- 
tures and one laboratory per week. Prereq- 
uisite. AGEN 100. Charactenstics of con- 
struction materials and details of agricultural 
structures. Fundamentals of electncity, elec- 
tncal circuits, and electrical controls. Materi- 
als handling and environmental requirements 
of farm products and animals. 

AGEN 421 Power Systems (3) Two lectures 
and one two hour laboratory per week. Pre- 
requisites. ENME 216, ENEE 300 and ENME 
340. Analysis of energy conversion devices 
including internal combustion engines, elec- 
trical and hydraulic motors. Fundamentals of 
power transmission and coordination of 
power sources with methods of power trans- 



AGEN 422 Soil and Water Engineering (3) 

Three lectures per week. Prerequisite, ENME 
340. Applications of engineering and soil sci- 
ences in erosion control, drainage, irrigation 
and watershed management. Pnnciples of 
aghcultural hydrology and design of water 
control and conveyance systems. 

AGEN 424 Functional and Environmental 
Design of Agricultural Structures (3) Two 

lectures and one hour laboratory per week. 
Prerequisite, AGEN 324. An analytical ap- 
proach to the design and planning of func- 
tional and environmental requirements of 
plants and animals in semi-or completely en- 
closed structures. 

AGEN 432 General Hydrology (3) Three 
lectures per week. Qualitative aspects of 
basic hydrologic principles pertaining to the 
properties, distribution and circulation of wa- 
ter as related to public interest in water re- 
sources. 

AGEN 433 Engineering Hydrology (3) 

Three lectures per week. Prerequisites, Math 
246, ENCE 330 or ENME 340. Properties, 
distribution and circulation of water from the 
sea and in the atmosphere emphasizing 
movement overland, in channels and through 
the soil profile. Qualitative and quantitative 
factors are considered 

AGEN 435 Aquacultural Engineering (3) 

Prerequisite, consent of department. A study 
of the engineering aspects of development, 
utilization and conservation of aquatic sys- 
tems. Emphasis will be on harvesting and 
processing aquatic animals or plants as re- 
lated to other facets of water resources man- 
agement. 

AGEN 488 Topics in Agricultural Engi- 
neering Technology (1-3) Prerequisite, per- 
mission of the instructor. Selected topics in 
agncultural engineering technology of cur- 
rent need and interest. May be repeated to a 
maximum of six credits if topics are different. 
Not acceptable for credit towards major in 
agncultural engineering. 

AGEN 489 Special Problems in Agricul- 
tural Engineering (1-3) Prerequisite, ap- 
proval of department. Student will select an 
engineenng problem and prepare a technical 
report The problem may include design, ex- 
perimentation, and/or data analysis. 

52 / Graduate Programs 



AGEN 499 Special Problems in Agricul- 
tural Engineering Technology (1-3) Pre- 
requisite, approval of department. Not accept- 
able for majors in agricultural engineering. 
Problems assigned in proportion to credit. 

AGEN 601 Instrumentation Systems (3) 

Prerequisite, approval of department. Analysis 
of instrumentation requirements and tech- 
niques for research and operational agn- 
cultural or biological systems. 

AGEN 602 Mechanical Properties of Bio- 
logical Materials (3) Prequisite, differential 
equations. A study of the significance and the 
utilization of the mechanical properties of bio- 
logical matenals under vahous conditions of 
loading. Emphasis on particle motion: rela- 
tionships between stress and strain, force, 
velocity and acceleration: principles of work and 
energy, and theories of failure. 

AGEN 603 Biological Process Engineer- 
ing (3) First semester. Prerequisite, differen- 
tial equations. Interrelationships of physical 
properties as functions of moisture and tem- 
perature gradients in agricultural and aquacul- 
tural matenals. 

AGEN 605 Land and Water Resource De- 
velopment Engineering (3) First semester. 
Prerequisite, AGEN 422 or approval of de- 
partment. A comprehensive study of engineer- 
ing aspects of orderly development for land 
and water resources. Emphasis will be placed 
on project formulation, data aquisition. project 
analysis and engineering economy. 

AGEN 688 Advanced Topics in Agricul- 
tural Engineering (1-4) Prerequisite, con- 
sent of instructor. Advanced topics of current 
interest in the various areas of aghcultural en- 
gineenng. Maximum eight credits. 

AGEN Seminar (1) First and second se- 
mesters. 

AGEN 699 Special Problems in Agricul- 
tural and Aquacultural Engineering. (1-6) 

First and second semester and summer 
school. Work assigned in proportion to 
amount of credit. 

AGEN 799 Master's Thesis Research (1-6) 

AGEN 899 Doctoral Dissertation Re- 
search (1-8) 

Agronomy Program 

Professor and Chairman: Miller 
Professors: Axley, Clark, Decker, Foss, 

F.P. Miller, Strickling 
Associate Professors: Aycock, Bandel, Burt, 

Fanning, Mulchi, Parochetti 
Assistant Professors: Darrah, Johnson, 

Kenworthy, Undersander, Wolf 

The Department of Agronomy offers 
graduate courses of study leading to the 
degrees of Master of Science and Doc- 
tor of Philosophy. The student may pur- 
sue major vi/ork in the crops division or In 
the soils division of the Department. 
Programs are offered in cereal crop pro- 
duction, forage management, turf 
management, plant breeding, tobacco 
production, crop physiology, weed sci- 
ence, soil chemistry, soil physics, soil 
fertility, soil and water conservation, soil 



classification, soil survey and land use, 
soil mineralogy, soil biochemistry, soil 
microbiology, air pollution, waste dis- 
posal, and soil environment interactions. 

Admission and Degree Information 

Thesis and non-thesis options are avail- 
able for the Master of Science degree. A 
bachelor's degree in Agronomy is not 
required if the student has adequate 
training in the basic sciences. All stu- 
dents must complete the Master of Sci- 
ence degree before admission to the 
doctoral program. Departmental regula- 
tions have been assembled for the guid- 
ance of candidates for graduate de- 
grees. Copies of these regulations are 
available from the Department of Agron- 
omy. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

The Agronomy Department has over 20 
well-equipped laboratories to carry out 
basic and applied research in crop and 
soil science. Basic equipment in the 
laboratories include: X-ray diffraction 
and spectrophotometer, gas chromato- 
graph, isotope counters, petrographic 
microscopes, neutron soil moisture 
probe and scaler, and carbon furnace. 
Growth chambers, extensive green- 
house space, and five research farms 
permit a wide range of environmental 
conditions for research into plant growth 
processes. A computer center, located 
on campus, is available for use by the 
Department. The University and the 
new National Agricultural Sciences Li- 
braries, supplemented by the Library 
of Congress, make the library re- 
sources among the best in the nation. 
Many projects of the Department are 
conducted in cooperation with the Agri- 
cultural Research Service of the United 
States Department of Agriculture with 
headquarters located three miles from 
the campus. 

Financial Assistance 

A limited number of research assistant- 
ships and teaching assistantships are 
available for qualified applicants. 

Courses 

AGRO 403 Crop Breeding. (3) Prerequisite, 
BOTN 414 or ZOOL 246. Principles and 
methods of breeding annual self and cross- 
pollinated plant and perennial forage spe- 
cies. 

AGRO 404 Tobacco Production (3) Pre- 
requisite, BOTN too. A study of the history, 
adaptation, distribution, culture, and im- 
provement of various types of tobacco, with 
special emphasis on problems in Maryland 
tobacco production. Physical and chemical 
factors associated with yield and quality of to- 
bacco will be stressed. 



AGRO 405 Turf Management (3) Two lec- 
tures and one laboratory period per week. 
Prerequisite. BOTN 100 . A study of princi- 
ples and practices of managing turf for lawns, 
golf courses, athletic fields, playgrounds, air- 
fields and fiigfiways for commencal sod pro- 
duction. 

AGRO 406 Forage Crop Production (3) 

Prerequisites: BOTN 101, and AGRO 100; or 
concurrent enrollment in tfiese courses. A 
general look at world grasslands: production 
and management requirements of major 
grasses and legumes for quality fiay. silage 
and pasture for livestock feed: new cultivar 
development and release; seed production 
and distribution of improved cultivars 

AGRO 407 Cereal and Oil Crops (3) Prereq- 
uisites: BOTN 101 and AGRO 100; or concur- 
rent enrollment in these courses. A study of 
principles and practices of corn, small grains, 
rice, millets, sorghums, and soybeans and 
other oil seed crops. A study of seed produc- 
tion, processing, distribution and federal and 
state seed control programs of corn, small 
grains and soybeans. 

AGRO 411 Soil Fertility Principles (3) Pre- 
requisite. AGRO 202 . A study of the chemi- 
cal, physical, and biological characteristics of 
soils that are important in growing crops. Soil 
deficiencies of physical, chemical, or biologi- 
cal nature and their correction by the use of 
lime, fertilizers, and rotations are discussed 
and illustrated. 

AGRO 412 Commercial Fertilizers (3) Pre- 
requisite, AGRO 202 or permission of instruc- 
tor. A study of the manufacturing of com- 
mercial fertilizers and their use in soils for effi- 
cient crop production. 

AGRO 413 Soil and Water Conservation 

(3) Two lectures and one laboratory penod a 
week. Prerequisite, AGRO 202 or permission 
of instructor. A study of the importance and 
causes of soil erosion, methods of soil ero- 
sion control, and the effect of conservation 
practices on soil-moisture supply. Special 
emphasis is placed on farm planning for soil 
and water conservation. The laboratory peri- 
od will be largely devoted to field trips. 

AGRO 414 Soil Classification and Ge- 
ography. (4) Three lectures and one labora- 
tory period a week. Prerequisite, AGRO 202 
or permission of instructor, A study of the 
genesis, morphology, classification and geo- 
graphic distribution of soils. The broad pnnci- 
ples governing soil formation are explained. 
Attention is given to the influence of geo- 
graphic factors on the development and use 
of the soils in the United States and other 
parts of the world. The laboratory periods will 
be largely devoted to the field tnps and to a 
study of soil maps of various countries. 

AGRO 415 Soil Survey and Land Use. (3) 

Two lectures and one laboratory penod a 
week. An introduction to soil survey inter- 
pretation as a tool in land use both in agri- 
cultural and urban situations. The implica- 
tions of soil problems as delineated by soil 
sua'eys on land use will be considered. 

AGRO 417 Soil Physics. (3) Two lectures 
and one laboratory period a week. Prerequi- 
site, AGRO 202 and a course in physics, or 
permission of instructor. A study of physical 



properties of soils with special emphasis on 
relationship to soil productivity. 

AGRO 421 Soil Chemistry. (3) One lecture 
and two laboratory periods a week Prereq- 
uisite. AGRO 202 or permission of instructor. 
A study of the chemical composition of soils: 
cation and anion exchange: acid, alkaline 
and saline soil conditions: and soil fixation of 
plant nutrients. Chemical methods of soil 
analysis will be studied with emphasis on 
their relation to fertilizer requirements. 

AGRO 422 Soil Biochemistry. (3) Two lec- 
tures and one laboratory period a week. Pre- 
requisite. AGRO 202, CHEfVl 104 or consent 
of instructor. A study of biochemical proces- 
ses involved in the formation and decom- 
position of organic soil constituents. Signif- 
icance of soil-biochemical processes in- 
volved in plant nutntion will be considered. 

AGRO 423 Soil-Water Pollution. (3) Pre- 
requisite, background in biology and CHEM 
104. Reaction and fate of pesticides, agri- 
cultural fertilizers, industrial and animal 
wastes in soil and water will be discussed. 
Their relation to the environment will be em- 
phasized 

AGRO 451 Cropping Systems. (2) Prerequi- 
site, AGRO 102 or equivalent. The coordina- 
tion of information from vanous courses in the 
development of balanced cropping systems, 
appropriate to different objectives In various 
areas of the state and nation. 

AGRO 453 Weed Control. (3) Two lectures 
and one laboratory penod a week. Prerequi- 
site. AGRO 1 02 or equivalent. A study of the 
use of cultural practices and chemical herbi- 
cides in the control of weeds. 

AGRO 499 Special Problems in Agronomy. 
(1-3) Prerequisites. AGRO 202. 406. 407. or 
permission of instructor. A detailed study, in- 
cluding a written report of an important prob- 
lem in agronomy. 

AGRO 601 Advanced Crop Breeding. (2) 
Alternate years (offered 1973-74). Prerequi- 
site, AGRO 403 or equivalent. Genetic, cyto- 
genetic, and statistical theories underlying 
methods of plant breeding. A study of quanti- 
tative inheritance, herterosis, heritability, in- 
terspecific and intergeneric hybhdization, 
polyploidy, stenlity mechanisms, inbreeding 
and outbreeding and other topics as related 
to plant breeding. 

AGRO 602 Advanced Crop Breeding. (2) 

Altelrnate years (offered 1973-74). Prerequi- 
site, AGRO 601 or equivalent Genetic, cyto- 
genetic, and statistical theories underlying 
methods of plant breeding. A study of quan- 
titative inhentance, herterosis, heritability, in- 
terspecific and intergenenc hybndization, 
polyploidy, sterility mechanisms, inbreeding 
and outbreeding, and other topics as related 
to plant breeding. 

AGRO 608 Research Methods. (2) Second 
semester. Prerequisite, permission of staff. 
Development of research viewpoint by de- 
tailed study and report on crop research of the 
fylaryland experiment station or review of liter- 
ature on specific phases of a problem. 

AGRO 722 Advanced Soil Chemistry. (3) 

Second semester, alternate years (offered 
1972-73). One lecture and two laboratory 
periods a week. Prerequisites, AGRO 202 
and permission of Instructor. A continuation 



of AGRO 421 with emphasis on soil chem- 
istry of minor elements necessary for plant 
growth 

AGRO 789 Recent Advances in Agronomy. 
(2-4) First semester Two hours each year 
Total credit four hours. Prerequisite, permis- 
sion of instructor A study of recent advances 
in agronomy research. 

AGRO 798 Agronomy Seminar. (1) First and 
second semesters Total credit toward IVIaster 
of science degree, 2; toward Ph.D degree, 6, 
Prerequisite, permission of instructor, 

AGRO 799 Master's Thesis Research. (1-6) 

AGRO 802 Breeding for Resistance to 
Plant Pests. (3) Second semester, alternate 
years, (offered 1972-73.) Prerequisites. 
ENTIVt 252, BOTN 221 , AGRO 403, or per- 
mission of instructor. A study of the develop- 
ment of breeding techniques for selecting 
and utilizing resistance to insects and diseases 
in crop plants and the effect of resistance on 
the interrelationships of host and pest. 

AGRO 804 Technic in Field Crop Research. 

(2) Second semester, alternate years (of- 
fered 1972-73.) Field plot technique, applica- 
tion of statistical analysis to agronomic data, 
and preparation of the research project, 

AGRO 805 Advanced Tobacco Production. 

(2) First semester, alternate years (offered 
1973-1974.) Prerequisite, permission of in- 
structor. A study of the structural adaption 
and chemical response of tobacco to environ- 
mental vanations. Emphasis will be placed on 
the alkaloids and other unique components. 

AGRO 806 Herbicide Chemistry and Physiol- 
ogy. (2) Second semester, alternate years 
offered 1972-1973). Prerequisite, AGRO 
453 and CHEM 104 or permission of instruc- 
tor. Two lectures a week. The importance of 
chemical structure in relation to biologically 
significant reactions will be emphasized in 
more than 10 different herbicide groups. Re- 
cent advances in herbicidal metabolism, 
translocation, and mode of action will be re- 
viewed. Adsorption, decomposition and 
movement in the soil will be studied. 

AGRO 807 Advanced Forage Crops. (2) 

First semester, alternate years (offered 
1972-1973). Prerequisite, BOTN 441 or equiv- 
alent, or permission of instructor. A funda- 
mental study of physiological and ecological 
responses of grasses and legumes to environ- 
mental factors, including fertilizer elements, 
soil moisture, soil temperature, humidity, 
length of day, quality and intensity of light, 
wind movement, and defoliation practices. 
Relationship of these factors to life history, 
production, chemical and botanical composi- 
tion, quality, and persistence of forages will be 
considered. 

AGRO 821 Advanced Methods of Soil In- 
vestigation. (3) First semester, alternate 
years (offered 1973-1974). Prerequisites, 
AGRO 202 and permission of instructor. An 
advanced study of the theory of the chemical 
methods of soil Investigation with emphasis 
on problems involving application of physical 
chemistry. 

AGRO 831 Advanced Soil Mineralogy. (3) 

First semester, alternate years (offered 
1972-1973) Prerequisites. AGRO 202 and 
permission of instructor. A study of the struc- 

Graduate Programs / 53 



ture, physical-chemical characteristics and 
identification methods of soil minerals, particu- 
larly clay minerals, and their relationship to 
soil genesis and productivity. 
AGRO 832 Advanced Soil Physics. (3) 
Second semester, alternate years (offered 
1973-1974). Prerequisites AGRO 202 and 
permission of instructor. An advanced study 
of physical properties of soils. 

AGRO 899 Doctoral Dissertation Research 
(1-8) 



American Studies 
Program 

Associate Professor and Director: 

Lounsbury 
Professors: Beall, Corrigan 
Adjunct Professor: Washburn 
Associate Professors: Mintz 

The American Studies Program, offer- 
ing the M.A. and Ph.D. degrees, pro- 
vides a unique combination of oppor- 
tunities for the individual seeking to 
study our civilization at the graduate 
level: 1) an academic community lo- 
cated near the nation's capital; 2) a fac- 
ulty, trained in American Studies, that 
offers courses in vi^hich the student may 
integrate a variety of cultural materials 
and develop his program through the 
channels of interdisciplinary scholar- 
ship; 3) the availability of courses em- 
phasizing American materials in the tra- 
ditional departments of Anthropology, 
Architecture, Art, Economics, Edu- 
cation, English, Geography, Govern- 
ment and Politics, History, Journalism, 
Music, Philosophy, Psychology, 
Speech and Dramatic Arts. 

The proseminar in American Studies 
embodies much of the philosophy of the 
graduate program: it allows the new 
major to share the perceptions he has 
gained in his undergraduate training. He 
is introduced to methodology stressing 
the value of art, literature, technology, 
popular culture, and anthropology in the 
observation of cultural patterns. All of 
the reading assignments, although they 
display different terminology and writing 
styles, are evaluated in terms of the 
authors' endeavors to expand the role of 
the intellectual in the academy and in 
American society. Lastly, the prosemi- 
nar introduces each participant to alter- 
natives of focus In his future research 
and reading. 

The more advanced American Stud- 
ies seminars vary from semester to 
semester so that both students and fac- 
ulty may explore new directions for illu- 
minating a certain segment of our civili- 

54 / Graduate Programs 



zation. Frequently, the seminars con- 
centrate on a specific period of Ameri- 
can culture-Antebellum American, the 
Gilded Age, the 1930's, the 1960's-or 
emphasize thematic materials calling 
for a multi-perspective methodology- 
myths and symbols of the communica- 
tions revolution, humor and satire in 
American life, or national identity in the 
United States. An important feature of 
the graduate program is the Smith- 
sonian Institution, where the serious stu- 
dent of matehal artifacts can take advan- 
tage of the seminars, exhibits and inde- 
pendent reading courses prepared by a 
highly trained staff. 
Admission and Degree Information 
The master's degree candidate, who 
will normally undertake a full year of 
course work (30 semester hours), pos- 
sesses a number of alternatives from 
which to choose a program meeting his 
professional needs and interests. In ad- 
dition to the American Studies semi- 
nars, he selects an area of concentra- 
tion in one of the departments listed 
above. Once he has met the specific re- 
quirements (6 hours in AMST 618: "In- 
troductory Seminars in American Stud- 
ies"; 6 hours in Advanced American Stud- 
ies Seminars) for the degree, he may 
pursue his interests in the traditional dis- 
ciplines or he may select a sequence of 
courses suggesting new perspectives 
on the interaction of the personality and 
the environment, including classes from 
departments which address themselves 
to minority group behavior, to an evalua- 
tion of the mass media's impact on the 
human sensibility, or to a consideration 
of global patterns emerging in Europe, 
Africa and Asia. 

Before receiving the M.A. degree, the 
candidate takes a comprehensive ex- 
amination drawing upon his ability to in- 
tegrate the materials of his particular pro- 
gram. Research oriented majors may 
wish to write a thesis in place of six 
hours of course credit. 

The majority of the students accepted 
into the doctoral program have received 
an M.A. degree in American Studies. 
The admissions committee will also ac- 
cept qualified individuals who have their 
master's degrees in other fields if they 
have had a strong emphasis in Amer- 
ican materials. Because of the highly se- 
lective nature of the Ph.D. program, ap- 
plicants may be asked to visit the univer- 
sity for an interview to clarify the extent 
of their preparation in the study of Ameri- 
can culture. Certain promising candi- 
dates will be required to remove deficien- 



cies in their training by taking specific 
undergraduate courses recommended 
by the advisors of the program. 

The student must take 6 semester 
hours of AMST 618 "Introductory Semi- 
nar In American Studies "; 3 hours of the- 
ory and methodology courses; and 6 
hours of Advanced Seminar Work in 
American Studies. The remaining hours 
will be distributed among the programs 
and departments supporting the stu- 
dent's area of specialization. 

The requirements for the doctoral de- 
gree are flexible and enable the candi- 
date to complete his course work within 
a year of intensive study (30 semester 
hours beyond the M.A., including an 18- 
credit residency requirement). The stu- 
dent also demonstrates his proficiency 
in a foreign language or in an analytical 
tool such as computer science, success- 
fully completes a comprehensive ex- 
amination, and submits a thesis giving 
evidence of original research and inter- 
pretation. 

If any student wishes to consider a 
topic which is not found in formal 
classes at the university, he is free to 
construct a reading program with the 
guidance of a faculty member in Amer- 
ican Studies or in one of the related dis- 
ciplines. The comprehensive examina- 
tion is based on three separate seg- 
ments of study; theories and methods in 
American Studies; an area of concen- 
tration (usually in American history or lit- 
erature); a specialized field related to 
the themes and time span to be investi- 
gated in the dissertation (for example 
Popular Culture, Afro-American Stud- 
ies, American Thought, American Art 
and Technology, Urban Studies, Wom- 
en's Studies). 

The American Studies thesis is there- 
fore the logical extension of the courses 
and examination areas decided upon 
by the graduate student himself. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

The proximity of many federal institu- 
tions allows for a firsthand appreciation 
of politics and contemporary life, while 
the facilities of the National Archives 
and the Library of Congress give the his- 
torian access to the materials document- 
ing the experiences of past generations. 
Important galleries, including the Na- 
tional Collection of Fine Arts and the Na- 
tional Gallery of Art, exhibit the high 
points of creative expression in the vis- 
ual arts. The holdings of the Smithson- 
ian Institution possess numerous mani- 
festations of the native vernacular tradi- 



tions in architecture and technology, in 
the folk arts, and in American Indian cul- 
ture. The District of Columbia and its sur- 
rounding regions represent an impres- 
sive aggregate of associations and com- 
munities-alternatives to traditional poli- 
tics such as Common Cause, the focus 
upon black cultural identity found in the 
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum, the 
new cities of Columbia, fvlaryland and 
Reston, Virginia - which seek to trans- 
cend the crises of urban America in a 
creative manner. 

The program, drawing upon the re- 
sources of its cultural environment, of- 
fers the individual an education in the 
most meaningful sense: a personal con- 
frontation with academic tradition re- 
lated to the processes of immediate and 
contemporary social change. 

Additional Information 

For additional information, please write 
to the Director of Graduate Studies, 
American Studies Program, University 
of fVlaryland. 

Courses 

AMST 426 Culture and the Arts In Amer- 
ica. (3) Prerequisite, junior standing. A study 
of American institutions, the intellectual and 
esthetic climate from the colonial period to 
the present. 

AMST 427 Culture and the Arts in Amer- 
ica. (3) Prerequisite, junior standing. A study 
of American institutions, the intellectual and 
esthetic climate from the colonial period to 
the present. 

AMST 436 Readings in American Studies. 

(3) Prerequisite, junior standing. An historical 
survey of American values as presented in 
various key wntings. 

AMST 437 Readings in American Studies. 

(3) Prerequisite, junior standing. An historical 
survey of American values as presented in 
various key writings. 

AMST 446 Popular Culture In America. (3) 

Prerequisite, junior standing and permission 
of instructor. A survey of the historical de- 
velopment of the popular arts and modes of 
popular entertainment in America. 

AMST 447 Popular Culture in America. (3) 

Prerequisite, junior standing and AMST 446. 
Intensive research in the sources and 
themes of contemporary American popular 
culture. 

AMST 498 Special Topics in American 
Studies. (3) Prerequisite: A course in Ameri- 
can history, literature, or government, or con- 
sent of the instructor. Topics of special in- 
terest. Repeatable to a maximum of 6 credits 
when topics differ. 

AMST 618 Introductory Seminar in Amer- 
ican Studies (3) 

AMST 628 Seminar In American Studies 

(3) 

AMST 629 Seminar in American Studies 

(3) 



AMST 638 Orientation Seminar-Material 
Aspects of American Civilization. Class 
Meets at the Smithsonian. (3) 

AMST 639 Reading Course in Selected 
Aspects of American Civilization. Class 
Meets at the Smithsonian. (3) 

AMST 698 Directed Readings in American 
Studies. (3) This course is designed to pro- 
vide students with the opportunity to pursue 
independent, interdisciplinary research and 
reading in specific aspects of American cul- 
ture under the supervision of a faculty mem- 
ber. Repeatable to a maximum of six credits 

AMST 799 Master's Thesis Research. (1-6) 

AMST 899 Doctoral Dissertation Re- 
search. (1-8) 



Animal Sciences Program 

Professor and Program Chairman: Davis 

Professors: (Animal Science) Green, Flyger, 
Leffel, Young; (Dairy Science) Cairns. 
Keeney, King, Mattick, Vandersall, 
Williams: (Veterinary Science) Hammond, 
IVIohanty. 

Associate Professors: (Animal Science) 
Buric, DeBarthe: (Dairy Science) 
Douglass, Wesfhoff: (Veterinary Science) 
Albert, Dutta, l^arquardt. 

Assistant Professors: (Animal Science) 
McCall, Kunkle: (Dairy Science) 
Holdaway, t\/lajeskie, tVlather, Vijay; (Veter- 
inary Science) Campbell, Davidson, 
Jacobson, Ingling, 

The Graduate Program in the Animal 
Sciences offers work leading to the de- 
grees of Master of Science and Doctor 
of Philosophy. Both the thesis and non- 
thesis option are available for the Mas- 
ter's Degree. Areas of concentration with- 
in the Program include animal nutrition, 
physiology, genetics, management, 
pathology and virology for all of the 
classes and species of animals listed. 
Opportunities for study related to do- 
mestic animals, marine and wildlife are 
available. 

Degrees with research specialities 
identified with meat, milk and other dairy 
products may be undertaken in this pro- 
gram or in the Graduate Program in 
Food Science, in which appropnate 
faculty of these Departments also par- 
ticipate. 

Admission and Degree Information 

Applicants are requested to submit 
scores of the Graduate Record Ex- 
amination. 

One course at the graduate level in 
biochemistry and one in biometrics and 
two credits of program seminar are re- 
quired for the M.S. Degree. Students en- 
rolled in the non-thesis option are ex- 
pected to defend their scholarly paper in 
an oral examination. Two academic 
years, including the summer for re- 



search, are usually required for complet- 
ing the M.S. Entehng students should 
have an academic background com- 
mensurate with a baccalaurate degree 
in the Animal Sciences. Those not hav- 
ing a course in genetics, nutrition, gen- 
eral animal physiology, microbiology 
and animal production or management 
should plan to take such a course early 
in their graduate program. 

Ph.D. students entenng from other in- 
stitutions with the Masters or entering di- 
rectly into the Ph.D. program are ex- 
pected to meet the requirements indi- 
cated above. Two additional credits in 
the program seminar are required. The 
M.S. is not a prerequisite for admission 
to Ph.D. study: however, most students 
find it advantageous. Students usually 
complete the Ph.D. in two years after 
the M.S. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

Faculty in the program are an outstand- 
ing group representing research accom- 
plished in a wide variety of related fields. 
Excellent supporting courses in physi- 
ology, biochemistry and microbiology 
are available in the appropriate depart- 
ments. Courses in biometrics listed in 
the catalog under AGRI provide a strong 
background in experimental design and 
statistical analysis. The Computer Sci- 
ence Center offers courses in program- 
ming and computer language, as well 
as facilities for the statistical analysis of 
thesis data. 

Outstanding laboratory facilities are 
available in the Animal Sciences Center 
which include the combined resources 
of the Departments of Animal, Dairy and 
Veterinary Science. Instrumentation is 
available to graduate students for gas- 
lipid chromatography, atomic absorp- 
tion spectrophotometry, automated cal- 
orimetry, electron microscopy, liquid scin- 
tillation radioactivity measurements, 
electrophoresis, ultra centrifugation and 
a variety of microbiological techniques. 
Controlled environment facilities in the 
Center permit work with laboratory ani- 
mals and detailed experiments on larger 
animals. A gnotobiotic laboratory is 
available and currently being used in 
ruminent nutrition research. Excellent 
surgical facilities are available for re- 
search in the areas of reproductive and 
nutritional physiology. 

Herds and flocks of beef cattle, dairy 
cattle, horses, sheep and swine are 
readily available for graduate research. 
Limited numbers of experiments can be 
conducted on the campus with large an- 
imals. Experiments requihng large num- 



Graduate Programs / 55 



bers of animals are carried out at one of 
four outlying farms. 

A cooperative agreement with the Ag- 
ricultural Research Service at nearby 
Beltsville, Maryland (BARC) makes 
available laboratory, animal and re- 
search personnel resources of impor- 
tance in the graduate program. 

A dairy product processing facility is 
available for dairy product research. 

In addition to excellent library facilities 
on the Campus, the National Agricul- 
tural Library, the National Library of 
Medicine and the Library of Congress, 
all located within 10 miles, constitute 
the best library resource for graduate 
study available anywhere. 

Financial Assistance 

A number of Graduate Assistantships 
are available and awarded to students 
presenting strong academic records 
and a capability and motivation to per- 
form well in teaching or research assign- 
ments. 

Additional Information 

For specific information on the Program, 
admission procedures or financial aid, 
contact: 
Dr. R. F. Davis, Chairman 
Department of Dairy Science 

Courses 

ANSC 401 Fundamentals of Nutrition. (3) 

Three lectures per week. Prerequisite, 
CHEM 104; ANSC 212 recommended. A 
study of the fundamental role of all nutrients 
in the body including ttieir digestion, absorp- 
tion and metabolism. Dietary requirements 
and nutritional deficiency syndromes of labo- 
ratory and farm animals and man will be con- 
sidered. 

ANSC 402 Applied Animal Nutrition. (3) 

Two lectures and one laboratory penod per 
week. Prerequisites, MATH 110, ANSC 401 
or permission of instructor. A critical study of 
those factors which influence the nutritional 
requirements of ruminants, swine and poul- 
try. Practical feeding methods and proce- 
dures used in formulation of economically ef- 
ficient rations will be presented. 

ANSC 403 Applied Animal Nutrition. (3) 

Two lectures and one laboratory period per 
week Prerequisites, IVIATH 1 10, ANSC 402 
or permission of instructor. A critical study of 
those factors which influence the nutritional 
requirements of ruminants, swine and poul- 
try. Practical feeding methods and proce- 
dures used in formulation of economically ef- 
ficient rations will be presented. 

ANSC 406 Environmental Physiology. (3) 

Prerequisites, anatomy and physiology. The 
specific anatomical and physiological modifi- 
cations employed by animals adapted to cer- 
tain stressful environments will be con- 
sidered Particular emphasis will be placed 
on the problems of temperature regulation 
and water balance Specific areas for con- 
sideration will include: animals in cold (includ- 



ing hibernation), animals in dry heat, diving 
animals and animals in high altitudes. 

ANSC 407 Advanced Dairy Production. (1) 

An advanced course primarily designed for 
teachers of vocational agriculture and county 
agents. It includes a study of the newer dis- 
coveries in dairy cattle nutrition, breeding and 
management. 

ANSC 41 1 Biology and Management of 
Shellfish. (4) Two lectures and two three- 
hour laboratory periods each week. Field 
trips. Identification, biology, management, 
and culture of commercially-important mol- 
luscs and Crustacea. Prerequisite, one year 
of biology or zoology. This course will ex- 
amine the shellfisheries of the world, but will 
emphasize those of the Northwestern Atlan- 
tic Ocean and Chesapeake Bay. 

ANSC 412 Introduction to Diseases of Ani- 
mals. (3) Prerequisite, MICB 200 and ZOOL 
101 . Two lectures and one laboratory period 
per week. This course gives basic instruction 
in the nature of disease; including causation, 
immunity, methods of diagnosis, economic 
importance, public health aspects and pre- 
vention and control of the common diseases 
of sheep, cattle, swine, horses and poultry. 

ANSC 413 Laboratory Animal Manage- 
ment. (3) A comprehensive course in care 
and management of laboratory animals. Em- 
phasis will be placed on physiology, anatomy 
and special uses for the different species. 
Disease prevention and regulations for main- 
taining animal colonies will be covered. Field 
trips will be required. 

ANSC 414 Biology and Management of 
Fish. (4) Prerequisite, one year of biology or 
zoology. Two lectures and two three-hour lab- 
oratories a week. Fundamentals of individual 
and population dynamics; theory and prac- 
tice of sampling fish populations; manage- 
ment schemes. 

ANSC 416 Wildlife Management. (3) Two 
lectures and one laboratory. An introduction 
to the interrelationships of game birds and 
mammals with their environment, population 
dynamics and the principles of wildlife man- 
agement. 

ANSC 422 Meats. (3) Two lectures and one 
laboratory period per week. Prerequisite, 
ANSC 221 . A course designed to give the 
basic facts about meat as a food and the fac- 
tors influencing acceptability, marketing, and 
quality of fresh meats. It includes compar- 
isons of characteristics of live animals with 
their carcasses, grading and evaluating car- 
casses as well as wholesale cuts, and the dis- 
thbution and merchandising of the nation's 
meat supply. Laboratory periods are con- 
ducted in packing houses, meat distribution 
centers, retail outlets and university meats 
laboratory. 

ANSC 423 Livestock Management. (3) 
One lecture and two laboratory periods per 
week. Prerequisite. ANSC 401. Application 
of various phases of animal science to the 
management and production of beef cattle, 
sheep and swine. 

ANSC 424 Livestock Management. (3) One 
lecture and two laboratory periods per week. 
Prerequisite, ANSC 423. Applications of var- 
ious phases of animal science to the manage- 
ment and production of beef cattle, sheep 
and swine. 



ANSC 425 Herpetology. (3) Prerequisites: 
ANSC 21 1 and ANSC 212; or equivalent. 
Study of taxonomy, physiology, behavior, 
functional anatomy, evolution and distribu- 
tion of present day amphibians and reptiles. 
Common diseases and management under 
captive conditions. Identification of poison- 
ous species with appropriate precautions. 

ANSC 426 Principles of Breeding. (3) Sec- 
ond semester. Three lectures per week. Pre- 
requisites, ANSC 201 or equivalent, ANSC 
222, ANSC 423 or 424. Graduate credit (1-3 
hours) allowed with permission of instructor. 
The practical aspects of animal breeding, her- 
edity, variation, selection, development, sys- 
tems of breeding and pedigree study are con- 
sidered. 

ANSC 432 Horse Farm Management (3) 
Prerequisite,, ANSC 332 and AREC 410. 
One 90-minute lecture and one four-hour lab- 
oratory period per week. A course to develop 
the technical and managenal skills necessary 
for the operation of a horse breeding farm. 
Herd health programs, breeding programs 
and procedures, foaling activities, foot care, 
weaning programs, and the maintenance of 
records incidental to each of these activities. 

ANSC 442 Dairy Cattle Breeding. (3) Two 

lectures and one laboratory period per week. 
Prerequisites, ANSC 242, and ANSC 201 . A 
specialized course in breeding dairy cattle. 
Emphasis is placed on methods of evaluation 
and selection, systems of breeding and 
breeding programs. 

ANSC 443 Physiology and Biochemistry 
of Lactation. (3) Prerequisites; ANSC 212 or 
equivalent and CHEM 261 or CHEM 461 . 
Three lectures per week. The physiology and 
biochemistry of milk production in domestic 
animals, particularly cattle. Mammary gland 
development and maintenance from the em- 
bryo to the fully developed lactating gland. Ab- 
normalities of the mammary gland. 

ANSC 444 Analysis of Dairy Production 
Systems. (3) Prerequisites, AGEC 406 and 
ANSC 203 or 214, or permission of instructor. 
The business aspects of dairy farming includ- 
ing an evaluation of the costs and returns as- 
sociated with each segment. The economic 
impact of pertinent management decisions is 
studied. Recent developments in animal nuth- 
tion and genetics, agricultural economics, agri- 
cultural engineering, and agronomic prac- 
tices are discussed as they apply to manage- 
ment of a dairy herd. 

ANSC 446 Physiology of Mammalian Re- 
production. (3) Prerequisite; ZOOL 422 or 
ANSC 212. Anatomy and physiology of repro- 
ductive processes in domesticated and wild 
mammals. 

ANSC 447 Physiology of Mammalian Re- 
production Laboratory. (1) Pre- or corequi- 
sites; ANSC 446. One three-hour laboratory 
per week. Animal handling, artificial Insem- 
ination procedures and analytical techniques 
useful in animal management and repro- 
ductive research. Not open to students who 
have credit for ANSC 446 prior to fall 1976. 

ANSC 452 Avian Physiology. (2) (Alternate 
even years) one three-hour laboratory period 
per week. Prerequisites, a basic course in ani- 
mal physiology. The basic physiology of the 
bird is discussed, excluding the reproductive 
system. Special emphasis is given to physio- 



56 / Graduate Programs 



logical differences between birds and other 
vertebrates. 

ANSC 462 Physiology of Hatchability. (1) 

Two lectures and one laboratory period per 
week. Prerequisite. ZOOL 421 or 422. The 
ptiysiology of embryonic development as re- 
lated to principles of tiatctiability and prob- 
lems of incubation encountered in the hatch- 
ery industry are discussed. 

ANSC 463 Nutrition Laboratory. (2) Pre- 
requisite, ANSC/NUSC 401 or concurrent 
registration. Six hours of laboratory per week. 
Digestibility studies with ruminant and mono- 
gastnc animals, proximate analysis of var- 
ious food products, and feeding trials demon- 
strating classical nutntional deficiencies in lab- 
oratory animals, 

ANSC 464 Poultry Hygiene. (3) Two lec- 
tures and one laboratory period per week. 
Prerequisites, MICB 200 and ANSC 101. Vi- 
rus, bacterial and protozoan diseases, par- 
asitic diseases, prevention, control and eradi- 
cation, 

ANSC 466 Avian Anatomy. (3) Two lectures 
and one laboratory period per week Pre- 
requisite, ZOOL 102. Gross and microscopic 
structure, dissection and demonstration. 

ANSC 467 Poultry Breeding and Feeding. 

(1) This course is designed primarily for 
teachers of vocational agnculture and exten- 
sion service workers. The first half will be de- 
voted to problems concerning breeding and 
the development of breeding stock. The sec- 
ond half will be devoted to nutrition. 

ANSC 477 Poultry Products and Market- 
ing. (1) This course is designed primanly for 
teachers of vocational agriculture and county 
agents. It deals with the factors affecting the 
quality of poultry products and with hatchery 
management problems, egg and poultry grad- 
ing, preservation problems and market out- 
lets for Maryland poultry. 

ANSC 480 Special Topics in Fish and Wild- 
life Management. (3) Three lectures. Analy- 
sis of various state and federal programs re- 
lated to fish and wildlife management. This 
would include: Fish stocking programs. Mary- 
land deer management program, warm water 
fish management, acid drainage problems, 
water quality, water fowl management, wild 
turkey management and regulations relative 
to the administration of these programs. 

ANSC 487 Special Topics in Animal Sci- 
ence. (1) Prerequisite, permission of instruc- 
tor. This course is designed pnmarily for 
teachers of vocational agriculture and exten- 
sion service personnel. One primary topic to 
be selected mutually by the instructor and stu- 
dents will be presented each session. 

ANSC 601 Advanced Ruminant Nutrition. 

(2) First semester. One one-hour lecture and 
one-three hour laboratory per week. Prerequi- 
site, permission of instructor. Physiological, 
microbiological and biochemical aspects of 
the nutrition of ruminants as compared to 
other animals. 

ANSC 603 Mineral Metabolism. (3) Second 
semester. Two lectures per week. Prerequi- 
sites. CHEM 481 and 463. The role of min- 
erals in metabolism of animals and man. Top- 
ics to be covered include the role of minerals 
in energy metabolism, bone structure, electro- 
lyte balance, and as catalysts. 



ANSC 604 Vitamin Nutrition. (3) Prerequi- 
sites, ANSC 401 and CHEM 461 . Two one- 
hour lectures and one two-hour discussion 
penod per week. Advanced study of the fun- 
damental role of vitamins and vitamin-like co- 
factors in nutntion including chemical proper- 
ties, absorption, metabolism, excretion and 
deficiency syndromes. A critical study of the 
biochemical basis of vitamin function, interre- 
lationship of vitamins with other substances 
and of certain laboratory techniques. 

ANSC 610 Electron Microscopy. (4) First 
and second semesters Two lectures and two 
laboratory penods per week. Prerequisites, 
permission of instructor. Theory of electron 
microscopy, electron optics, specimen prep- 
aration and technique, operation of elec- 
tron photography, interpretation of electron 
images, related instruments and techniques 

ANSC 612 Energy Nutrition. (2) Second 
semester. Prerequisites, ANSC 402 or NUSC 
450, CHEM 461, or consent of instructor. One 
lecture, one 2 hour laboratory per week. 
Basic concepts of animal energetics with 
quantitative descriptions of energy require- 
ments and utilization. 

ANSC 614 Proteins. (2) Second semester 
One lecture and one 2 hour laboratory per 
week. Prerequisites. ANSC 402 and CHEM 
461 or consent of instructor. Advanced study 
of the roles of ammo acids in nutrition and 
metabolism. Protein digestion, absorption, 
anabolism, catabolism and ammo acid bal- 
ance. 

ANSC 622 Advanced Breeding (2) Second 
semester, alternate years. Two lectures a 
week. Prerequisites, ANSC 426 or equiva- 
lent, and biological statistics. This course 
deals with the more technical phases of her- 
edity and variation, selection indices, breed- 
ing systems, and inheritance in farm animals. 

ANSC 641 Experimental Mammalian Sur- 
gery I. (2) First semester. Prerequisite, per- 
mission of instructor. A course presenting the 
fundamentals of anesthesia and the art of ex- 
perimental surgery, especially to obtain re- 
search preparations. 

ANSC 642 Experimental Mammalian Sur- 
gery II. (3) Second semester. Prerequisites, 
ANSC 641. Permission of instructor. A 
course emphasizing advanced surgical prac- 
tices to obtain research preparations, cardio- 
vascular surgery and chronic vascularly iso- 
lated organ techniques, experience with 
pump oxygenator systems, profound hypo- 
thermia, hemodialysis, infusion systems, im- 
plantation and transplantation procedures 
are taught, 

ANSC 643 Research Methods. (3) First 
semester. One lecture and two laboratory pe- 
nods per week. Prerequisite, permission of 
instructor. The application of biochemical, 
physio-chemical and statistical methods to 
problems in biological research. 

ANSC 660 Poultry Literature. (1-4) First 
and second semesters. Readings on individ- 
ual topics are assigned. Wntten reports re- 
quired. Methods of analysis and presentation 
of scientific material are discussed. 

ANSC 661 Physiology of Reproduction. 

(3) First semester. Two lectures and one lab- 
oratory period a week. Prerequisite, ANSC 
212 or its equivalent. The role of the en- 



docnnes in reproduction is considered. Fertil- 
ity, sexual matunty, egg formation, ovulation, 
and the physiology of oviposition are studied. 
Comparative processes in birds and mam- 
mals are discussed. 

ANSC 663 Advanced Nutrition Labora- 
tory. (3) Prerequisite, ANSC/NUSC 401 : 
and either CHEM 462 or NUSC 670. One 
hour of lecture and six hours of laboratory per 
week. Basic instrumentation and techniques 
desired for advanced nutntional research. 
The effect of various nutntional parameters 
upon intermediary metabolism, enzyme ki- 
netics, endocrinology, and nutrient absorp- 
tion in laboratory animals 

ANSC 665 Physiological Genetics of Do- 
mestic Animals. (2) Second semester. Two 
lectures per week. Prerequisites, a course in 
basic genetics and biochemistry. The under- 
lying physiological basis for genetic differ- 
ences in production traits and selected mor- 
phological traits will be discussed Inhen- 
tance of enzymes, protein polymorphisms 
and physiological traits will be studied. 

ANSC 677 Advanced Animal Adaptations 
to the Environment. (2) First semester. Two 
lectures or discussions per week. Prerequi- 
sites: ANSC 406. or permission of instructor. 
A detailed consideration of certain anatomi- 
cal and physiological modifications employed 
by mammals adapted to cold, dry heat or alti- 
tude. Each student will submit for discussion 
a library paper concerning a specific adapta- 
tion to an environmental stress. 

ANSC 686 Veterinary Bacteriology and 
Mycology. (3) Prerequisites: ANSC 412 and 
MICB 440. Two lectures and one two-hour 
laboratory period per week. Bactenal and 
mycotic diseases of domestic animals will be 
considered. Emphasis will be given to culture 
and differentiation of the micro-organisms, 
their pathogenic properties, epizootiology, 
mode of transmission, disease prevention 
and chemotherapy. 

ANSC 687 Veterinary Virology. (3) Pre- 
requisite: MICB 460. A detailed study of virus 
and nckettsial diseases of domestic and lab- 
oratory animals. Emphasis on viruses of vet- 
erinary importance along with techniques for 
their propagation, charactenzation and identi- 
fication, 

ANSC 690 Seminar in Population Genet- 
ics of Domestic Animals. (3) Second se- 
mester. Prerequisites, ZOOL 246 and AGRI 
401 or their equivalents. Current literature 
and research dealing with the pnnciples of 
population genetics as they apply to breeding 
and selection programs for the genetic im- 
provement of domestic animals, population 
structure, estimation of genetic parameters, 
correlated characters, pnnciples and meth- 
ods of selection, relationship and systems of 
mating, 

ANSC 698 Seminar. (1) First and second se- 
mesters. Students are required to prepare 
papers based upon current scientific publica- 
tions relating to animal science, or upon their 
research work, for presentation before and 
discussion by the class: (1) recent advances; 
(2) nutrition: (3) physiology: (4) biochemistry, 

ANSC 699 Special Problems in Animal Sci- 
ence. (1-2) First and second semesters. 
Work assigned in proportion to amount of 
credit. Prerequisite, approval of staff, Prob- 

Graduate Programs / 57 



lems will be assigned which relate specifically 
to the character of work the student is pursu- 
ing. 

ANSC 799 Master's Thesis Research. (1-6) 
ANSC 899 Doctoral Dissertation Re- 
search. (1-8) 



Applied Mathematics 
Program 

Professor and Director Rheinboldt 

Professors: Almon (ECON), Antman 
(MATH), Banerjee (PHYS), Brill (PHYS), 
Cadman (CHE), Cunniff(ME), Davidson 
(PHYS), Davisson (EE), DeClaris (EE), 
Dorfnnan (IPST), Douglis (H/IATH), Dragt 
(PHYS), Edmundson (CMSC), Falier 
(IPST), Ferrell (PHYS), Gass (B&M), 
Glasser (PHYS), Greenberg (PHYS), 
Griffin (PHYS), Harger (EE), Hummel 
(IVIATH), R.L. Johnson (MATH), Kanal 
(CMSC), Kelejian (ECON), MacDonald 
(PHYS), Mikulski (MATH), Minker (CMSC), 
Misner (PHYS), Newcomb (EE), Osborn 
(MATH), Pearl (MATH), Prange (PHYS), 
Stellmacher (MATH), Sternberg (CE), 
Strauss (MATH), Sucher (PHYS), Taylor 
(EE), Weiss (EE), Wolfe (MATH), Woo 
PHYS). Yang (ME) 

Associate Professors: Berenstein (MATH), 
Betancourt (ECON), Cooper (MATH), 
Donaldson (AERO), Ephremides (EE), 
Fivel (PHYS), Fromovitz(B&M), Garber 
(CE), Gentry (CHE), Glick (PHYS), Hall 
(CE), Jones (AERO), Kim (PHYS), 
Korenman (PHYS), Marks (ME), 
Pfaffenberger (B&M), Plotkin (AERO), 
Sather (MATH), Schaeffer (AERO), 
Schneider (MATH), Sheaks (CHE), Sweet 
(MATH), Vandergraft (CMSC), Walston 
(ME), Widhelm (B&M) 

Assistant Professors: Agrawala (CMSC), 
Baras (EE), Basili (CMSC), Fitzpatrick 
(MATH), C.R. Johnson (IPST), Kedem 
(MATH), Kirby (MATH), Liu (MATH), 
McClellan (CMSC), Stewart (CMSC) 

Researcti Professors: Babuska (IPST), 
Hubbard (IPST), G.S., Jones (IPST), 
Karlovitz (IPST), Kellogg (IPST), 
Lashinsky (IPST), Olver (IPST), Yorke 
(IPST), Zwanzig (IPST) 

The Interdisciplinary Applied Math- 
ematics Program offers the degrees of 
Master of Arts and Doctor of Philosophy, 
These are awarded for graduate study 
and research in mathematics and its 
applications in the engineering, physi- 
cal, and social sciences. In addition, the 
Applied Mathematics Program offers 
certified minors in applied mathematics 
for graduate students not enrolled in the 
Program. 

The Program is administratively affil- 
iated with the Department of Math- 
ematics. In particular, under this ar- 
rangement the Department of Math- 
ematics assumes the respnsibility for 
the administration of the applied math- 
ematics courses under the MAPL label. 
Moreover, the Graduate Office of the 

58 / Graduate Programs 



Department maintains the 
records of all students in the Applied 
Mathematics Program and handles cor- 
respondence with those applying for ad- 
mission. However, it is important that 
any application for admission indicates 
clearly whether a student wishes to 
enter the Mathematics (MATH) or the 
Applied Mathematics (MAPL) Program. 
The faculty considers the primary aim 
of applied mathematics to be the under- 
standing of a wide spectrum of scientific 
phenomena through the use of math- 
ematical ideas, methods, and tech- 
niques. The applied mathematician 
should be both a mathematical special- 
ist and a versatile scientist, whose 
interests and motivations derive from a 
strong desire to confront highly complex 
or descriptive situations with math- 
ematical analysis and ideas. In line with 
this, at least half of the required work 
is expected to be in courses with primar- 
ily mathematical content, and the re- 
maining part has to include a coherent 
set of courses in some field of applica- 
tion outside of the usual mathematics 
curriculum. Some of the areas currently 
pursued by graduate students in the 
Program are various areas of physics, 
information structures, meteorology, 
operations research, pattern recogni- 
tion, structural mechanics, and systems 
and control theory. Many other areas 
of study are available through the par- 
ticipating departments. It may also be 
noted that the faculty includes a strong 
group in numerical analysis and that 
many students include courses on 
numerical and scientific computing in 
their programs. 

Admission and Degree Information 

In addition to the general requirements 
of the Graduate School, applicants for 
admission to graduate study in the Pro- 
gram should have completed, with at 
least a B average (3.0 on a 4.0 scale), 
an undergraduate program of study 
which includes a strong emphasis on 
mathematics. The student's general 
ability for graduate study in the Program 
and mathematical capabilities will be 
determined from his or her record or by 
special examination. 

A mathematical preparation with 
grades of B or better at least through the 
level of advanced calculus in a school of 
good academic standing will normally 
be considered sufficient demonstration 
of the required mathematical back- 
ground. Previous education in some 
part of an applicant's area, such as 



physics, one of the engineering disci- 
plines, economics, etc., and a basic 
competence in computational tech- 
niques will be favorably considered in a 
student's application for admission to 
the Program, although this is not a pre- 
requisite. 

When a student has decided upon an 
area of specialization, a study advisory 
committee is appointed by the Director of 
the Program. This committee, working 
together with the student, is responsible 
for formulating a course of study leading 
toward the degree sought. This course 
of study must constitute a unified, co- 
herent program in an acceptable field of 
specialization of applied mathematics 
and must meet with the approval of the 
Graduate Committee for Applied Math- 
ematics. 

Besides any other requirements spec- 
ified by the Graduate School, the fol- 
lowing specific conditions must be met 
for an M.A. degree in Applied Math- 
ematics: 

(1) At least 12 of the 24 required 
course credits for the M.A. degree with 
thesis are in courses with primarily math- 
ematical content selected from a list of 
such courses maintained by the Gradu- 
ate Committee for Applied Mathematics. 
At least 6 of these 12 credits are on the 
600-800 level. At least 3 of the 1 2 credits 
are in a course on numerical analysis. 
At least 1 of the 12 credits is in an ap- 
proved applied mathematics seminar. 

(2) The 24 required course credits in- 
clude either 6 credits at the 600-800 
level, or alternately, 9 credits of which 3 
are at the 600-800 level, in courses 
whose content is phmarily in the stu- 
dent's chosen field(s) of application. 

No course may be used to meet the 
requirements under both (1) and (2) 
above. 

(1) At least 15 of the 30 required 
course credits for the non-thesis 
master's option are in courses with pri- 
marily mathematical content selected 
from a list of courses maintained by the 
Graduate Committee for Applied Math- 
ematics. At least 9 of these 15 credits 
are in a course on numerical analysis. 
At least 1 of the 15 credits is in an 
approved applied mathematics seminar. 

(2) The 30 required course credits in- 
clude either 6 credits at the 600-800 
level, or, alternately, 9 credits of which 3 
are at the 600-800 level, in courses 
whose content is primarily in the stu- 
dent's chosen field(s) of application. 

No course may be used to meet the 



requirements under both (1) and (2) 
above. 

The student must pass the compre- 
hensive examination for the M.A. de- 
gree with thesis. The examination con- 
sists of at least three parts, with at least 
one of the parts in a mathematics area, 
and at least one of the parts in an area of 
application. The parts shall be taken as 
closely together as possible. 

The student In the doctoral program 
must take a minimum of 36 hours of 
courses exclusive of dissertation re- 
search. At least 27 of these 36 credits 
are at the 600-800 level. 

A transfer of at most 27 credits of 
graduate-level work taken at a regionally 
accredited Institution before admission 
to the Ph.D. Program Is permitted pro- 
viding that (1) the Graduate Committee 
for Applied Mathematics has approved 
the transfer; (2) a grade of B or better 
was earned in the courses taken (no 
courses with pass/fail grades will be 
accepted); (3) the credit was earned 
within the time limits Imposed for com- 
pleting the Ph.D. degree at the University 
of Maryland. 

Course Distribution: 1) at least 18 of 
the required 36 credits are In courses 
with primarily mathematical content 
selected from a list of such courses 
maintained by the Graduate Committee 
for Applied Mathematics. At least 9 of 
these 1 8 credits are on the 600-800 
level. At least 3 of the 18 credits are In 
numerical analysis. At least 2 of the 18 
credits are in approved applied math- 
ematics seminars. 2) The 36 credits in- 
clude either 6 credits at the 600-800 
level or alternately 9 credits of which 3 
are at the 600-800 level, In courses 
whose content Is primarily in the stu- 
dent's chosen field(s) of application. 
3) No course may be used to meet the 
requirements under both items (1) and 
(2) above. 

The student must pass the Compre- 
hensive Examination for the Ph.D. The 
examination consists of at least three 
parts, with at least one of the parts in an 
area of mathematics, and at least one of 
the parts In an area of application. The 
parts shall be taken as closely together 
as possible. 

In addition, the student must pass the 
Candidacy Examination for the Ph.D. 
degree. The Candidacy Examination is 
an oral examination which serves as a 
test of the detailed preparation of a stu- 
dent in the area of specialization and 
seeks to discover if he or she has a deep 
enough understanding to carry out the 



proposed research. The examination 
assumes further advanced course work 
beyond the Comprehensive Exam- 
ination. 

The Applied Mathematics Program 
offers certified minors in applied math- 
ematics to regular graduate students 
who are enrolled In a graduate degree 
program of the University of Maryland 
other than the Program itself. The suc- 
cessful completion of the requirements 
for such a minor will be recorded In the 
student's transcripts. Moreover, a num- 
ber of departments participating In the 
Applied Mathematics Program permit 
the requirements for the certified minor 
to replace part of the degree require- 
ments of the major department. 

A student wishing to pursue a certified 
minor In applied mathematics must fill 
out an application form for participation 
In the Certified Minor Program. Such 
forms are available from the office of the 
Director of the Applied Mathematics Pro- 
gram. 

The Certified Minor Program at the 
Master's level must contain at least 
either 6 semester hours In 400-level 
courses and 3 semester hours in 600- 
level courses, or 6 semester hours in 
600-level courses. At the doctoral level 
the Certified Minor Program must con- 
tain at least 9 semester hours of grad- 
uate credit, of which at most 3 hours 
may be on the 400 level. 

Courses 

MAPL 460 Computational Methods (3) Pre- 
requisites: Math 240, 241. and CMSC 110, 
or equivalent. Basic computational methods 
for interpolation, least squares, approx- 
imation, numerical quadrature, numencal 
solution of polynomial and transcendental 
equations, systems of linear equations and 
initial value problems for ordinary differential 
equations. Emphasis on the methods and 
their computational properties rather than on 
their analytic aspects, (listed also as CMSC 
460.) 

MAPL 470 Numerical Mathematics: Anal- 
ysis (3) Prerequisites: Math 240 and 241 : 
CMSC 1 10 or equivalent. This course with 
MAPL/CMSC 471 . forms a one-year intro- 
duction to numerical analysis at the advanced 
undergraduate level. Interpolation, numerical 
differentiation and integration, solution of non- 
linear equations, acceleration of conver- 
gence, numerical treatment of differential 
equations. Topics will be supplemented with 
programming assignments, (listed also as 
CMSC 470.) 

MAPL 471 Numerical Mathematics: Linear 
Algebra (3) Prerequisites: Math 240 and 
Math 241 : CMSC 1 10 or equivalent. The 
course, with MAPL/CMSC 470, forms a one- 
year introduction to numerical analysis at the 
advanced undergraduate level. Direct solution 



of linear systems, nonns, least squares prob- 
lems, the symmetric eigenvalue problem, 
basic Iterative methods. Topics will be sup- 
plemented with programming assignments, 
(listed also as CMSC 471.) 

MAPL 477 Optimization (3) Prerequisite: 
CMSC 1 10 and MATH 405 or MATH 474. 
Linear Programming including the simplex 
algorithm and dual linear programs, convex 
sets and elements of convex programming, 
combinatorial optimization integer program- 
ming. (Listed also as CMSC 477.) 

MAPL 498 Selected Topics in Applied 
Mathematics (1-3) Prerequisite: Permission 
of the instructor. Topics in applied mathe- 
matics of special interest to advance under- 
graduate students. May be repeated to a 
maximum of six credits if the subject matter 
is different. 

MAPL 600 Advanced Linear Numerical 
Analysis. (3) Prerequisites: MAPL 470. 471 
and MATH 405 or MATH 474: or consent of 
instructor. Advanced topics in numencal lin- 
ear algebra, such as dense eigenvalue prob- 
lems, sparse elimination, iterative methods, 
and other topics. (Same as CMSC 770). 

MAPL 604 Numerical Solution of Nonlin- 
ear Equations. (3) Prerequisites: MAPL 470, 
471 and MATH 410: or consent of instructor. 
Numerical solution of nonlinear equations in 
one and several variables. Existence ques- 
tions. Minimization methods. Selected appli- 
cations. (Same as CMSC 772.) 

MAPL 607 Advanced Numerical Optimiza- 
tion. (3) Prerequisites: MATH 410 and 
MAPL/CMSC 477: or equivalent. Modem Nu- 
merical methods for solving unconstrained 
and constrained nonlinear optimization prob- 
lems in finite dimensions. Design of compu- 
tational algorithms and on the analysis of 
their properties. 

MAPL 610 Numerical Solution of Ordinary 
Differential Equations. (3) Prerequisites: 
MAPL/CMSC 470 and MATH 414: or con- 
sent of instructor. Methods for solving initial 
value problems in ordinary differential equa- 
tions. Single step and multi-step methods, 
stability and convergence, adaptive methods. 
Shooting methods tor boundary value prob- 
lems. 

MAPL 610 Numerical Solution of Ordinary 
Differential Equations. (3) Prerequisites: 
MAPL/CMSC 470 and MATH 414: or con- 
sent of instructor. Methods for solving initial 
value problems in ordinary differential equa- 
tions. Single step and multi-step methods, 
stability and convergence, adaptive methods. 
Shooting methods for boundary value prob- 
lems. 

MAPL 612 Numerical Methods in Partial 
Differential Equations. (3) Prerequisites: 
Concurrent registration in MATH/MAPL 680 
or in MAPL 650; or consent of the instructor. 
Introduction to problems and methodologies 
of the solution of partial differential equations. 
Finite difference methods for elliptic, para- 
bolic, and hyperbolic equations, first order 
systems, and eigenvalue problems. Varia- 
tional formulation of elliptic problems. The 
finite element method and its relation to finite 
difference methods. 

MAPL 814 Mathematics of the Finite Ele- 
ment Method. (3) Prerequisites: Concurrent 



Graduate Programs / 59 



registration in MATH/MAPL 681 or in MATH/ 
MAPL 685; or MAPL 612 and consent of 
instructor. Variational formulations of linear 
and nonlinear elliptic boundary value prob- 
lems; formulation of the finite element meth- 
od; construction of finite element subspaces; 
error estimates; eigenvalue problems; time 
dependent problems. 

MAPL 640 System Theory. (3) IVIodeling of 
systems, abstract definition of state, linearity 
and its implications, linear differential sys- 
tems, controllability and observability, im- 
pulse response, transfer functions, realiza- 
tion theory, nonlinear differential systems, 
definitions of stability, Lyapunov stability 
theory, input/output stability, frequency 
domain stability conditions. (Listed also as 
ENEE 663.) 

MAPL 644 Estimation and Detection 
Theory. (3) Prerequisite; ENEE 620 or equiv- 
alent or consent of instructor. Estimation of 
unknown parameters, Cramer-Rao lovi^er 
bound; Optimum (IVIAP) demodulation; filter- 
ing, amplitude and angle modulation, com- 
parison with conventional systems; statistical 
decision theory; Bayes, IVIinimax, Neyman/ 
Pearson, critena-68 simple and composite 
hypotheses; application to coherent and in- 
coherent signal detection; M-ARY hypothesis; 
application to uncoded and coded digital 
communication systems. (Listed also as 
ENEE 621.) 

MAPL 650 Advanced Mathematics for the 
Physical Sciences I. (3) Prerequisites; MATH 
240 and 410. Effective analytic methods for 
the study of linear and nonlinear equations 
that arise in the physical sciences; algebraic 
equations, integral equations and ordinary 
differential equations. (Not open to graduate 
students in MATH or MAPL without special 
permission from their advisor.) 

MAPL 651 Advanced Mathematics for the 
Physical Sciences II. (3) Prerequisite: MAPL 
650. Continuation of MAPL 650. Partial dif- 
ferential equations; linear and nonlinear 
eigenvalue problems (Not open to graduate 
students in MATH or MAPL without special 
permission from their advisor.) 

MAPL 655 Asymptotic Analysis and Spe- 
cial Function I. (3) Prerequisite; MATH 413 
or MATH 463. Transcendental equations. 
Gamma function, orthogonal polynomials, 
Bessel functions, integral transforms, 
Watson's lemma, Laplace's method, station- 
ary phase, analytic theory of ordinary differ- 
ential equations, Liouville-Green (or WKBJ) 
approximation. (Same as MATH 655.) 

MAPL 656 Asymptotic Analysis and Spe- 
cial Functions II. (3) Prerequisite; MATH/ 
MAPL 655, Steepest descents, coalescing 
saddle-points, singular integral equations, 
irregular singularities, Bessel, hypergeomet- 
ric, and Legendre functions, Euler-Maclaurin 
formula. Darboux's method, turning points, 
phase shift. (Same as MATH 656.) 

MAPL 670 Ordinary Differential Equations 

I. (3) Prerequisites; MATH 405 and 410 or the 
equivalent. Existence and uniqueness, linear 
systems usually with Floquet theory for pe- 
riodic systems, linearization and stability, pla- 
nar systems usually with Poincare-Bendixson 
theorem. (Same as MATH 670.) 

MAPL 671 Ordinary Differential Equations 

II. (3) Prerequisites; MATH 630 and MATH/ 

60 / Graduate Programs 



MAPL 670 or equivalent. The content of this 
course varies with the interests of the instruc- 
tor and the class. Stability theory, control, time 
delay systems, Hamiltonian systems, bifur- 
cation theory, and boundary value problems. 
(Same as MATH 671.) 

MAPL 673 Classical Methods in Partial 
Differential Equations I. (3) Prerequisite; 
MATH 410 or equivalent. Cauchy problem 
for the wave equation and heat equation, 
Dirichlet and Neumann problem for Laplace's 
equation. Classification of equations, Cauchy- 
Kowaleski theorem. General second order 
linear and nonlinear elliptic and parabolic 
equations. (Same as MATH 673.) 

MAPL 674 Classical Methods in Partial 
Differential Equations II. (3) Prerequisite; 
MATH/MAPL 673. General theory of first 
order partial differential equations, charac- 
teristics, complete integrals, Hamilton-Jacobi 
theory. Hyperbolic systems in two indepen- 
dent vanables, existence and uniqueness, 
shock waves, applications to compressible 
flow. (Same as MATH 674.) 

MAPL 680 Eigenvalue and Boundary Value 
Problems I (3) Prerequisite; MATH 405 and 
410 or equivalent. Operational methods ap- 
plied to ordinary differential equations. Intro- 
duction to linear spaces, compact operators 
in Hilbert space, study of eigenvalues. (Same 
as MATH 680.) 

MAPL 681 Eigenvalue and Boundary Value 
Problems II. (3) Prerequisite; MATH/MAPL 
680. Boundary value problems for linear dif- 
ferential equations. Method of energy inte- 
grals applied to Laplace's equation, heat 
equation and the wave equation. Study of 
eigenvalues. (Same as MATH 681.) 

MAPL 685 Modern Methods in Partial Dif- 
ferential Equations I. (3) Prerequisite; MATH 
630 and 631. Space of distributions, fourier 
transforms, concept of weak and strong solu- 
tions. Existence, uniqueness and regularity 
theory for elliptic and parabolic problems 
using methods of functional analysis. (Same 
as MATH 685.) 

MAPL 686 Modern Methods in Partial Dif- 
ferential Equations II. (3) Prerequisite; 
MATH/MAPL 685. Emphasis on nonlinear 
problems. Sobolev embedding theorems, 
methods of monotonicity, compactness, appli- 
cations to elliptic, parabolic and hyperbolic 
problems. (Same as MATH 686.) 

MAPL 698 Advanced Topics in Applied 
Mathematics. (1-4) Prerequisite: Consent of 
instructor. Repeatable if topic differs. 

MAPL 699 Applied Mathematics Seminar. 
(1-3) Prerequisite; Consent of instructor. 
Seminar to acquaint students with a variety 
of applications of mathematics and to de- 
velop skills in presentation techniques. Re- 
peatable if topic differs. 

MAPL 701 Introduction to Continuum 
Mechanics. (3) Prerequisite; Consent of in- 
structor. Background from algebra and ge- 
ometry, kinematics of deformation. Stress 
equations of motion, thermodynamics of de- 
forming continua. Theory of constitutive re- 
lations. Materials with memory. Initial boun- 
dary value problems of nonlinear solid and 
fluid thermomechanics. Boundary value prob- 
lems of linear theories of solids and fluids. 



MAPL 710 Linear Elasticity. (3) Prerequi- 
site; MAPL 701 or consent of instructor. For- 
mulation of the equations. Compatability. 
uniqueness, existence, representation and 
qualitative behavior of solutions. Variational 
pnnciples. St. Venant beam problems, plane 
strain and plane stress, half-space protDlems, 
contact problems, vibration problems, wave 
propagation. Emphasis is placed on formula- 
tion and technique rather than on specific 
examples. 

MAPL 711 Non-linear Elasticity. (3) Pre- 
requisite; MAPL 701 , or consent of instructor. 
Formulation of initial boundary value prob- 
lems. Constitutive restrictions. Special solu- 
tions. Perturbation methods and their validity. 
Theories of rods and shells. Buckling and 
stability. Shock propagation. 

MAPL 720 Fluid Dynamics I. (3) Prerequi- 
site; Consent of instructor. A mathematical 
formulation and treatment of problems ans- 
ing in the theory of incompressible, compres- 
sible and viscous fluids. 

MAPL 721 Fluid Dynamics II. (3) Prerequi- 
site; Consent of instructor. A continuation of 
MAPL 720. 

MAPL 731 Information Theory. (3) Corequi- 
site; ENEE 620. Prerequisite; STAT 400 or 
equivalent. Information measure, entrophy, 
mutual information; source encoding; noise- 
less coding theorem, noisy coding theorem; 
exponential error bounds; introduction to pro- 
balistic error correcting codes, block and con- 
volutional codes and error bounds; channels 
with memory; continuous channels; rate dis- 
tortion function. (Same as ENNE 721,) 

MAPL 732 Coding Theory. (3) Prerequisite; 
ENNE 721 /MAPL 731 . Algebraic burst and 
random error correcting codes, convolutional 
encoding and sequential decoding, threshold 
decoding, concatenated codes, P-N se- 
quences, arithmetic codes. (Same as ENNE 
722.) 

MAPL 735 Mathematical Models in Esti- 
mation Theory. (3) Prerequisite; Back- 
ground in functional analysis, real analysis 
and random processes. Abstract measures, 
probability measures on function spaces, inte- 
gration; Markov processes, stochastic differ- 
ential equations, Ito's rule; Kalman-Bucy 
model; duality of estimation and control, 
singular detection, point processes; RKHS, 
linear theory, multiplicity representations; 
additional models and applications. (Same 
as ENNE 772.) 

MAPL 741 Control of Distributed Parameter 
Systems. (3) Prerequisite; An introductory 
course in functional analytic methods at the 
level of ENNE 760, and background in control 
and system theory. Study of systems gov- 
erned by partial differential equations. Delay 
systems. Boundary and distnbuted control, 
Lyapunov stability. Optimal control of sys- 
tems governed by partial differential equa- 
tions and of delay systems. Applicatons to 
continuum mechanics, distributed networks, 
biology, economics, and engineering. (Same 
as ENNE 761.) 

MAPL 742 Stochastic Control. (3) Prerequi- 
site; ENNE 620 or equivalent; and ENNE 
663/MAPL 640; or consent of the instructor. 
Stochastic control systems, numencal meth- 
ods for the Ricatti equation, the separation 
principle, control of linear systems with Gaus- 



sian signals and quadratic cost, nonlinear sto- 
chastic control, stockastic stability, introduc- 
tion to stochastic games. (Same as ENNE 
762.) 

MAPL 799 Master's Thesis Research (1-6) 

MAPL 899 Doctoral Dissertation Research 
(1-8) 



Art Program 

Professor and Chairman: Levitine 
Professors: Bunts. deLeins. Denny. Dnskell, 

Lynch. ManI, Rearick. 
Associate Professors: Campbell, DiFederico, 

Farquhar. Forbes. Gelman. Klank. Lapinski, 

Niese. Pemberton. 
Assistant Professors: DeMonte. Green. 

Hauptman. Johns. Reid. Spiro. Weigl. 

Wheelock. Withers. 

The Department of Art offers programs 
of graduate study leading to the degrees 
of Master of Arts in art history. Master of 
Fine Arts in studio art and Doctor of 
Philosophy in are history. Both disciplines, 
rooted in the concept of art as a human- 
istic experience, share an essential com- 
mon aim: the development of the students 
aesthetic sensitivity, understanding and 
knowledge. The major in art history is 
committed to the advanced study and 
scholarly interpretation of existing works 
of art. from the prehistonc era to the 
present, wfiile the studio major stresses 
the student's direct participation in the 
creation of works of art. 

Admission and Degree Information 

For admission to graduate study in stu- 
dio art, an undergraduate degree with 
an art major from an accredited college 
or university, or its equivalent, is required. 
The candidate should have approxi- 
mately 30 credit hours of undergraduate 
work in studio courses and 12 credit 
flours in art history courses. Other 
humanities area courses should be part 
of the candidates undergraduate prep- 
aration. In addition, special depart- 
mental requirements must be met. A 
candidate for the Master of Fine Arts 
degree will be required to pass an oral 
comprehensive examination, present 
an exhibition of his thesis work, write an 
abstract based on the thesis, and pre- 
sent an oral defense of the thesis. 

For admission to graduate study in art 
history, in addition to the approved under- 
graduate degree, or its equivalent, spe- 
cial departmental requirements must be 
met. Departmental requirements for the 
Master of Arts degree in Art History in- 
clude ARTH 692: reading knowledge of 
French or German (evidenced by an ex- 
amination administered by the Art De- 
partment): a written comprehensive ex- 



amination which tests the candidate s 
knowledge and comprehension of princi- 
pal areas and phases of art history: a the- 
sis which demonstrates competency in 
research and in original investigation by 
the candidate: and a final oral examina- 
tion on the thesis and the field which it 
represents. 

Requirements for the Doctor of Philos- 
ophy degree in Art History include ARTH 
692: reading knowledge of French and 
German: an oral examination and a written 
examination: a dissertation which demon- 
strates the candidate's capacity to per- 
form independent research in the field of 
art history: and a final oral examination 
on the dissertation and the field it repre- 
sents. 

Applicants are encouraged to sub- 
mit their applications by early March for 
entrance in the fall and by early October 
for entrance in Spring as the avail- 
able spaces are usually filled early. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

Each year the Department of Art partici- 
pates in the Middle Atlantic Symposium 
in the History of Art which is co-hosted 
by the National Gallery of Art and the 
University of Maryland. This symposium 
provides the opportunity for advanced 
graduate students from the member in- 
stitutions to present their research in a 
professional form. From time to time the 
Department of Art also publishes ab- 
stracts of the Symposium papers in 
Studies in Art fiistory presented at the 
twiddle Atlantic Symposium in tfie His- 
tory of Art. 

The University of Maryland is thirty- 
five minutes from the National Gallery, 
the National Collection of Fine Arts and 
Portrait Gallery, the Freer Gallery, the 
Corcoran Gallery, the Phillips Gallery, 
Dumbarton Oaks, the Hirshhorn Collec- 
tion. In Baltimore, forty-five minutes 
from the University, is the Museum of 
Art and the Walters Gallery. 

Financial Assistance 

A limited number of graduate assistant- 
ships are available in art. 

Additional Information 

Description of Departmental require- 
ments for the above programs and 
other information may be obtained from 
the Department of Art. 

For information on work leading to the 
degree of Master of Education in art ed- 
ucation, the student is referred to the 
section devoted to Secondary Educa- 
tion in this catalog. 



Courses 

Art Education 

ARTE 600 Advanced Problems in Art Edu- 
cation (3) 

ARTE 601 Advanced Problems In Art Edu- 
cation (3) 

ARTE 799 Master's Thesis Research (1-6) 

Art History 

ARTH 402 Classical Art (3) Architecture, 
sculpture and painting in the classical cul- 
tures. First semester will stress Greece. 

ARTH 403 Classical Art (3) Architecture, 

sculpture and painting in the classical cul- 
tures Second semester will stress Rome. 

ARTH 404 Bronze Age Art (3) An of the 

near east. Egypt and Aegean. 

ARTH 406 Arts of the East I (3) The arts 
of Japan and China from prehistory to 1400. 

ARTH 407 Arts of the East II (3) The arts 
of Japan and China from the 140O's to the 
present. 

ARTH 410 Early Christian - Early Byzantine 

Art (3) Sculpture, painting, architecture, and 
the minor arts from about 312 to 726 AD. 

ARTH 41 1 Byzantine Art: 726 - 1453 (3) 

Sculpture, painting, architecture and the minor 
arts from 726 to 1453 AD. 

ARTH 412 Medieval Art (3) Architecture, 
sculpture and painting in the middle ages. 
First semester will stress Romanesque. 

ARTH 413 Medieval Art (3) Architecture, 
sculpture and painting in the middle ages. 
Second semester will stress the Gothic period. 

ARTH 416 Northern European Painting 
in the 15th Century (3) Painting in the Neth- 
erlands. France and Germany. 

ARTH 417 Northern European Painting In 
the 16th Century (3) Painting in the Nether- 
lands. France and Germany. 

ARTH 422 Early Renaissance Art in Italy 

(3) Architecture, sculpture and painting from 
about 1400 to 1430. 

ARTH 423 Early Renaissance Art in Italy 

(3) Architecture, sculpture and painting from 
about 1430 to 1475. 

ARTH 424 High Renaissance Art in Italy 

(3) Architecture, sculpture and painting from 
about 1475 to 1500, 

ARTH 425 High Renaissance Art in Italy 

(3) Architecture, sculpture and painting from 
about 1500 to 1525. 

ARTH 430 European Baroque Art (3) Archi- 
tecture, sculpture and painting of the major 
southern European centers in the 1 7th cen- 
tury. 

ARTH 431 European Baroque Art (3) Archi- 
tecture, sculpture and painting of the major 
northern European centers in the 17th cen- 
tury. 

ARTH 434 French Painting (3) French paint- 
ing from 1400 to 1600 From Fouquet to 
Poussin. 

ARTH 435 French Painting (3) French paint- 
ing from 1600 to 1800. From Le Brun to 
David. 



Graduate Programs / 61 



ARTH 440 19th Century European Art (3) 

Architecture, sculpture and painting In Europe 
from neo-classicism to Romanticism. 

ARTH 441 19th Century European Art (3) 

Architecture, sculpture and painting In Europe. 
From realism, to Impressionism and symbolism. 

ARTH 445 Impressionism and Neo- 
Impressionism (3) Prerequisite: ARTH 260, 
261 or consent of Instructor. History of Impres- 
sionism and neo-lmpressionism: artists, styles, 
art theories, criticism, sources and Influence 
on 20th century. 

ARTH 450 20th Century Art (3) Painting, 
sculpture and architecture from the late 19th 
century to 1920. 

ARTH 452 History of Photography (3) 
History of photography as art from 1839 to 
the present. 

ARTH 454 Nineteenth and Twentieth Cen- 
tury Sculpture (3) Trends in sculpture from 
neo-classicism to the present. Emphasis will 
be put on the redefinition of sculpture during 
the 20th century. 

ARTH 460 History of the Graphic Arts (3) 
Prerequisite, ARTH 100, or ARTH 260 and 
261 , or consent of Instructor. Graphic tech- 
niques and styles In Europe from 1400 to 
1800: contributions of major artists. 
ARTH 462 African Art (3) First semester, 
the cultures west of the Niger river (Nigeria 
through Mall) from 400 B.C. to the present. 
The art is studied through Its Iconography 
and function in the culture and the Intercul- 
tural Influences upon the artists. Including a 
study of the societies, cults and ceremonies 
during which the art was used. 

ARTH 463 African Art (3) Second semester, 
the cultures east and south of Nigeria. The 
art Is studied through its Iconography and 
function in the culture and the mtercultural 
influences upon the artists, Including a study 
of the societies, cults and ceremonies during 
which the art was used. 

ARTH 464 African Art Research (3) Seminar 
with concentration on particular aspects of 
African art. The course Is given at the Museum 
of African Art in Washington, DC. 

ARTH 470 Latin American Art (3) Art of the 

pre-hispanic and the colonial periods. 

ARTH 471 Latin American Art (3) Art of the 

19th and 20th centuries. 

ARTH 476 History of American Art (3) 

Architecture, sculpture and painting in the 
United States from the colonial period to about 
1875. 

ARTH 477 History of American Art (3) 

Architecture, sculpture and painting In the 
United States from about 1875 to the present. 

ARTH 489 Special Topics In Art History (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of department head or 
Instructor. May be repeated to a maximum of 
six credits 

ARTH 498 Directed Studies in Art History I 
(2-3) For advanced students, by permission 
of department chairman. Course may be re- 
peated for credit If content differs. 

ARTH 499 Directed Studies in Art History II 
(2-3) 

ARTH 612 Romanesque Art (3) Painting 
and sculpture in western Europe in the 1 1th 

62 / Graduate Programs 



and 12 centuries; regional styles; relation- 
ships between styles of painting and sculp- 
ture; religious content. 

ARTH 614 Gothic Art (3) Painting and sculp- 
ture in western Europe in the 11th and 12th 
centuries: regional styles: relationships be- 
tween styles of painting and sculpture; reli- 
gious content. 

ARTH 630 The Art of Mannerism (3) Prereq- 
uisite, ART 423 or permission of instructor 
Mannerism In Europe during the 16th century; 
beginnings in Italy; ramifications In France, 
Germany, Flanders, Spain: painting, architec- 
ture, and sculpture. 

ARTH 634 French Painting from Lebrun 
to Gerlcault - 1715-1815. (3) Development 
of iconography and style from the baroque 
to neoclasslcism and romanticism. Trends 
and major artists. 

ARTH 656 19th Century Realism, 1830- 
1860. (3) Prerequisite, ART 440 or 441 or 
equivalent. Courbet and the problem of realism 
precursors, David, Gerlcault, landscape 
schools; Manet; artistic and social theories; 
realism outside France. 
ARTH 662 20th Century European Art. (3) 
Prerequisite, ART 450, 451 or equivalent. A 
detailed examination of the art of an individual 
country in the 12th century; France, Germany, 
Italy, Spain, England. 

ARTH 676 20th Century American Art. (3) 

Prerequisite, ART 450. 451 or equivalent. The 
'eight,' the armory show, American abstraction, 
romantic-realism, new deal art projects, 
American surrealism and expressionism. 

ARTH 692 Methods of Art History. (3) 

Methods of research and criticism applied to 
typical art-historical problems; bibliography 
and other research tools. May be taken for 
credit one or two semesters. 
ARTH 694 Museum Training Program. (3) 
ARTH 695 Museum Training Program. (3) 

ARTH 698 Directed Graduate Studies in 
Art History. (3) For advanced graduate stu- 
dents, by permission of head of department. 
Course may be repeated for credit if content 
differs. 

ARTH 699 Special Topics in Art History. 
(3) Prerequisite, consent of department head 
or Instructor. 

ARTH 702 Seminar in Classical Art. (3) 

Prerequisite, ARTH 402, 403 or permission 
of instructor. 

ARTH 712 Seminar in Medieval Art (3) Pre- 
requisite, ARTH 412, 413 or permission of in- 
structor. 

ARTH 728 Seminar Topics in Italian 
Renaissance Art. (3) Problems selected 
from significant themes in the field of Italian 
renaissance art and architecture, 1200-1600. 
May be repeated for credit If content differs. 

ARTH 736 Seminar in 18th Century Euro- 
pean Art. (3) 

ARTH 740 Seminar in Romanticism. (3) 

Problems derived from the development of 
romantic art during the 18th and 19th cen- 
turies. 

ARTH 743 Seminar in 19th Century Euro- 
pean Art. (3) Problems derived from the pe- 



riod starting with David and ending with 

Cezanne. 

ARTH 760 Seminar in Contemporary Art. 

(3) 

ARTH 770 Seminar In Latin-American Art. 

(3) Prerequisite, ARTH 471 or permission of 

Instructor. 

ARTH 772 Seminar in Modern Mexican Art. 

(3) Prerequisite, ARTH 471 or permission of 
instructor. Problems of Mexican art of the 
19th and 20th centuries; Mexicanlsmo; the 
'Mural Renaissance': architectural regional- 
ism. 

ARTH 774 Seminar in 19th Century Ameri- 
can Art. (3) Problems In architecture and 
painting from the end of the colonial period 
until 1860. 

ARTH 780 Seminar-Problems in Architec- 
tural History and Criticism. (3) 
ARTH 784 Seminar in Literary Sources of 
Art History. (3) Art historical sources from 
Pliny to Malraux. 

ARTH 798 Directed Graduate Studies in 

Art History. (3) 

ARTH 799 Master's Thesis Research. (1-6) 

ARTH 899 Doctoral Dissertation Research. 

(1-8) 

Art Studio 

ARTS 404 Experiments in Visual Processes. 

(3) Six hours per week. Prerequisites, either 
ARTS 220, 330 or 340. Investigation and exe- 
cution of process oriented art. Group and in- 
dividual experimental projects. 

ARTS 410 Drawing IV. (3) Six hours per week. 
Prerequisite, ARTS 310. Ad/anced drawing, 
with emphasis on human figure, Its structure 
and organic likeness to forms In nature. Com- 
positional problems deriving from this relation- 
ship are also stressed. 

ARTS 420 Painting IV. (3) Six hours per week. 
Prerequisite, ARTS 324. Creative painting. 
Emphasis on personal direction and self-crit- 
icism. Group seminars. 

ARTS 430 Sculpture IV. (3) Six hours per 
week. Prerequisite, ARTS 335. Problems and 
techniques of newer concepts, utilizing various 
materials, such as plastics and metals. Tech- 
nical aspects of welding stressed. 

ARTS 440 Printmaking III. (3) Six hours per 
week. Prerequisite, ARTS 340 and 344. Con- 
temporary experimental techniques of one 
print medium with group discussions. 

ARTS 441 Printmaking IV. (3) Six hours per 
week. Prerequisite, ARTS 440. Continuation 
of ARTS 440. 

ARTS 489 Special Problems in Studio Arts. 

(3) Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Re- 
peatable to a maximum of six hours. 

ARTS 498 Directed Studies in Studio Art. 
(2-3) For advanced students, by permission 
of department chairman. Course may be re- 
peated for credit If content differs. 

ARTS 610 Drawing. (3) Sustained treatment 
of a theme chosen by student. Wide variety 
of media. 

ARTS 614 Drawing. (3) Traditional materials 
and methods Including oriental, sumi ink 



drawings and techniques of classical Ejro- 
pean masters. 

ARTS 616 Drawing. (3) Detailed anatomical 
study of the human figure and preparation of 
large scale mural compositions. 

ARTS 620 Painting. (3) 

ARTS 624 Painting. (3) 

ARTS 626 Painting. (3) 

ARTS 627 Painting. (3) 

ARTS 630 Experimentation in Sculpture. (3) 

ARTS 634 Experimentation in Sculpture. (3) 

ARTS 636 Materials and Techniques in 
Sculpture. (3) For advanced students, meth- 
ods of armature building, and the use of a 
variety of stone, wood, metal, and plastic 
matenals, 

ARTS 637 Sculpture-Casting and Foundry. 

(3) The traditional methods of plaster casting 
and the complicated types involving metal, 
cire perdue, sand-casting and newer meth- 
ods, such as cold metal process. 

ARTS 640 Printmaking. (3) Advanced prob- 
lems. Relief process 

ARTS 644 Printmaking. (3) Advanced prob- 
lems. Intaglio process. 

ARTS 646 Printmaking. (3) Advanced prob- 
lems. Lithographic process. 

ARTS 647 Seminar in Printmaking. (3) 

ARTS 689 Special Problems in Studio Art. 

(3) Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Re- 
peatable to a maximum of six hours. 

ARTS 690 Drawing and Painting. (■;) Prep- 
aration and execution of a wall decoration. 

ARTS 698 Directed Graduate Studies in 
Studio Art. (3) For advanced graduate stu- 
dents by permission of head of department. 
Course may be repeated for credit if content 
differs. 

ARTS 798 Directed Graduate Studies in 
Studio Art. (3) 

ARTS 799 Master's Thesis Research. (1-6) 



Astronomy Program 

Professor and Director: Kerr 
Professors: Bell. Erickson. Kundu. Opik 

(part-time). Rose. Smith, Wentzel, 

Westerhout, Zuckennan 
Adjunct Professors: Brandt, Musen 
Associate Professors: A Hearn, 

Harrington. f\^atthews. Tnmble (part-time). 

Zipoy 
Adjunct Associate Professor: Clark 
Assistant Professors: Scott. Wilson 
The Astronomy Program, administra- 
tively part of the Department of Physics 
and Astronomy, offers programs of 
study leading to the degrees of M.S. and 
Ph.D. in Astronomy, The M,S. program 
includes both thesis and non-thesis op- 
tions. 

A full schedule of courses in all fields 
of astronomy is offered including galac- 
tic astronomy, astrophysics, solar sys- 
tem structure, observational astronomy, 



celestial mechanics, solar physics, 
study of the interstellar medium and ex- 
tragalactic astronomy. 

The faculty has expertise in most ma- 
jor branches of astronomy. The re- 
search program is centered around two 
major areas of interest. The first one is 
the study of our Galaxy: its large-scale 
spiral structure, detailed structure and 
theory of interstellar gas clouds and the 
distribution of different types of stars. 
The second is the study of stellar atmos- 
pheres and interiors, incuding also the 
solar atmosphere, stellar evolution, and 
Planetary nebulae. Research is also 
done on extragalactic astronomy and on 
the physics of the solar system. 
Admission and Degree Information 
Students are expected to demonstrate 
competence in the following subjects 
prior to admission to graduate work: gen- 
eral physics, heat, intermediate mechan- 
ics, optics, electricity and magnetism, 
modern physics, differential and integral 
calculus, and advanced calculus. A stu- 
dent may be admitted without one of 
these courses, but he should plan to 
make up the deficiency as soon as possi- 
ble, either by including such a course as 
a part of his graduate program or by inde- 
pendent study. 

No formal undergraduate course 
work in astronomy is required. How- 
ever, an entering student should have a 
working knowledge of the basic facts of 
astronomy such as is obtainable from 
one of the many elementary textbooks. 
A more advanced knowledge of astron- 
omy will of course enable a student to 
progress more rapidly duhng the first 
year of graduate work. 

Normally, a satisfactory score on the 
GRE Advanced Test in Physics is re- 
quired before an applicant s admission 
to the Graduate School will be con- 
sidered. In special cases, the Graduate 
Entrance Committee may waive this re- 
quirement, and set other conditions as a 
requirement for admission, to be ful- 
filled either before admission or during 
the first year at Maryland. 

Qualification for the Ph.D. program 
(which is decided in the middle or at the 
end of the second year) requires a 
written examination on basic astronomy 
at the end of the first year and an exten- 
sive research project during the second 
year. Overall performance in the exam, 
course work and research determines 
admission to the Ph.D. program. 

All candidates must take the courses 
ASTR 400. 401 . and 41 0, 41 1 (this re- 
quirement may be waived if the student 



has previous experience). All full-time 
students are expected to attend an 
average of two colloquia and/or 
seminars each week by registering for 
ASTR 698, Candidates for the Ph.D. 
should expect to take at least four 3- 
credit Astronomy courses at the 600 
and 700 level, exclusive of seminars 
and research projects. Normally all 
Ph.D. candidates take at least 12 
credits of advanced physics courses. 
Especially recommended are PHYS 
601, 604. and 622. Note: Course require- 
ments are currently under review and 
may be revised for the 1977-78 
academic year. 

Many other courses of direct interest 
to astronomy students are available in 
Physics, Mathematics, Meteorology, 
Electhcal Engineering, and Chemistry. 
The student is urged to obtain as wide a 
background as possible outside his field 
of specialization. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

The Astronomy Program carries on an 
extensive research program in the 
areas discussed above with the grad- 
uate students playing an active role in 
this research. Approximately one-fourth 
of all research papers published have a 
graduate student as one of the authors. 
The Program maintains a small optical 
observatory on campus. Due to the site, 
its main use is to enable students to gain 
experience in observational techniques 
and to test out new equipment. There is 
an important effort in the program de- 
voted to the development of optical in- 
strumentation. A Fourier Transform 
Spectrometer is now essentially oper- 
ational and a photoelectnc Fabry Perot 
Interferometer is being developed. 

The Program also operates a radio 
observatory near Borrego Springs. 
California. This is designed to operate at 
meter wavelengths and is one of the 
major long wavelength observatories in 
the country. A major commitment of this 
observatory will be to solar research, 
with the immediate aim of developing a 
radio heliograph which can provide real 
time mapping of the radio sun. Work will 
also go on there in the areas of galactic 
and extragalactic radio astronomy. 

The library facilities of the Program 
have recently benefited from the acqui- 
sition of a major new collection. Re- 
organization of the current facilities is in 
process. When completed, the Astron- 
omy library should be one of the fore- 
most collections in the country 

The Program has strong interaction 
with the national astronomy observa- 



Graduate Programs / 63 



tories, and many of the students and 
faculty carry on observing programs at 
tfiem. Tfiere are also very close ties with 
neighboring scientific institutes. A major 
program of cooperative research has 
been established with the Goddard 
Space Flight Center and a number of 
graduate students carry on research 
programs there. There are also close 
contacts with the Naval Observatory, 
the Naval Research Labs and other gov- 
ernment institutes. 

Financial Assistance 

Essentially all eligible graduate students 
are funded. The program offers both 
Research and Teaching Assistantships. 

Additional Information 

For more information, especially for 
physics courses related to astronomy, 
see the section on Physics. A brochure 
entitled "Graduate Study in Astronomy," 
describing the requirements, the 
courses and the research program in de- 
tail, is available from the department. All 
correspondence, including that concern- 
ing admission to the Astronomy Pro- 
gram, should be addressed to; Astron- 
omy Program, University of Maryland. 

Courses 

ASTR 400 Introduction to Astrophysics 

I. (3) Three lectures per week. Pre- or co- 
requisite, RHYS 422 or consent of instruc- 
tor. Spectroscopy, structure of the atmos- 
pheres of the sun and other stars. Obser^/a- 
tionl data and curves of growth. Chemical 
composition. 

ASTR 401 Introduction to Astrophysics 

II. (3) Three lectures per week. Prerequisite, 
ASTR 400. A brief survey of stellar structure 
and evolution, and of the physics of low- 
density gasses, such as the interstellar 
medium and the soiar atmosphere. Em- 
phasis is placed on a good understanding of 
a few theoretical concepts that have wide 
astrophysical applications 

ASTR 410 Observational Astronomy. (3) 

Prerequisites, working knowledge of cal- 
culus, physics through PHYS 284, or 263, 
and 3 credits of astronomy. An introduction to 
current methods of obtaining astronomical in- 
formation including radio, infrared, optical, 
ultra-violet, and x-ray astronomy. The labora- 
tory work will involve photographic and photo- 
electric observations with the department's 
optical telescope and 21 -cm line spec- 
troscopy, flux measurements and interfer- 
ometry with the department's radiotele- 
scopes. 

ASTR 41 1 Observational Astronomy. (3) 

Prerequisites, ASTR 410, working know- 
ledge of calculus, physics through PHYS 
284, or 263. and 3 credits of astronomy. An ii 
troduction to current methods of obtaining 
astronomical information including radio, in- 
frared, optical, ultra-violet, and x-ray astron- 
omy. The latxjratory work will Involve photo- 
graphic and photoelectric observations with 

64 / Graduate Programs 



the department's optical telescope and 21- 
cm line spectroscopy, flux measurements 
and interferometry with the department's ra- 
dioielescopes. Observatory work on indi- 
vidual projects. Every semester. 
ASTR 420 Introduction to Galactic Re- 
search. (3) Three lectures per week. Pre- 
requisite, MATH 141 and at least 12 credits of 
Introductory physics and astronomy courses. 
Stellar motions, methods of galactic re- 
search, study of our own and nearby gal- 
axies, clusters of stars. 
ASTR 430 The Solar System. (3) Prereq- 
uisite - MATH 246 and either PHYS 263 or 
PHYS 294, or consent of instructor. The struc- 
ture of planetary atmospheres, radiative 
transfer in planetary atmospheres, remote 
sensing of planetary surfaces, interior struc- 
ture of planets. Structure of comets. Brief dis- 
cussions of asteroids, satellite systems, and 
solar system evolution. 

ASTR 440 Introduction to Extra-Galactic 
Astronomy. (3) Prerequisite - MATH 141 
and at least 14 credits of introductory physics 
and astronomy including a background in 
astronomy at the ASTR 181-182 level, or 
consent of instructor. Properties of normal 
and peculiar galaxies, including radio gal- 
axies, and quasars: expansion of the uni- 
verse and cosmology. 

ASTR 450 Celestial Mechanics. (3) Three 
lectures a week. Prerequisite, PHYS 410 or 
consent of instructor. Celestial mechanics, 
orbit theory, equations of motion. 

ASTR 498 Special Problems in Astron- 
omy. (1-6) Prerequisite, major in physics or 
astronomy and/or consent of advisor. Re- 
search or special study. Credit according to 
work done. 

ASTR 600 Stellar Atmospheres. (3) Three 
lectures per week. Prerequisite, ASTR 400, 
401 , PHYS 422 or consent of the instructor. 
Observational methods, line formation, curve 
of growth, equation of transfer, stars with 
large envelopes, vanable stars, novae, mag- 
netic fields in stars. 

ASTR 605 Stellar Interiors. (3) Three lec- 
tures per week. Prerequisites, MATH 414 
and PHYS 422 or consent of instructor A 
study of stellar structure and evolution. This 
course will consider the question of energy 
transfer and generation in the interior of a 
star, the structure of stars, including prob- 
lems of turbulence, determination of chem- 
ical composition, non-homogeneous stars, 
evolution of both young and old stars, pul- 
sating stars, novae. 

ASTR 620 Galactic Research. (3) Prereq- 
uisites, astronomy 420, 410, 411, or consent 
of the instructor. Current methods of research 
into galactic structure, kinematics, and dy- 
namics. Basic dynamical theory. Optical and 
radio obsen/ational methods and current re- 
sults. Review of presently-determined dis- 
tribution and kinematics of the major con- 
stituents of the galaxy. Evolution of the 
galaxy. 

ASTR 625 Dynamics of Stellar Systems. 

(3) Three lectures per week. Prerequisite, 
PHYS 601 or ASTR 420. Study of the struc- 
ture and evolution of dynamical systems en- 
countered in astronomy. Stellar encounters 
viewed as a two-body problem, statistical 



treatment of encounters, study of dynamical 
problems in connection with star clusters, 
ellipsoidal galaxies, nuclei of galaxies, high- 
velocity stars. 

ASTR 630 Physics of the Solar System. 

(3) Three lectures per week. Prerequisite, 
PHYS 422. A survey of the problems of inter- 
planetary space, the solar wind, comets and 
meteors, planetary structure and atmos- 
pheres, motions of particles in the earth's 
magnetic field. 

ASTR 660 Physics of the Solar Envelope. 

(3) Three lectures per week. Prerequisites, 
PHYS 422, ASTR 400 or consent of instruc- 
tor. A detailed study of the solar atmosphere. 
Physics of solar phenomena, such as solar 
flares, structure of the corona, etc. 

ASTR 670 Interstellar Matter. (3) Three 
lectures per week. Prerequisites, previous or 
concurrent enrollment in PHYS 622, ASTR 
400 or 420, or consent of instructor. A study 
of the physical properties of interstellar gas 
and dust. This course will include diffuse 
nebulae, regions of ionized hydrogen, re- 
gions of neutral hydrogen, the problems of 
interstellar dust and perhaps planetary neb- 
ulae, molecules. 

ASTR 688 Special Topics In Modern As- 
tronomy. (1-16) Credit according to work 
done each semester. Prerequisite, consent 
of instructor. These courses will be given by 
specialists in various fields of modern as- 
tronomy, partly staff members, partly visiting 
professors or part-time lecturers. They will 
cover subjects such as: cosmology, discrete 
radio sources, magnetohydrodynamics in as- 
tronomy, the H.R. diagram, stellar evolution, 
external galaxies, galactic structure, chemi- 
stry of the interstellar medium, advanced 
celestial mechanics, astrometry, radio phy- 
sics of the sun, etc. 

ASTR 698 Seminar. (1) Seminars on va- 
rious topics in advanced astronomy are held 
each semester, with the contents varied 
each year. One credit for each semester. 
There are weekly colloquia by staff, astro- 
nomers from the Washington area, and visi- 
ting astronomers, usually on topics related 
to their own work. 

ASTR 699 Special Problems In Advanced 
Astronomy. (1-6) 

ASTR 788 Special Topics in Modern As- 
tronomy. (1-16) 

ASTR 799 Master's Thesis Research (1-6) 

ASTR 899 Doctoral Dissertation Re- 
search. (1-8) 



Botany Program 

Professor and Chairman: Sisler 
Professors: Corbett, Galloway, Kantzes, 

Klarman, Krusberg, Morgan, Patterson, 

Stern. 
Associate Professors: Barnett, Bean, Bottino, 

Curtis, Karlander, Lockard^ Motta, 

Rappleye, Reveal. 
Assistant Professors: Blevins, Broome, 

Stevenson, Van Valkenburg. 

'joint appointment with Secondary Education 

The Department of Botany offers grad- 
uate programs leading to the degrees of 



Master of Science and Doctor of Philoso- 
phy. Courses and research problems 
are developed on a personal basis and 
arranged according to the intellectual 
and professional needs of the student. 
Course programs are flexible and are de- 
signed under close supervision by the 
student's advisor. The objective of the 
program is to equip the student with a 
background and techniques for a career 
in plant science in academic, govern- 
mental, industrial or private laboratories. 

The areas of specialization are anat- 
omy and morphology, plant biochem- 
istry, plant biophysics, plant ecology, 
physiology of fungi, genetics and molec- 
ular biology, marine botany, mycology, 
plant nematology, plant pathology, phy- 
cology, plant physicology. taxonomy, 
and virology. 

Admission and Degree Information 

There are no special admission require- 
ments. A high degree of intellectual ex- 
cellance is of greater consequence than 
completion of a particular curriculum at 
the undergraduate level. The degree re- 
quirements are flexible. However, they 
involve demonstration of competence in 
the broad field of botany, as well as com- 
pletion of courses in other disciplines 
which are supportive of modern compe- 
tence in this field. A foreign language 
may be required if deemed essential by 
the student's Graduate Advisory Com- 
mittee. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

The Department has laboratories 
equipped to investigate most phases of 
botanical and molecular biological re- 
search. Field and greenhouse facilities 
are available for research requiring 
plant culture. Special laboratory rooms 
have been developed for research em- 
ploying radioactive isotopes. Major 
pieces of equipment include a trans- 
mission electron microscope, ultracentri- 
fuges. X-ray equipment, low-speed cen- 
trifuges, microtomes for cutting ultrathin 
sections, infra-red spectrophotometer, 
recording spectrophotometers, environ- 
mental controlled growth chambers. 
Herbarium, departmental reference 
room, enzyme preparation rooms, dark 
rooms, cold rooms, special culture ap- 
paratus for algae, fungi, and higher 
plants, spectrophotometers, and respi- 
rometers are among the many special 
pieces of equipment and facilities that 
are available for research. 

Financial Assistance 

Financial assistance is available in the 



form of teaching and research assistant- 
ships. 

Additional Information 

The Department has a special brochure 
available upon request. For specific in- 
formation on departmental programs, 
admission procedures or financial aid, 
contact: 

Chairman, Department of Botany 

University of Maryland 

Courses 

BOTN 401 Origins of Modern Botany. (1) 

Prerequisite: 20 credit hours in biological 
sciences including BOTN 100 or 101 or equiv- 
alent. History of botany as a science, from 
Ancient Greece through the 18th century: 
emphasis on botany as an intellectual and 
cultural pursuit. 

BOTN 402 Plant Microtechnique. (3) Pre- 
requisite: BOTN 1 00 or 1 01 , and consent of in- 
structor. One lecture and five hours of labora- 
tory per week. Preparation of temporary and 
permanent mounts, including selection of ma- 
tenal, killing and fixing, embedding, section- 
ing, and staining methods. 

BOTN 403 Medicinal and Poisonous Plants. 

(2) Prerequisite, BOTN 100 or 101 and CHEM 
1 04. Two lectures per week. A study of plants 
important to man that have medicinal or poison- 
ous properties. Emphasis on plant source, 
plant description, the active agent and its ben- 
eficial or detrimental physiological action and 
effects 

BOTN 405 Advanced Plant Taxonomy. (3) 

Two lectures and one laboratory penod per 
week. Prerequisites: BOTN 202 and BOTN 
212, or equivalents. A review of the history 
and principles of plant taxonomy with em- 
phasis on monographic and flonstic research. 
A detailed laboratory review of the families 
of flowenng plants. 

BOTN 407 Teaching Methods In Botany. (2) 

Four two-hour laboratory demonstration peri- 
ods per week, for eight weeks. Prerequisite, 
BOTN 100 or equivalent. A study of the biologi- 
cal pnnciples of common plants, and demon- 
strations, projects, and visual aids suitable for 
teaching in pnmary and secondary schools. 

BOTN 413 Plant Geography. (2) Prerequi- 
site. BOTN 100 or equivalent. A study of plant 
distribution throughout the world and the fac- 
tors generally associated with such distnbu- 
tion. 

BOTN 414 Plant Genetics. (3) Prerequisite. 
BOTN 100 or equivalent. The basic principles 
of plant genetics are presented: the mechan- 
ics of transmission of the hereditary factors in 
relation to the life cycle of seed plants, the 
genetics of specialized organs and tissues, 
spontaneous and induced mutations of basic 
and economic significance, gene action, genet- 
ic maps, the fundamentals of polyploidy, and 
genetics in relation to methods of plant breed- 
ing are the topics considered. 

BOTN 415 Plants and Mankind. (2) Pre- 
requisite. BOTN 100 or equivalent. A survey 
of the plants which are utilized by man. the 
diversity of such utilization, and their historic 
and economic significance. 



BOTN 416 Principles of Plant Anatomy. (4) 

Two lectures and two 2-hour laboratory peri- 
ods per week. The origin and development of 
cells, tissues, and tissue systems of vascular 
plants with special emphasis on seed-bearing 
plants. Particular stress is given to the 
comparative, systematic, and evolution- 
ary study of the structural components of the 
plants. Prerequisite, general botany. 

BOTN 417 Field Botany and Taxonomy. (2) 

Prerequisite. BOTN 100 or general biology. 
Four two-hour laboratory periods a week for 
eight weeks. The identification of trees, 
shrubs, and herbs, emphasizing the native 
plants of Maryland, Manuals, keys, and other 
techniques will be used. Numerous short field 
tnps will be taken. Each student will make an 
individual collection, 

BOTN 419 Natural History of Tropical Plants. 

(2) Prerequisite, one course in plant taxon- 
omy or permission of instructor. An introduc- 
tion to tropical vascular plants with emphasis 
on their morphological, anatomical, and habi- 
tat peculiarities and major taxonomic fea- 
tures, geographic distribution and economic 
utilization of selected families. Two. one-hour 
lectures per week. 

BOTN 422 Research Methods in Plant 
Pathology. (2) Two laboratory periods a 
week. Prerequisite, BOTN 221 or equivalent. 
Advanced training in the basic research tech- 
niques and methods of plant pathology. 

BOTN 424 Diagnosis and Control of Plant 
Diseases. (3) Prerequisite, BOTN 221. 
Three lectures per week. A study of various 
plant diseases grouped according to the man- 
ner in which the host plants are affected. Em- 
phasis will be placed on recognition of symp- 
toms of the various types of diseases and on 
methods of transmission and control of the 
pathogens involved, 

BOTN 425 Diseases of Ornamentals and 
Turf. (2) Prerequisite— BOTN 221. Two lec- 
tures per week. Designed for those students 
who need practical expenence in recognition 
and control of ornamentals and turf diseases. 
The symptoms and current control measures 
for diseases in these crop areas will be dis- 
cussed. 

BOTN 426 Mycology. (4) Two lectures and 
two three-hour laboratory periods per week. 
Prerequisite: botany 101 or permission of the 
instructor. An introductory course in the bi- 
ology, morphology and taxonomy of the fungi. 

BOTN 427 Field Plant Pathology. (1) Sum- 
mer session: lecture and laboratory to be ar- 
ranged. Prerequisite BOTN 221. or equiva- 
lent. The techniques of pesticide evaluation 
and the identification and control of diseases 
of Maryland crops are discussed. Offered in 
alternate years or more frequently with de- 
mand. 

BOTN 441 Plant Physiology. (4) Two lec- 
tures and one four-hour laboratory period a 
week. Prerequisites, BOTN 100 and general 
chemistry. Organic chemistry strongly recom- 
mended. A survey of the general physiologi- 
cal activities of plants. 

BOTN 462 Plant Ecology. (2) Prerequisite, 
BOTN 100. Two lectures per week. The dy- 
namics of populations as affected by environ- 
mental factors with special emphasis on the 



Graduate Programs / 65 



structure and composition of natural plant 
comnnunlties, both terrestlal and aquatic. 

BOTN 463 Ecology of Marsh and Dune 
Vegetation. (2) Two lectures a week. Pre- 
requisites. BOTN 100 An examination of the 
biology of higher plants in dune and marsh 
ecosystems. 

BOTN 464 Plant Ecology Laboratory. (2) 
Prerequisite- BOTN 462 or its equivalent or 
concurrent enrollment therein. One three- 
hour laboratory penod a week. Two or three 
field trips per semester. The application of 
field and experimental methods to the quali- 
tative and quantitative study of vegetation and 
ecosystems. 

BOTN 471 Marine and Estuarlne Botany. 

(3) Prerequisite, BOTN 441 or equivalent. An 
ecological discussion of plant life in the ma- 
rine environment of sea coasts, salt marshes, 
estuaries and open seas. 

BOTN 475 General Phycology. (4) One lec- 
ture and two three-hour laboratory periods 
per week. Prerequisites: BOTN 100 and 
BOTN 202, or permission of Instructor. An in- 
troductory study of both macro- and micro- 
algae, including the taxonomy, morphology, 
and life cycles of both fresh water and marine 
forms. 

BOTN 612 Plant Morphology. (3) Second 
semester. One lecture and two laboratory pe- 
riods per week. Prerequisites, BOTN 212, 
BOTN 41 1 , or equivalent, A comparative study 
of the morphology of the flowering plants, 
with special reference to the phylogeny and 
development of floral organs 

BOTN 613 Identification of Wood and 
Timbers. (2) Prerequisites; BOTN 416 or 
equivalent and permission of instructor. Meth- 
ods and procedures for determination of na- 
tive and exotic woods used In commerce. 
Use of keys to and descriptions of timbers, 
origins of indigenous and imported woods, 
vernacular and trade names, properties, 
uses, and associated literature. 

BOTN 615 Plant Cytogenetics. (3) First 
semester. Two lectures and one laboratory 
period a week. Prerequisite, introductory 
genetics. An advanced study of the current 
status of plant genetics, particularly gene mu- 
tations and their relation to chromosome 
changes In corn and other favorable materi- 
als. 

BOTN 616 Nucleic Acids and Molecular 
Genetics. (2) Fall semester, alternate years. 
Prerequisites, biochemistry (CHEM 661) and 
cytogenetics (BOTN 615) or equivalent, or 
consent of Instructor. One session of two 
hours per week. An advanced treatment of 
the biochemistry of nucleic acids and molec- 
ular genetics for qualified graduate students. 
Lectures and assigned reports on recent 
progress in the chemistry of inheritance. 

BOTN 620 Methods in Plant Tissue Cul- 
ture. (2) Prerequisite, consent of instructor. 
One lecture and one two-hour laboratory pe- 
riod a week A methodology and techniques 
course designed to give the student back- 
ground and expenence in plant tissue culture. 

BOTN 621 Physiology of Fungi. (2) First 
semester. Prerequisites, organic chemistry 
and BOTN 441 or equivalent in bacterial or 
animal physiology. A study of various aspects 
of fungal metabolism, nutrition, biochemical 

66 / Graduate Programs 



transformation, fungal products, and mech- 
anism of fungicidal action. 

BOTN 623 Physiology of Fungi Labora- 
tory. (1) First semester. One laboratory peri- 
od per week. Prerequisites, BOTN 621 or 
concurrent registration therein. Application of 
equipment and techniques In the study of fun- 
gal physiology, 

BOTN 625 Physiology of Pathogens and 
Host-Pathogen Relationships. (3) Three 
lecture penods a week, A study of enzymes, 
toxins, and other factors Involved in pathogen- 
icity and the relationship of host-pathogen 
interaction to disease development, 

BOTN 632 Plant Virology. (2) Second 
semester. Two lectures per week on the bio- 
logical, biochemical, and biophysical aspects 
of viruses and virus diseases of plants. Pre- 
requisites, bachelor's degree or equivalent 
In any biological science and permission of 
instructor. 

BOTN 634 Plant Virology Laboratory. (2) 

Second semester. Two laboratories per week 
on the application and techniques for study- 
ing the biological, biochemical and biophys- 
ical aspects of plant viruses. Prerequisites, 
bachelor's degree or equivalent in any biologi- 
cal science and BOTN 632 or concurrent 
registration therein, and permission of the 
instructor. 

BOTN 636 Plant Nematology. (4) Second 
semester. Two lectures and two laboratory 
periods a week. Prerequisite, BOTN 221 or 
permission of instructor. The study of plant- 
parasitic nematodes, their morphology, an- 
atomy, taxonomy, genetics, physiology, ecol- 
ogy, host-parasite relations and control. Re- 
cent advances in their field will be emphasized. 

BOTN 641 Advanced Plant Physiology. (2) 

First semster. Prerequisites. BOTN 441 or 
equivalent, and organic chemistry. A presen- 
tation of the metabolic processes occurring in 
plants. Including the roles of the essential 
elements in these processes with special em- 
phasis on recent literature. 

BOTN 642 Plant Biochemistry. (2) Second 
semester. Prerequisite, BOTN 641 or CHEM 
461 and 462. A treatment of those aspects 
of biochemistry especially pertinent to plant- 
respiration, photosynthesis, and organic 
transformations. 

BOTN 644 Plant Biochemistry Laboratory. 

(2) Plant biochemistry laboratory. Second 
semester. Prerequisites, BOTN 642 or con- 
current registration therein. Use of apparatus 
and application of techniques in the study 
of the chemistry of plants and plant materials. 
One scheduled three-hour laboratory period 
per week, plus one one-hour laboratory to be 
arranged, 

BOTN 645 Growth and Development. (2) 
First semester. Prerequisite, 12 semester 
hours of plant science. A study of current 
developments in the mathematical treatment 
of growth and the effects of radiation, plant 
hormones, photoperiodism, and internal bio- 
chemical balance during the development of 
the plant. 

BOTN 650 Mineral Nutrition of Plants. (2) 

Prerequisite: BOTN 441 Two lectures per 
week. A study of the inorganic nutrients re- 
quired for plant growth and development, 



with emphasis on mechanisms of nutrient up- 
take, translocation, and mineral metabolism. 

BOTN 652 Plant Biophysics. (2) Second 
semester. Prerequisites. BOTN 641 and at 
least one year in physics. An advanced course 
dealing with the operation of physical 
phenomena In plant life processes, 
processes. 

BOTN 654 Plant Biophysics Laboratory. (2) 

Plant biophysics laboratory. Second semes- 
ter. Prerequisites BOTN 652 or concurrent 
registration therein. A quantitative and quali- 
tative study of plant systems by physical and 
physiochemical methods and Instruments. 
One scheduled three-hour laboratory period 
per week, plus one one-hour laboratory per- 
iod to be arranged. 

BOTN 661 Advanced Plant Ecology. (3) 

Prerequisite: working knowledge of ele- 
mentary genetics and calculus, or permission 
of the instructor. Population dynamics, evolu- 
tionary mechanisms, and quantitative as- 
pects of the analysis of natural communities. 
Special emphasis will be given to recent theo- 
retical developments. 

BOTN 672 Physiology of Algae. (2) Second 

semester. Prerequisite, BOTN 642, the equiva- 
lent In allied fields, or permission of the instruc- 
tor. A study of the physiology and compara- 
tive biochemistry of the algae. Laboratory 
techniques and recent advances in algal nutri- 
tion, photosynthesis, and growth will be reviewe 

BOTN 674 Physiology of Algae Labora- 
tory. (1) Second semester. One laboratory 
period a week. Prerequisites, previous or con- 
current enrollment In BOTN 672, and permis- 
sion of instructor. Special laboratory tech- 
niques Involved in the study of algal nutrition. 

BOTN 698 Seminar in Botany. (1) First 
and second semesters. Prerequisite, permis- 
sion of the Instructor. Discussion of special 
topics and current literature in all phases of 
botany. 

BOTN 699 Special Problems in Botany. 
(1-3) 

A - Physiology 
B - Ecology 
C - Pathology 
D - Mycology 
E - Nematology 
F - Cytology 
G - Cytogenetics 
H - Morphology 
I - Anatomy 
J - Taxonomy 

First and second semester. Credit according 
to time scheduled and organization of course. 
Maximum credit toward an advanced degree 
for the individual student at the discretion of 
the department. This course may be orga- 
nized as a lecture series on a specialized ad- 
vanced topic, or may consist partly, or entirely, 
of experimental procedures. It may be taught 
by visiting lecturers, or by resident staff 
members, 

BOTN 799 Master's Thesis Research. (1-6) 
BOTN 899 Doctoral Dissertation Research. 
(1-8) 



Business and Management 
Program 

Dean: Lamone 

Assistant Deans: Haslem, Edelson 

Director of Doctoral Program: Pfaffenberger 

Director of MBA. Program: Polst 

Professor Emeritus: Clemens 

Professors: H. Anderson, Carroll. Dawson, 
Gannon, Gass, Greer, Haslem, Lamone, 
Levine, Locke, Loeb, Nash, Paine, Roberts, 
Taff. 

Associate Professors: Ashmen, Bedingfleld, 
Edelson, Edmister, Fromovitz, Hynes, 
Kuehl, Leete, Nickels, Pfaffenberger, Poist, 
Thieblot, WIdhelm. 

Assistant Professors: C. Anderson, Beard, 
Bloom, Bowers, Corsi, Ford, Formisano, 
Golden, Greene, Jolson, Kumar, May, 
Mayer-Sommer, Robeson, Schneier. 
Spekman. Taylor. 

Lecturers: Boisjoiy, Harvey. Moerdyk. 
Reckers. Stagliano. 

The College of Business and Manage- 
ment offers graduate work leading to the 
degrees of Master of Business Admin- 
istration (MBA) and Doctor of Business 
Administration (DBA). The College has 
the only MBA program in the Maryland- 
Washington metropolitan area ac- 
credited by the American Assembly of 
Collegiate Schools of Business 
(AACSB), a reflection of the quality of its 
faculty, programs, students, and facili- 
ties. Of the more than 500 graduate pro- 
grams, in business and management in 
the country, only approximately 175 are 
accredited by the AACSB. 

Areas of faculty specialization in- 
clude accounting: finance: manage- 
science and statistics: marketing: or- 
ganizational behavior and industrial re- 
lations: and transportation, business, 
and public policy. 

Admission and Degree Information 

Admission criteria for the MBA and DBA 
programs are based on (1) a "B" or bet- 
ter average as an undergraduate and/or 
graduate student who has completed a 
program of study from a regionally ac- 
credited university, (2) score on the 
Graduate Management Admission Test 
(GMAT), (3) letters of recommendation, 
and (4) other relevant information and 
professional experience. 

The College of Business and Manage- 
ment offers an MBA program designed 
to provide the educational foundation 
for those students with the potential to 
exhibit the highest degree of excellence 
in their future careers as professional 
managers. The MBA program varies in 
length from one to two years, depending 
on the student's previous college prepar- 
ation. Successful students in the pro- 
gram are expected to demonstrate the 



following: (1) a thorough and integrated 
knowledge of the basic tools, concepts 
and theories relating to professional 
management: 2) behavioral and analyti- 
cal skills necessary to deal creatively 
and effectively with organizations and 
management problems: 3) an under- 
standing of the economic, political, tech- 
nological, and social environments in 
which organizations operate. 4) a sense 
of professional and personal integrity 
and social responsibility in the conduct 
of managerial affairs both internal and 
external to the organization. Both day 
and some evening courses are offered. 
If the student's undergraduate major 
was not business, the following 500- 
level prerequisite courses must be com- 
pleted with a "B " average as early as 
possible in the student's graduate pro- 
gram: BMGT 501 (3 hours), BMGT 502 
(3 hours), BMGT 503 (3 hours), BMGT 
504 (4 hours). These basic knowledge 
courses may be waived by the Director 
of the MBA Program if equivalent 
courses have been satisfactorily 
completed. 

Students whose baccalaureate de- 
gree is in business administration will or- 
dinarily have included the topics cov- 
ered by these prerequisite courses in 
their undergraduate work. For the MBA 
degree they will need only the 35 credit 
hours described below. These 35 hours 
must be taken in 700-level courses and 
above (1600-level and above for courses 
in other campus graduate programs.). 

A group of eight graduate courses 
(23 hours) is required of all MBA stu- 
dents: BMGT 720 (3 hours): BMGT 732 
or 734 (4 hours): BMGT 740 (3 hours): 
BMGT 750 (3 hours): BMGT 764 (3 
hours): BMGT 775 (3 hours): BMGT 790 
or 791 (3 hours): and BMGT 701 (1 
hour). This common core provides the 
student with a knowledge of behavioral 
and analytical skills as well as a thor- 
ough understanding of managerial econom- 
ics and the functional fields necessaary 
for all professional managers. 

The student has the opportunity to se- 
lect a field of concentration and/or rele- 
vant electives with the remaining four 
graduate courses (12 credits). A field 
of concentration is defined as a mini- 
mum of six hours and a maximum of 
twelve hours in an area including the fol- 
lowing: (1) Accounting: (2) Finance: (3) 
International Business: (4) Information 
Systems Management: (5) Marketing 
(minimum of 9 hours required): (6) Man- 
agement Science and Statistics: (7) Or- 
ganizational Behavior and Organization 



Theory: (8) Personnel and Labor Rela- 
tions: and (9) Transportation and Phy- 
sical Distribution. Any elective courses 
used to fulfill degree requirements 
should be relevant to the student's area 
of concentration and/or educational 
needs. There is no thesis requirement 
for the MBA degree. 

The DBA program is designed to pro- 
duce outstanding scholars in manage- 
ment related disciplines. Graduates of the 
program are well-qualified to take facul- 
ty professional, research, or administra- 
tive positions in colleges and universi- 
ties, government agencies, private re- 
search organizations, or business firms. 

The Maryland DBAs achieve excel- 
lence through (1) extensive preparation 
in major and related fields, (2) joint re- 
search with faculty and fellow DBA stu- 
dents, (3) independent research cul- 
minating in the writing of a doctoral 
dissertation, and (4) the teaching of 
courses in their major field. 

Each student's DBA program must be 
approved initially by the student's major 
area faculty chairman or his or her repre- 
sentative and reviewed annually with 
the student. Minor areas must be ap- 
proved initially by the minor area chair- 
man or his or her designated representa- 
tive. 

Major and minor areas in the college 
include the following: (1) Accounting, (2) 
Finance, (3) Management Science and 
Statistics, (4) Marketing, (5) Organiza- 
tional Behavior and Organization Theory, 
(6) Personnel and Labor Relations, (7) 
Transportation and Physical Distribu- 
tion, and (8) Information Systems Man- 
agement. 

DBA requirements for the typical stu- 
dent are approximately 75 semester 
hours, not including dissertation credits. 
Thirty-three of the 75 semester hours 
are devoted to fulfilling the general re- 
quirements, discussed below, with the 
remaining 42 credits distributed among 
the student's major and minor fields of 
study. 

The general requirements for all DBA 
students are BMGT 720, BMGT 740, 
BMGT 750, BMGT 764, two three-credit 
graduate courses in economics (BMGT 
775 may be used as one of the two 
courses), nine credits in quantitative 
methods at the 700 level or above ap- 
proved by the students faculty chair- 
man, and BMGT 880 plus three addition- 
al graduate credits in research metho- 
dology. 

These general program requirements 
may be waived by the Director of the 



Graduate Programs / 67 



Doctoral Program if equivalent courses 
at AACSB accredited schools have 
been satisfactorily completed. Some of 
these courses may be included in the 
major and minor course requirements. 

The DBA student Is placed on aca- 
demic probation after 12 hours unless 
he or she maintains at least a 3.25 GPA. 
The probationary period will last one 
semester, at which time the student will 
be dismissed unless a 3.25 GPA level 
is obtained. 

The DBA student may select a single 
major with tw/o minors or a double major. 
For a single major, the student takes 
18 credits beyond the bachelor's degree 
in the major field, at least 6 of which 
must be taken in graduate seminars at 
the 800 level at the University of Mary- 
land. The minors may include areas in- 
side or outside the College of Business 
and fylanagement. Each minor is com- 
prised of 12 credits. 

For a double major, the student takes 
21 credit hours in each of two major 
fields, one of which may be in a disci- 
pline outside the College of Business 
and Management. 

Both the single and double major ar- 
rangements comprise 42 credit hours in 
total. Special permission is required 
from the College's graduate committee 
to approve a double major or a single 
major with both minors in disciplines out- 
side the College of Business and Man- 
agement. Typical outside minors in- 
clude such areas as Computer Science, 
Economics, Engineering, Mathematics, 
Government and Politics, Psychology, 
and Sociology. 

Students take comprehensive ex- 
aminations in major and minor subject 
areas. Following successful completion 
of the written examinations, each stu- 
dent must pass an oral examination 
given by a committee of the college grad- 
uate faculty. Any student receiving a 
"pass with distinction" in all written ex- 
aminations will be exempted from the 
oral comprehensive. 

The dissertation proposal is defended 
by each DBA candidate at an open meet- 
ing. All faculty and other DBA students 
are invited to attend and participate in 
the proposal defense. 

The dissertation must exhibit the can- 
didate's competence in analysis, inter- 
pretation, and presentation of research 
findings, and should be a major contribu- 
tion to the literature of the field. The can- 
didate must defend his or her disserta- 
tion in a final oral dissertation defense. 



Facilities and Special Resources 

The faculty has been recruited from the 
graduate programs of leading univer- 
sities in the nation. They are dedicated 
scholars, teachers, and professional 
leaders, unusual in their comparative 
youth, academic excellence, and strong 
commitment to the education of the pro- 
fessional manager. 

Special programs offered by the Col- 
lege include an Executives-in-Resi- 
dence Program and an MBA practicum 
course, BMGT 791 , in which students 
research a problem of significant man- 
agement concern in a participating firm 
or agency. Through graduate program 
requirements and faculty research activi- 
ties, students gain exposure to state 
and federal agencies and to the vast 
educational, research, library, and cul- 
tural resources of Washington, D.C. 

The students also have access to the 
exceptional academic and professional 
resources of the College Park campus 
including excellent library and computer 
facilities. A remote computer terminal 
and on-line teletype facilities are located 
in the building. 

Financial Assistance 

Financial aid is available to qualified 
students in the form of fellowships and 
graduate assistantships, and, for DBA 
students, assistant instructorships. 

Additional Information 

The College has available brochures 
which give specific degree require- 
ments for the MBA and DBA programs. 
Initial inquiries regarding the MBA pro- 
gram should be directed to: 
Director of the MBA Program 
College of Business and Manage- 
ment and for the DBA program 
Director of the Doctoral Program 
College of Business and Manage- 
ment 

Courses 

BMGT 401 Introduction to Systems Analy- 
sis. (3) Students enrolled in the college 
of business and management curricula will 
register for IFSM 436. For detailed informa- 
tion on Prerequisites and descriptions of the 
course, refer to IFSM 436. The credits earned 
in IFSM 436 may be included in the total 
credits earned in the area of concentration 
in business and management. 

BMGT 420 Undergraduate Accounting 
Seminar. (3) Prerequisite, senior standing 
as an accounting major or consent of instruc- 
tor. Enrollment limited to upper one-third of 
senior class. Seminar coverage of outstand- 
ing current non-text literature, current prob- 
lems and case studies in accounting. 



BMGT 421 Undergraduate Accounting 
Seminar. (3) Prerequisite, senior standing as 
an accounting major or consent of instructor. 
Enrollment limited to upper one-third of senior 
class. Seminar coverage of outstanding cur- 
rent non-text literature, current problems and 
case studies in accounting. 

BMGT 422 Auditing Theory and Practice. 

(3) Prerequisite, BMGT 311 . A study of tfie 
principles and problems of auditing and appli- 
cation of accounting principles to the prepara- 
tion of audit working papers and reports. 

BMGT 423 Apprenticeship in Accounting. 

(0) Prerequisites, minimum of 20 semester 
hours in accounting and the consent of the 
accounting staff. A period of apprenticeship 
is provided with nationally known firms of cer- 
tified public accountants from about January 
15 to February 15. 

BMGT 424 Advanced Accounting. (3) Pre- 
requisite, BMGT 31 1 Advanced accounting 
theory to specialized problems in partner- 
ships, ventures, consignments, installment 
sales, insurance, statement of affairs, re- 
ceiver's accounts, realization and liquidation 
reports, and consolidation of parent and sub- 
sidiary accounts. 

BMGT 425 CPA Problems. (3) Prerequisite, 
BMGT 311, or consent of instructor. A study 
of the nature, form and content of CPA. ex- 
aminatons by means of the preparation of 
solutions to. and an analysis of, a large sam- 
ple of CPA. problems covering the various 
accounting fields. 

BMGT 426 Advanced Cost Accounting. (2) 

Prerequisite, BMGT 321 . A continuation of 
basic cost accounting with special emphasis 
on process costs, standard costs, joint costs, 
and by-product cost. 

BMGT 427 Advanced Auditing Theory and 
Practice. (3) Prerequisite, BMGT 422. Ad- 
vanced auditing theory and practice and re- 
port writing. 

BMGT 430 Linear Statistical Models in 
Business. (3) Prerequisite, BMGT 230 or 
consent of instructor. Model building involv- 
ing an intensive study of the general linear 
stochastic model and the applications of this 
model to business problems. The model is 
derived in matrix form and this form is used 
to analyze both the regression and anova 
formulations of the general linear model. 

BMGT 431 Design of Statistical Experi- 
ments in Business. (3) Prerequisite, BMGT 
230 or 231 . Surveys anova models, basic and 
advanced experimental design concepts. 
Non-parametric tests and correlation are 
emphasized. Applications of these tech- 
niques to business problems in primarily the 
marketing and behavioral sciences are 
stressed. 

BMGT 432 Sample Survey Design for Busl- 
nes and Economics. (3) Prerequisite, 
BMGT 230 or 231 . Design of probability 
samples. Simple random sampling, stratified 
random sampling, systematic sampling, and 
cluster sampling designs are developed and 
compared for efficiency under varying as- 
sumptions about the population sampled. Ad- 
vanced designs such as multistage cluster 
sampling and replicated sampling are sur- 
veyed. Implementing these techniques in esti- 



68 / Graduate Programs 



mating parameters of business models Is 
stressed. 

BMGT 433 Statistical Decision Theory in 
Business. (3) Prerequisite, BMGT 231 or 
consent of Instructor. Bayeslan approach to 
the use of sample information In decision- 
making. Concepts of loss, risk, decision cri- 
teria, expected returns, and expected utility 
are examined. Application of these concepts 
to decision-making in the firm In various con- 
texts are considered. 

BMGT 434 Operations Research I. (3) Pre- 
requisite, BMGT 230, MATH 240 or permis- 
sion of instructor. Designed pnmanly for stu- 
dents majoring in management science, sta- 
tistics, and Information systems manage- 
ment. It is the first semester of a two semes- 
ter Introduction to the philosophy, techniques 
and applications of operations research. Top- 
ics covered include linear programming, 
postoptimallty analysis, network algorithms, 
dynamic programming. Inventory and equip- 
ment replacement models. 

BMGT 435 Operations Research II. (3) Pre- 
requisite, BMGT 434, or permission of Instruc- 
tor. The second semester of a two-part Intro- 
duction to operations research The primary 
emphasis is on stochastic models in manage- 
ment science. Topics Include stochastic lin- 
ear programming, probabilistic dynamic pro- 
gramming. Markov processes, probabilistic 
inventory models, queueing theory and simu- 
lation. 

BMGT 436 Applications of Mathematical 
Programming In Management Science. (3) 

Prerequisite. BMGT 434 or permission of in- 
structor. Theory and applications of linear, 
integer, and nonlinear programming models 
to management decisions. Topics covered 
include the basic theorems of linear pro- 
gramming; the matnx formulation of the sim- 
plex, and dual simplex algorithms; decom- 
position, cutting plane, branch and bound, 
and Implicit enumeration algorithms; gradient 
based algorithms; and quadratic program- 
ming. Special emphasis is placed upon model 
formulation and solution using prepared 
computer algorithms. 

BMGT 438 Topics In Statistical Analysis 
for Business Management. (3) Prerequisite, 
BMGT 430 and MATH 240 or pennlssion of 
the instructor. Selected topics In statistical 
analysis which are relevant to management 
for students with knowledge of basic statisti- 
cal methods. Topics Include evolutionary 
operation and response surface analysis, 
forecasting techniques, pathologies of the 
linear model and tfieir remedies, multivariate 
statistical models, and non-parametric 
models. 

BMGT 440 Financial Management. (3) Pre- 
requisite, BMGT 340. Analysis and discus- 
sion of cases and readings relating to finan- 
cial decisions of the firm. The application of 
finance concepts to the solution of financial 
problems is emphasized. 

BMGT 443 Security Analysis and Valua- 
tion. (3) Prerequisite, BMGT 343. Study and 
application of the concepts, methods, models, 
and empirical findings to the analysis, valua- 
tion, and selection of secuhties, especially 
common stock. 

BMGT 445 Commercial Bank Manage- 
ment. (3) Prerequisites, BMGT 340 and 



ECON 430. Analysis and discussion of cases 
and readings in commercial bank manage- 
ment. The loan function is emphasized; also 
the management of liquidity reserves, invest- 
ments for income, and source of funds. Bank 
objectives, functions, policies, organization, 
structure, services, and regulation are con- 
sidered 

BMGT 450 Marketing Research Methods. 

(3) Prerequisites, BMGT 230 and 350. Recom- 
mended that BMGT 430 be taken prior to this 
course. This course is intended to develop 
skill in the use of scientific methods in the ac- 
quisition, analysis and interpretation of market- 
ing data. It covers the specialized fields of 
marketing research; the planning of survey 
projects, sample design, tabulation proce- 
dure and report preparation. 

BMGT 451 Consumer Analysis. (3) Pre- 
requisites. BMGT 350 and 351. Recom- 
mended that PSYC 100 and 221 be taken 
prior to this course. Considers the growing 
importance of the American consumer in the 
marketing system and the need to under- 
stand him. Topics include the foundation con- 
siderations underlying consumer behavior 
such as economic, social, psychological and 
cultural factors. Analysis of the consumer in 
marketing situations-as a buyer and user of 
products and services -and in relation to the 
various individual social and marketing fac- 
tors affecting his behavior. The influence of 
marketing communications Is also consid- 
ered. 

BMGT 452 Promotion Management. (3) 

Prerequisites, BMGT 350 and 352. This 
course is concerned with the way in which 
business firms use advertising, personal sel- 
ling, sales promotion, and other methods 
as part of their marketing program. The case 
study method is used to present problems 
taken from actual business practice. Cases 
studied illustrate problems in the use and 
coordination of demand stimulation methods 
as well as analysis and planning. Research, 
testing and statistical control of promotional 
activities are also considered. 

BMGT 453 Industrial Marketing. (3) Pre- 
requisites, BMGT 350 plus one other market- 
ing course. The industrial and business sec- 
tor of the marketing system is considered 
rather than the household or ultimate con- 
sumer sector. Industrial products range from 
raw materials and supplies to the major equip- 
ment in a plant, business office, or institution. 
Topics include product planning and introduc- 
tion, market analysis and forecasting, chan- 
nels, pricing, field sales force management, 
advertising, marketing cost analysis, and 
government relations. Particular attention is 
given to industrial, business and Institutional 
buying policies and practice and to the analy- 
sis of buyer behavior. 

BMGT 454 International Marketing. (3) Pre- 
requisites, BMGT 350 plus any other market- 
ing course. A study of the marketing functons 
from the viewpoint of the international execu- 
tive. In addition to the coverage of internation- 
al marketing policies relating to product adap- 
tation, data collection and analysis, channels 
of distribution, pricing, communications, and 
cost analysis, consideration is given to the cul- 
tural, legal, financial, and organizational as- 
pects of international marketing. 



BMGT 455 Sales Management. (3) The role 
of the sales manager, both at headquarters 
and in the field, in the management of people 
resources and marketing functions. An analy- 
sis of the problems involved in sales organiza- 
tion, forecasting, planning, communicating, 
evaluating and controlling. Attention is given 
to the application of quantitative techniques 
and pertinent behavioral science concepts 
in the management of the sales effort and 
sales force. 

BMGT 460 Personnel Management- Analy- 
sis and Problems. (3) Prerequisite. BMGT 
360. Recommended, BMGT 230. Research 
findings, special readings, case analysis, 
simulation, and field investigations are used 
to develop a better understanding of person- 
nel problems, altemative solutions and their 
practical ramifications. 

BMGT 462 l^bor Legislation. (3) Case 
method analysis of the modern law of indus- 
trial relations. Cases include the decisions 
of administrative agencies, courts and arbitra- 
tion tribunals. 

BMGT 463 Public Sector Labor Relations. 

(3) Prerequisite, BMGT 362 or permission 
of instructor. Development and structure of 
labor relations in public sector employment; 
federal, state, and local government respon- 
ses to unionization and collective bargaining. 

BMGT 464 Organizational Behavior. (3) 

Prerequisite. BMGT 364. An examination of 
research and theory concerning the forces 
which contribute to the behavior of organiza- 
tional members. Topics covered include; 
work group behavior, supervisory behavior, 
intergroup relations, employee goals and at- 
titudes, communication problems, organiza- 
tional change, and organizational goals and 
design. 

BMGT 467 Undergraduate Seminar In Per- 
sonnel Management. (3) Prerequisite, con- 
sent of instructor. This course is open only 
to the top one-third of undergraduate majors 
in personnel and labor relations and is offered 
during the fall semester of each year. High- 
lights major developments. Guest lecturers 
make periodic presentations. 

BMGT 470 Land Transportation Systems. 

(3) Prerequisite, BMGT 370. Overall view of 
managerial problems facing land carriers; 
emphasis on rail and motor modes of trans- 
portation. 

BMGT 471 Air and Water Transportation 
Systems. (3) Prerequisite, BMGT 370. Over- 
all view of managerial problems facing air 
and water carriers; emphasis on international 
and domestic aspects of air and water modes 
of transportation. Not open for credit to stu- 
dents who have credit for BMGT 472. 

BMGT 473 Advanced Transportaion Prob- 
lems. (3) Prerequisite, BMGT 370. A critical 
examination of current government transpor- 
tation policy and proposed solutions. Urban 
and intercity managerial transport problems 
are also considered. 

BMGT 474 Urban Transport and Urban 
Development. (3) Prerequisite ECON 203 
or 205. An analysis of the role of urban trans- 
portation In present and future urban develop- 
ment. The interaction of transport pricing and 
service, urban planning, institutional re- 
straints, and public land uses is studied. 

Graduate Programs / 69 



BMGT 475 Advanced Logistics Manage- 
ment. (3) Prerequisites, BMGT 370, 372, 332. 
Application of the concepts of BMGT 372 to 
problem solving and special projects in logis- 
tics management; case analysis is stressed. 

BMGT 480 Legal Environment of Busi- 
ness. (3) The course examines the principal 
ideas in law stressing those which are rele- 
vant for the modem business executive. Le- 
gal reasoning as it has evolved in this country 
will be one of the central topics of study. Sev- 
eral leading antitrust cases will be studied to 
illustrate vividly the reasoning process as well 
as the interplay of businesss, philosophy, and 
the various conceptions of the nature of law 
which give direction to the process. Examina- 
tion of contemporary legal problems and pro- 
posed solutions, especially those most likely 
to affect the business community, are also 
covered. 

BMGT 481 Public Utilities. (3) Prerequisite, 
ECON 203 or 205. Using the regulated indus- 
tries as specific examples, attention is fo- 
cused on broad and general problems in such 
diverse fields as constitutional law, adminis- 
trative law, public administration, govern- 
ment control of business, advanced eco- 
nomic theory, accounting, valuation and de- 
preciation, taxation, finance, engineering, 
and management. 

BMGT 482 Business and Government. (3) 

Prerequisite. ECON 203 or 205. A study of 
the role of government in modern economic 
life. Social control of business as a remedy for 
the abuses of business enterprise arising 
from the decline of competition. Criteria of limi- 
tations on government regulation of pnvate 
enterpnse. 

BMGT 485 Advanced Production Manage- 
ment. (3) Prerequisite, BMGT 385. A study of 
typical problems encountered by the factory 
manager. The objective is to develop the 
ability to analyze and solve problems in 
management control of production and in the 
formulation of production policies. Among the 
topics covered are plant location, production 
planning and control, methods analysis, and 
time study. 

BMGT 490 Urban Land Management. (3) 

Covers the managerial and decision making 
aspects of urban land and property. Included 
are such subjects as land use and valuation 
matters. 

BMGT 493 Honors Study. (3) First semester 
of the senior year. Prerequisite, candidacy for 
honors in business and management. The 
course is designed for honors students who 
have elected to conduct intensive study (in- 
dependent or group). The student will wort< 
under the direct guidance of a faculty advisor 
and the chairman of the honors committee. 
They shall determine that the area of study 
is of a scope and intensity deserving of a can- 
didate's attention. Formal written and/or oral 
reports on the study may be required by the 
faculty advisor and/or chairman of the honors 
program. Group meetings of the candidates 
may be called at the discretion of the faculty 
advisors and/or chairman of the honors com- 
mittee. 

BMGT 494 Honors Study. (3) Second 
semester of the senior year. Prerequisite, 
BMGT 493, and continued candidacy for hon- 
ors in business and management. The stu- 

70 / Graduate Programs 



dent shall continue and complete the re- 
search initiated in BMGT 493, additional re- 
ports may be required at the discretion of the 
faculty advisor and honors program chairman. 
Group meetings may be held. 

BMGT 495 Business Policies. (3) Prerequi- 
sites, BMGT 340, 350, 364, and senior stand- 
ing. A case study course in which the aim is 
to have the student apply what they have 
learned of general management principles 
and their specialized functional applications 
to the overall management function in the 
enterprise. 

BMGT 496 Business and Society. (3) Pre- 
requisite: one course in BMGT or consent of 
instructor. Normative role of business in soci- 
ety; consideration of the sometimes conflict- 
ing interests and claims on the firm and its ob- 
jectives. 

BMGT 498 Special Topics in Business and 
Management. (3) Prerequisite: permission 
of instructor. Special topics in business and 
management designed to meet the changing 
needs and interests of students and faculty. 
Repeatable to a maiximum of six credits if 
the subject matter is different. 

BMGT 501 Business Functions. (3) Pre- 
requisite: admission to a graduate degree pro- 
gram in business. Intensive review of the man- 
agement functions in the businss enterprise, 
the development of management thought, 
and the nature of the managerial process. 
Credit not applicable towards graduate de- 
grees. 

BMGT 502 Public Policy and the Environ- 
ments of Business. (3) Prerequisite: admis- 
sion to a graduate degree program in busi- 
ness. Intensive review of the social, economic 
and legal environments of the business enter- 
prise. Credit not applicable towards graduate 
degrees. 

BMGT 503 Accounting and Information 
Systems. (3) Prerequisite: admission to a 
graduate degree program In business. Inten- 
sive review of the technical and conceptual 
aspects of financial accounting and account- 
ing information systems as they apply to the 
business enterprise. Credit not applicable 
towards graduate degrees. 

BMGT 504 Quantitative Methods and Com- 
puter Laboratory. (4) Prerequisite: admis- 
sion to a graduate degree program in busi- 
ness. Intensive review of the mathematical, 
statistical, and computer concepts, methods 
and skills requisite to the analysis of business 
problems. Credit not applicable towards grad- 
uate degrees. 

BMGT 606 Information Systems Tech- 
nology. (3) Introduction to graduate courses 
in IFSM, a survey for interested graduate stu- 
dents in other fields. The concepts, theory 
and techniques of information systems. The 
system life cycle. The role of information sys- 
tems in the management and control of the or- 
ganization. Effectiveness measures of infor- 
mation systems. Case studies of information 
systems as developed by industry and govern- 
ment. Societal impact. 

BMGT 701 Managerrtent Analysis and 
Communication. (1) Analysis of business 
problems through case studies to generate 
written and/or oral reports describing prob- 



lem definition, altemative solutions, decision 
criteria, and recommended solutions. 

BMGT 708 Special Topics in Business and 
Management. (3) Prerequisite: admission to 
graduate program in business and manage- 
ment or approval of the college program direc- 
tor. Selected advanced topics in the various 
fields of graduate study in business and 
management. With permission of the college 
program director, may be repeated to a max- 
imum of six credits provided the content is 
different. 

BMGT 710 Advanced Accounting Theory 

I. (3) The study of the theoretical and concep- 
tual foundations for generally accepted ac- 
counting principles and practices. Recent 
and current literature and ideas are studied 
in depth to provide coverage of the basic 
postulates, assumptions, and standards 
which underiie the measurement criteria and 
practices of financial accounting. 

BMGT 720 Managerial Accounting I. (3) 

The use of accounting data for corporate 
financial planning and control. Topics in- 
cluded are organization for control, profit plan- 
ning, budgeting, relevant costing, return on in- 
vestment, and administration of the controller- 
ship function in smaller organizations. BMGT 
720 or 740 is required of M.B.A. candidates. 

BMGT 721 Requirements Analysis and 
Logical Design of Information Systems. 

(3) Prerequisite: IFSM 606 or permission of 
instructor. The life cycle of an information 
processing system. The eariy part of the life 
cycle, i.e., the perception of need and the col- 
lection of requirements. Feasibility analysis 
of proposed infonnation processing systems. 
Techniques for statement of the requirements 
of an information processing system, ranging 
from the eariy industrial engineering originated 
methods to current computer-aided ones. Con- 
cepts of logical design from the synthesis 
of requirements. 

BMGT 722 The Physical Design of Infor- 
mation Systems. (3) Prerequisite: IFSM 606 
or permission of instructor. Mapping the logi- 
cal design to the available hardware and off- 
the-shelf software in the 'best' way possible. 
Human factors and social implications. 

BMGT 723 Database Technology. (3) Pre- 
requisite: IFSM 606 or permission of instruc- 
tor. The concepts, theory and models of data, 
its structure, manipulation, and storage. The 
various architectures of data management 
systems. Evaluation and selection of data- 
base systems. 

BMGT 724 Application of Management 
Methods to Information Systems. (3) Pre- 
requisites: IFSM 606, BMGT 734 or equiva- 
lent, theory and practice of management tech- 
niques from strategic planning to system 
acquisition to operation as applied to informa- 
tion systems. Methods of organizing the infor- 
mation center, allocation of chargeback poli- 
cies, performance monitoring and projection, 
security and integrity evaluation, project 
selection and staffing, outside services for 
resource leveling. 

BMGT 730 Statistical Analysis and Busi- 
ness Decisions. (3) This course acquaints 
students with the Bayesian' approach to 
decision-making. Topics include: a review of 
basic probability concepts and theorems; the 



relationship between expected utility and ra- 
tional action; incremental analysis; partial ex- 
pectations; linear profits and costs; opportu- 
nity loss and the cost of uncertainity; condi- 
tional and joint probability; the binomial, Pascal, 
poisson, gamma, and normal probability dis- 
tributions; the revision of probabilities in the 
light of new information; preposterior analysis 
and sequential decision procedures. 

BMGT 731 Theory of Survey Design. (3) 

Examines the usefulness of statistical princi- 
ples in survey design. Topics include: the na- 
ture of statistical estimation, the differential at- 
tributes of different estimators, the merits and 
weaknesses of available sampling methods 
and designs, the distinctive aspects of simple 
random samples, stratified random samples, 
and cluster samples, ratio estimates and the 
problems posed by biases and non-sampling 
errors. 

BMGT 732 Management Statistics and 
Computer Laboratory. (4) Application of sta- 
tistical concepts to solution of business prob- 
lems; laboratory use of computer packages. 

BMGT 734 Management Science and Com- 
puter Laboratory. (4) Application of manage- 
ment science concepts to solution of busi- 
ness problems; laboratory use of computer 
packages. 

BMGT 735 Application of Management 
Science. (3) Prerequisites, Bf^/IGT 734 or con- 
sent of the instructor. This course will expose 
the student to the successes and difficulties 
experienced in applying operations research 
to management decision making in all func- 
tional areas. The examination of 'classical' 
and contemporary applications in the litera- 
ture and case studies will be emphasized. 

BMGT 736 Philosophy and Practice of 
Management Science. (3) Prerequisites, 
completion of any two graduate level opera- 
tions research courses and a graduate level 
behavioral course, or consent of instructor. 

BMGT 737 Management Simulation. (3) 

Prerequisite, BMGT 734 and consent of in- 
structor. Deals with the development, manipu- 
lation, and validity of an operational model. 
Production information and other decision 
systems of concern to management will be 
studied. Ivlanipulation of parameter values, 
assumptions, and conditions are studied. 
This is accomplished in conjunction with the 
use of computer facilities at the computer 
science center on campus. 

BMGT 740 Financial Management. (3) The 

role of the financial manager in executive de- 
cision making. Financial planning, analysis, 
and control in such areas as the allocation 
of financial resources within the firm. Fore- 
casting and budgeting, capital budgeting and 
the bases for investment decisions, alternative 
sources of short-term and long-term financ- 
ing and financial problems of growth. 

BMGT 743 Investment Analysis. (3) Evalu 
ation of debt and equity security alternatives 
available for the employment of the invest- 
ment fund. Analysis of economic and finan- 
cial data of the national economy, the indus- 
try, and the company to arrive at the funda- 
mental value of a security. Study of securities 
markets as independent regulators of invest- 
ment values. Motives, needs, and basic ingre- 
dients in the selection and supervision of the 
portfolio. 



BMGT 750 Marketing Management. (3) 

Problems and goals of marketing executives; 
analysis and solution of marketing problems; 
evaluation of specific marketing efforts as 
they contribute to a coordinated total market- 
ing program. Product, price and service poli- 
cies; market characteristics; channel selec- 
tion; promotional policies and organization 
structure. 

BMGT 751 Marketing Communications 
Management. (3) Required for MBA. candi- 
dates concentrating in marketing. Concerned 
with the part that advertising, promotion, pub- 
lic relations and related efforts play in the ac- 
complishment of a firm's total marketing ob- 
jectives. Its purpose is to develop compe- 
tence in the formulation of mass communica- 
tions, objectives in budget optimization, media 
appraisal, theme selection, program imple- 
mentation and management, and results 
measurement. 

BMGT 752 Marketing Research Methods 
(3). Required for M.B.A. candidates concen- 
trating in marketing. Deals with the process of 
acquiring, classifying and interpreting pri- 
mary and secondary marketing data needed 
for intelligent, profitable marketing decisions. 
Through readings, discussion, and case stud- 
ies, efforts are made to develop skill in eval- 
uating the appropriateness of alternative 
methodologies such as the inductive, deduc- 
tive, survey, observational, and experi- 
mental. Consideration is also given to recent 
developments in the systematic recording 
and use of internal and external data needed 
for marketing decisions. 

BMGT 753 International Marketing (3). 

Deals with environmental, organizational, 
and financial aspects of international market- 
ing as well as problems of marketing re- 
search, pricing, channels of distribution, 
product policy, and communications which 
face U.S. firms trading with foreign firms or 
which face foreign firms in their operations. 

BMGT 754 Buyer Behavior Analysis (3). 

A systematic examination and evaluation of 
the literature, research tradition and theory 
of buyer behavior in the market place from a 
fundamental and applied perspective. The 
cognitive and behavioral bases underlying 
the buying process of individuals and insti- 
tutions is investigated to better understand, 
predict, and influence the process through 
the effective utilization of the firms' marketing 
resources. 

BMGT 760 Personnel Management — Man- 
power Procurement and Development. (3) 

An "in depth" treatment of problems and 
techniques involved in obtaining and de- 
veloping a competent work force, manpower 
forecasting, job analysis, time study, recruit- 
ment techniques, psychological tests, inter- 
views, application blanks, references, pro- 
grammed instruction role playing, and sensi- 
tivity training are typical topics included. 

BMGT 761 Personnel Management — Man- 
power Compensation and Evaluation. (3) 

After a work force has been assembled and 
developed (BMGT 760), the manager must 
see to it that its potential is converted into 
efficient and continuing performance. This 
course provides an "in depth" analysis of 
the role of employee compensation and ap- 
praisal in accomplishing this end. Typical top- 



ics include wage theory, incentive systems, 
wage decision criteria job evaluation, profit 
sharing, wage surveys, forced choice rating, 
critical incidents, appraisal interviews, and 
fringe benefits. 

BMGT 762 Collective Bargaining — Cur- 
rent Problems and Issues. (3) Includes 
such topics as methods of handling indus- 
trial disputes, legal restrictions on various col- 
lective bargaining activities, theory and 
philosophy of collective bargaining, and in- 
ternal union problems. 

BMGT 763 Administration of Labor Re- 
lations. (3) Deals with labor relations at the 
plant level. Emphasizes the negotiation and 
administration of labor contracts. Includes 
union policy and influence on personnnel 
management activities. 

BMGT 764 Behavioral Factors in Manage- 
ment. (3) Required of MBA. candidates. A 
critical analysis of the impact of the be- 
havioral sciences on traditional concepts of 
management as process and as organiza- 
ton. Included within the area of analysis are 
such subjects as human motivation, human 
relations, morale, status, role, organization, 
communication, bureaucracy, the executive 
role, leadership and training. 

BMGT 765 Application of Behavioral Sci- 
ence to Business. (3) Prerequisite, BMGT 
764 or permission of professor. Stresses 
case analysis of behavioral knowledge ap- 
plied to management problems. Typical 
topics include analysis of modes for introduc- 
ing change, group versus organizational 
goals, organizational barriers to per- 
sonal growth, the effect of authority systems 
on behavior, and the relationship between 
technology and social structure. 

BMGT 770 Transportation Theory and An- 
alysis. (3) Examines the transportation sys- 
tem and its components. Key topics in the 
development and present form of transporta- 
tion in both the United States and other coun- 
tries are considered together with theoretical 
concepts employed in the analysis of trans- 
port problems. 

BMGT 771 Transport and Public Policy. 

(3) An intensive study of the nature and con- 
sequences of relations between govern- 
ments and agencies thereof, carriers in the 
various modes, and users of transport ser- 
vices. Typical areas subjected to examin- 
ation and analysis include: the control of trans- 
port firms by regulatory bodies, taxation of car- 
riers, methods employed in the allocation of 
funds to the construction, operation, and 
maintenance of publicly-provided transport 
facilities, and the direct subsidization of ser- 
vices supplied by privately-owned entities. 
Additional problems considered include labor 
and safety. Comparative international trans- 
port policies and problems are also examined. 

BMGT 772 Management of Physical Distri- 
bution. (3) Focuses on managerial practices 
required to fulfill optimally the physical move- 
ment needs of extractive, manufaclunng, and 
merchandising firms. Attention is given to the 
total cost approach to physical distribution. 
Interrelations among purchased transport ser- 
vices, privately-supplied transport services. 
Warehousing, inventory control, materials 
handling, packaging, and plant location are 
considered. An understanding of the com- 

Graduate Programs / 71 



munications network to support physical dis- 
tribution is developed in conjunction witti study 
of ttie problems of coordination between the 
physical movement management function 
and other functional areas within the busi- 
ness firm -such as accounting, finance, mar- 
keting, and production. 

BMGT 773 Transportation Strategies. (3) 

Treats organization structure, policies, and 
procedures employed in the administration of 
inter- and intraurban transport firms. Prob- 
lems receiving attention include managerial 
development, operational and financial plan- 
ning and control, demand analysis, pricing, 
promotional policies, intra- and intermodal 
competitive and complementary relation- 
ships, and methods for accommodating pub- 
lic policies designed to delimit the managerial 
discretion of carrier executives. Administra- 
tive problems peculiar to publicly-owned and 
operated transport entities are also considered. 

BMGT 774 Private Enterprise and Public 
Policy. (3) Examines the executive's social 
and ethical responsibilities to his employees, 
customers and to the general public. Con- 
sideration IS given to the conflicts occasioned 
by competitive relationships in the private sec- 
tor of business and the effect of institutional 
restraints. The trends in public policy and 
their future effect upon management are ex- 
amined. For comparative purposes, several 
examples of planned societies are considered. 

BMGT 775 Product, Production and Pric- 
ing Policy. (3) Required of t\/I.B.A. candi- 
dates. The application of economic theory 
to the business enterprise in respect to the de- 
termination of policy and the handling of man- 
agement problems with particular reference 
to the firm producing a complex line of prod- 
ucts, nature of competition, pricing policy, in- 
terrelationship of production and marketing 
problems, basic types of cost, control sys- 
tems, theories of depreciation and invest- 
ment and the impact of each upon costs. 

BMGT 777 Policy Issues in Public Utilities. 

(3) A critical analysis of current developments 
in regulatory policy and issues arising among 
public utilities, regulatory agencies, and the 
general public. Emphasis is placed on the 
electric, gas, water, and communications 
industries in both the public and private sec- 
tors of the economy. Changing and emerging 
problems stressed include those pertinent to 
cost analysis, depreciation, finance, taxes, 
rate of return, the rate base, differential rate- 
making, and labor. In addition, the growing im- 
portance of technological developments and 
their impact on state and federal regulatory 
agencies are explored. 

BMGT 781 International Business Admin- 
istration. (3) Examines the international busi- 
ness environment as it affects company poli- 
cy and procedures. Integrates the business 
functions undertaken in international opera- 
tions through analysis in depth and compre- 
hensive case studies. This course can be 
credited toward the 18-hour requirement for a 
major field in D.B.A. program. 

BMGT 782 Management of the Multina- 
tional Firm, (3) Deals with the problems and 
policies of international business enterprise at 
the management level. Considers manage- 
ment of a multinational enterprise as well as 
management within foreign units. The multi- 

72 / Graduate Programs 



national firm as a socio-econometric institu- 
tion is analyzed in detail. Cases in compara- 
tive management are utilized. 

BMGT 785 Management Planning and 
Control Systems. (3) Concerned with plan- 
ning and control systems for the fulfillment of 
organizational objectives. Identification of or- 
ganizational objectives, responsibility cen- 
ters. Information needs and information net- 
work. Case studies of integrated planning 
and control systems. 

BMGT 786 Development and Trends in 
Production Management. (3) Case studies 
of production problems in a number of indus- 
tries. Focuses attention on decisions concern- 
ing operating programs and manufacturing 
policies at the top level of manufacturing. 
Basic concepts of process and product tech- 
nology are covered, taking into consideration 
the scale, operating range, capital cost, meth- 
od of conrol, and degree of mechanization 
at each successive stage in the manufactur- 
ing process. 

BMGT 790 Total Enterprise Strategy. (3) 

Case studies and research in the identifica- 
tion of management problems, the evaluation 
of alternative solutions, and the recommenda- 
tion for management implementation. 

BMGT 791 Total Enterprise Strategy-Man- 
agement Practicum. (3) Prerequisite: con- 
sent of the college's director of graduate stud- 
ies. Experiental research project in the identi- 
fication of management problems, the evalua- 
tion of alternative solutions, and the recom- 
mendation for management. 

BMGT 799 Master's Thesis Research (1-6) 

BMGT 808 Doctoral Seminar. (3) Prerequi- 
site: admission to the D.B.A. program or ap- 
proval of the college director of graduate stud- 
ies. Selected advanced topics in the various 
fields of doctoral study in business and man- 
agement. With permission of the college di- 
rector of graduate studies, may be repeated 
provided the content is different, 

BMGT 81 1 Advanced Accounting Theory 

II. (3) Prerequisite BMGT 710. A study of the 
more controversial, not generally accepted 
ideas and concepts, currently proposed as 
suggested solutions to current problems or to 
improve the state of the art of financial ac- 
counting measurements. 

BMGT 812 Accounting in Regulated Indus- 
tries. (3) A study of the unique accounting 
problems of industries subject to cost and price 
regulations of government agencies. In- 
cluded are government contracts and grants, 
rate regulations for transportation carriers 
and public utilities, distribution cost analyses 
under the Robinson-Patman Act, and cost 
regulations of the IWIedicare Program. 
BMGT 813 The Impact of Taxation on Busi- 
ness Decisions. (3) A study of the impact of 
tax law and regulations on alternative busi- 
ness strategies. Particular emphasis is given 
to the large, multidivisional firm. Problems 
of acquisitions, mergers, spinoffs, and other 
divestitures are considered from the view- 
point of profit planning, cash flow, and tax 
deferment. 

BMGT 814 Current Problems of Profes- 
sional Practice. (3) Generally accepted 
auditing standards, auditing practices, legal 
and ethical responsibilities, and the account- 



ing and reporting requirements of the secur- 
ities and exchange commission. 

BMGT 815 International Auditing. (3) Inter- 
national accounting, its problems and organi- 
zations associated with the study of the is- 
sues involved; international standards of ac- 
counting and auditing: national differences in 
accounting thought and practice. 

BMGT 821 Managerial Accounting II. (3) 

Prerequisite, BMGT 720. The management 
of the controllership function in the large, 
multidivisional firm. Centralized and decentra- 
lized organizations; management control 
systems in consolidated and conglomerate 
corporations; alternative strategies for profit 
maximization; acquisitons and divestitures 
for increased investment return. 

BMGT 828 Independent Study in Business 
and Management. (1-9) 

BMGT 830 Management Science I -Linear 
Programming. (3) Prerequisite, mathema- 
tics, through differential calculus, and BMGT 
734 or consent of instructor. The theory and 
use of deterministic models in management 
science. Models are based upon optimization 
techniques for conditions of data certainty. 
Includes linear programming models, inven- 
tory models, and replacement models. 

BMGT 831 Management Science ll-Exten- 
sion of Linear Programming and Network 
Analysis. (3) Prerequisites, BMGT 830 or 
consent of instructor, and MATH 240. Basic 
FORTRAN programming proficiency is as- 
sumed. Includes a brief review of basic linear 
programming, separable programming, appli- 
cation to game theory, the primal-dual and 
criss-cross algorithms, quadratic programming, 
basic concepts of network theory, the max- 
flow algorithms. The basic concepts and tech- 
niques of network theory will be developed 
and applied to the transportation problem. 

BMGT 832 Management Science Ill-Optim- 
ization and Nonlinear Programming. (3) 

Prerequisites, BMGT 830 or consent of in- 
structor, and MATH 241 . Topical coverage 
includes Kuhn-Tucker theory, the Lagrangena, 
the concept of an algorithm (notation map 
convergence), unconstrained problems, con- 
vex simplex and method of centers algorithms, 
penalty and barrier, feasible-directions and 
cutting plane algorithms. 

BMGT 833 Management Science IV- Integer 
and Dynamic Programming. (3) Prerequi- 
site, business -BMGT 831 and BMGT 832 
or consent of instructor. Mathematics — 
MATH 241 minimum, MATH 400 and 410 
preferred. Coverage incudes fractional, all in- 
teger and mixed integer algorithms, the knap- 
sack problem, decomposition, recusion analy- 
sis, integer optimization and sensitivity, risk and 
uncertainty situations and an introduction to 
nonserial and infinite state systems. 

BMGT 834 Probabilistic Models. (3) Pre- 
requisite, STAT 400 highly recommended. 
MATH 241 or consent of the instructor. Theo- 
retical foundations for the construction and 
optimization of probabilistic models. Follow- 
ing the review of stochastic processes, the 
Poisson process and the Markovian processes, 
topics may include queueling theory, inven- 
tory theory, Markovian decision processes 
and stochastic linear programming. 



BMGT 835 Statistical Model Building. (3) 

Prerequisites, BMGT 432, MATH 241, or con- 
sent of instructor. Emphasizes ttie actual 
construction of models encountered in and 
drawn from experience in business and man- 
agement utilizing 'canned' computer programs 
which are in wide industrial use. Topical cov- 
erage includes a review of the matrix approach 
to linear regression, effects of bias in the gen- 
eral regression situation, weighted least 
squares, or orthogonal polynomials, verifica- 
tion and maintenance of the mathematical 
model, and the introduction to non-linear es- 
timation. 

BMGT 840 Working Capital Management. 

(3) An intensive study of short- and inter- 
mediate-term sources of funds and the manage- 
ment of cash, accounts receivable and inven- 
tories. Includes consideration of determi- 
nants of working capital needs, financial an- 
alysis as related to short-term financing prob- 
lems, estimation of funds requirements, pat- 
terns of fund requirements, and major types 
of loan arrangements. Case studies, supple- 
mented with outside readings. 

BMGT 841 Long-Term Capital Manage- 
ment. (3) An intensive study of long-term 
financing, return on investment and cost of 
capital. Particular attention is paid to apprais- 
ing alternative forms of long-term financing, 
methods of measuring return on investment, 
and problems such as measuring the cost 
of capital of cyclical companies and growth 
companies. Case studies, supplemented with 
outside readings. 

BMGT 843 Portfolio Management. (3) Pre- 
requisite, BMGT 743 or consent of instructor. 
The process of investment. Selection and 
supervision of securities appropriate for the 
requirements and objectives of both the in- 
dividual and institutional investor. Underlying 
considerations necessary for the continued 
success of the investment program. Critical 
analysis of case studies in portfolio manage- 
ment. Effects of temporary changes on invest- 
ment decisions. 

BMGT 845 Financial Institutions. (3) Pro- 
vides an analysis of the structure of financial 
institutions in the American economy, includ- 
ing commercial banking and non-banking 
organizations which serve business and con- 
sumers. Topics covered include determinants 
of the demand for. and supply of, funds and 
and the role of financial institutions in chan- 
neling financial capital among the various sec- 
tors of the American economy. 

BMGT 846 International Financial Admin- 
istration. (3) Deals with the problems of finan- 
cial administration of the multinational firm. 
Includes the financing of investment abroad 
and management of assets in differing finan- 
cial environments as well as the financing 
of exports and imports. Consideration of 
national and international financial institu- 
tions as they relate to the international opera- 
tions of American and foreign business firms. 

BMGT 850 Marketing Channels Analysis. 

(3) Focuses on the fundamentals to explain 
alternate channels of distribution and the 
roles played by various intermediaries, the ev- 
olution of business structures in marketing, 
reasons for change, and projected marketing 
patterns for the future. M.B.A. candidates 
may register with permission of instructor. 



BMGT 851 Quantitative Methods in Market- 
ing-Demand and Cost Analysis. (3) Con- 
sideration is given to quantitative methods 
in the analysis and prediction of market de- 
mand and marketing costs. Topics in connec- 
tion with demand include market potentials. 
sales forecasting, consumer analysis, promo- 
tional and pricing results, and the like Cost 
analysis focuses on allocation of costs by mar- 
keting functions. Products, territories, cus- 
tomers and marketing personnel. Statistical 
techniques, mathematics, models and other 
methods are utilized in the solution of mar- 
keting problems. MBA. candidates may 
register with permission of instructor. 

BMGT 852 Theory in Marketing. (3) An in- 
quiry into the problems and elements of the- 
ory development in general with specific ref- 
erence to the field of marketing. A critical 
analysis and evaluation of past and contem- 
porary efforts to formulate theories of market- 
ing and to integrate theories from the social 
sciences into a marketing framework. Atten- 
tion is given to the development of concepts 
in all areas of marketing thought and to their 
potential application in the business firm. 

BMGT 863 The Organization and the In- 
dividual. (3) Examination of the interaction 
between organizations and individual charac- 
teristics such as personality, individual- 
values, and needs. Topics include employee 
performance, motivation, job satisfaction, ab- 
senteeism, and turnover. Evaluation of in- 
dividual differences as they influence man- 
agerial decisions. 

BMGT 864 Theory of the Industrial Work 
Group. (3) A study of major theories of group 
formation, group behavior, and group leader- 
ship considered in terms of their implications 
for the management of business and other 
types of organizations. Will involve an in- 
depth analysis of the literature concerning 
such topics as group cohesiveness, confor- 
mity, leadership, communication nets, prob- 
lem-solving efficiency, productivity standards, 
and morale. 

BMGT 865 Comparative Theories of Or- 
ganization. (3) Emphasizes business and 
other types of complex organizations. The- 
ories of formal and informal organizations are 
covered. Analyzes the content, interrelation- 
ships, and similarities between current major 
schools of organization thought. 

BMGT 866 Organizational Conflict and 
Change. (3) An analysis and evaluation of 
the factors contributing to conflict and 
changed patterns of behavior within organiza- 
tions. A study of the literature on such topics 
as managerial decision making and conflict. 
Research creativity, labor-management con- 
flict, organizational maintenance and stability, 
resistance to change, and planned change. 

BMGT 872 Business Logistics. (3) Concen 
trates on the design and application of meth- 
ods for the solution of advanced physical 
movement problems of business firms. Pro- 
vides thorough coverage of a variety of analy- 
tical techniques relevant to the solution of 
these problems. Where appropriate, experi- 
ence will be provided in the utilization of com- 
puters to assist in managerial logistical deci- 
sion-making. 

BMGT 873 Transportation Science. (3) 

Focuses on the application of quantitative 



and qualitative techniques of analysis to man- 
agenal problems drawn from firms in each of 
the various modes of transport. Included is 
the application of simulation to areas such as 
the control of equipment selection and ter- 
minal and line operations The application 
of advanced analytical techniques to prob- 
lems involving resource use efficiency within 
the transportation industry and between trans- 
portation and other sectors of the economy 
is an integral part of the course. 

BMGT 880 Business Research Methodol- 
ogy- (3) Covers the nature, scope, and appli- 
cation of research methodology The identifi- 
cation and formulaton of research designs 
applicable to business and related fields. Re- 
quired of D.B.A. students. 

BMGT 899 Doctoral Dissertation Re- 
search. (1-8) 



Chemical Engineering 
Program 

Professor and Program Director: Cadman 
Professors: Beckmann, Cadman, Gomezplata, 

Marchello, Regan, Schroeder, Silverman, 

Smith, Spain 
Associate Professors: Gentry, Spivak 
Assistant Professors: Gasner. Hatch, King 
Lecturers: Finger 

An individual plan of graduate study 
compatible witfi the student's interest and 
background is established between the 
student, his adviser, and the Depart- 
ment chairman. The general chemical 
engineenng program is focused on five 
major areas; applied polymer science, 
biochemical engineenng, environmen- 
tal engineering, high pressure tech- 
nology, process and analysis simulation. 

Admission and Degree Information 

The programs leading to the M.S. and 
Ph.D degrees are open to qualified stu- 
dents holding the B.S. degree. Admis- 
sion may be granted to students with de- 
grees in any of the engineering and sci- 
ence areas from accredited programs. 
In some cases it may be necessary to 
require courses to fulfill the background. 
The general regulations of the Graduate 
School apply in reviewing applications. 

The candidate for the M.S. degree 
has the choice of following a plan of 
study with or without thesis. The equiva- 
lent of at least three years of full-time 
study beyond the B.S. degree is required 
for the Ph.D. degree. All students seek- 
ing graduate degrees in Chemical Engi- 
neering must enroll In ENCH 610. 620, 
and 640. In addition to the general rules 
of the Graduate School certain special 
degree requirements are set forth by the 
Department in its departmental publica- 
tions. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

A number of special facilities are avail- 



Graduate Programs / 73 



able for graduate study and research 
and are coordinated through the Labor- 
atory for Radiation and Polymer Sci- 
ence, the Laboratory for High Pressure 
Science, the Laboratory for Process 
Analysis and Simulation, the Laboratory 
for Biochemical Engineering and En- 
vironmental Studies, and the Nuclear 
Reactor Facility. These laboratories 
contain analog computers, a gamma 
radiation facility, an electron accelerator, 
an electron paramagnetic resonance 
spectrometer, high pressure and cryo- 
genic systems, crystal growth and me- 
chanical testing equipment, and X-ray 
units. 

Courses 

ENCH 425 Transfer and Transport Pro- 
cesses I. (4) Prerequisite, ENCH 250. The- 
ory and applications of molecular and turbu- 
lent transport phenomena. Principles of fluid 
mechanics, mass transfer and heat transfer. 
Dimensional analysis, analogy between 
heat, mass and momentum transfer, Newto- 
nian and non-Newtonian flow, convective 
heat and mass transfer, 

ENCH 427 Transfer and Transport Pro- 
cesses M. (3) Prerequisite, ENCH 425. 
Steady and unsteady state diffusion and con- 
duction, simultaneous heat and mass trans- 
fer, interphase transfer, boundary layer the- 
ory. Application to absorption, adsorption, 
and distillation. Principles of radient heat 
transfer, evaporation, filtration, crystallization, 
drying, condensation, boiling humidificatlon, 
ion exchange, and phase separations 

ENCH 437 Chemical Engineering Labora- 
tory. (3) Prerequisite, ENCH 427, Application 
of chemical engineering process and unit op- 
eration principles in small scale semi-com- 
mercial equipment. Data from experimental 
observations are used to evaluate perfor- 
mance and efficiency of operations. Empha- 
sis is placed on correct presentation of results 
in report form. 

ENCH 440 Chemical Engineering Kinetics. 

(3) Prerequisite, ENCH 250. Fundamentals 
of chemical reaction kinetics and their applica- 
tion to the design and operation of chemical 
reactors. Reaction rate theory, homogen- 
eous reactions in batch and flow systems, 
adsorption, heterogeneous reactions and 
catalysis electrochemical reactions. Catalytic 
reactor design. 

ENCH 442 Chemical Engineering Systems 
Analysis. (3) Prerequisite: differential equa- 
tions or ENCH 453. Dynamic response ap- 
plied to process systems. Goals and modes 
of control, La Place transformations, analysis 
and synthesis of simple control systems, 
closed loop response, dynamic testing. Labor- 
atory work on methods of process control, 
use of expenmental analog and mathemati- 
cal models of control systems 

ENCH 445 Process Engineering and De- 
sign. (3) Prerequisite, ENCH 427. Utilization 
of chemical engineering principles for the de- 
sign of process equipment. Typical problems 
in the design of chemical plants. Comprehen- 
sive reports are required. 



ENCH 447 Chemical Engineering Eco- 
nomics. (2) Prerequisite, ENCH 427. Princi- 
ples of engineering economics applied to 
chemical processes. Determination of invest- 
ment and operating costs for chemical plants. 

ENCH 450 Chemical Process Develop- 
ment. (3) Prerequisite, ENCH 427. Chemical 
process industries from the standpoint of tech- 
nology, raw materials, products and process- 
ing equipment. Operations of major chemical 
processes and industnes combined with 
quantitative analysis of process require- 
ments and yields. 

ENCH 452 Advanced Chemical Engineer- 
ing Analysis. (3) Prerequisite, ENCH 425. 
Application of digital and analog computers 
to chemical engineering problems. Numeri- 
cal methods, programming, differential equa- 
tions, curve fitting, amplifiers and analog 
circuits. 

ENCH 453 Applied Mathematics in Chem- 
ical Engineering, (3) Prerequisite, MATH 
240. Mathematical techniques applied to the 
analysis and solution of chemical engineer- 
ing problems. Use of differentiation, integra- 
tion, differential equations, partial differential 
equations and integral transforms. Applica- 
tion of infinite series, numerical and statistical 
methods. 

ENCH 454 Chemical Process Analysis 
and Optimization. (3) Prerequisites, ENCH 
427, 440. Applications of mathematical mod- 
els to the analysis and optimization of chemi- 
cal processes. Models based on transport, 
chemical kinetics and other chemical engi- 
neering principles will be employed. Empha- 
sis on evaluation of process alternatives. 

ENCH 455 Chemical Process Laboratory. 

(3) Prerequisite: ENCH 427 and 440. One 
lecture and six hours of laboratory per week. 
Experimental study of various chemical pro- 
cesses through laboratory and small semi- 
commercial scale equipment. Reaction 
kinetics, fluid mechanics, heat and mass 
transfer. 

ENCH 461 Control of Air Pollution 
Sources. (3) Prerequisite, senior standing In 
engineering or consent of instructor. Theory 
and application of methods for the control 
and removal of airborne materials. Pnnciples 
of design and performance of air quality con- 
trol equipment. 

ENCH 468 Research. (1-3) Prerequisite: 
permission of the instructor. Investigation of a 
research project under the direction of a facul- 
ty member Comprehensive reports are re- 
quired. Repeatable to a maximum of six credits 

ENCH 475 Electrochemical Engineering. 

(3) Prerequisite, ENCH 425. Fundamentals 
of electrochemistry with application to engi- 
neering and commercial processes. Equilib- 
rium potentials, reaction mechanisms, cell 
kinetics, polarization, surface phenomena. 
Electrorefining, electrowinning, oxidation and 
reduction, solid, liquid and gas systems. 
Aspects of design and performance of electro- 
process plants. 

ENCH 480 Engineering Analysis of Physio- 
logical Systems. (3) Engineering descrip- 
tion and analysis of physiological systems. 
Survey of bioengineering literature and an in- 
troduction to mathematical modeling of physi- 
ological systems. 



ENCH 482 Biochemical Engineering (3) 

Prerequisite, senior standing in engineering 
or consent of instructor. Introduction to bio- 
chemical and microbiological applications to 
commercial and engineering processes, in- 
cluding Industrial fermentation, enzymology, 
ultrafiltration, food and pharmaceutical pro- 
cessing and resulting waste treatment. En- 
zyme kinetics, cell growth, energetics and 
mass transfer. 

ENCH 485 Biochemical Engineering 
Laboratory. (2) Prerequisite or co-requisite, 
ENCH 482. Techniques of measuring perti- 
nent parameters In fermentation reactors, 
quantification of production variables for pri- 
mary and secondary metabolites such as 
enzymes and antibiotics, the insolubilization 
of enzymes for reactors, and the demonstra- 
tion of separation techniques such as ultrafil- 
tration and affinity chromatography. 

ENCH 490 Introduction to Polymer Sci- 
ence. (3) Prerequisite, consent of instructor. 
The elements of the chemistry, physics, pro- 
cessing methods, and engineering applica- 
tions of polymers. 

ENCH 492 Applied Physical Chemistry of 
Polymers. (3) Prerequisite, CHEM 481 . Co- 
requisite, CHEM 482 or consent of instructor. 
Kinetics of formation of high polymers, deter- 
mination of molecular weight and structure, 
and applied thermodynamics and phase equi- 
libria of polymer solutions. 

ENCH 494 Polymer Technology Labora- 
tory. (3) Prerequisite: ENCH 490 or 492 or 
consent of instructor One lecture and two lab 
periods per week. Measurement of mechani- 
cal, electrical, optical, thermal properties of 
polymers. Measurement of molecular weight 
by viscosimetry isometric and light scattering 
methods Application of X-ray, NMR, ESR, 
spectroscopy molecular relaxation, micros- 
copy and electron microscopy to the deter- 
mination of polymer structure, effects of ultra- 
violet light and high energy radiation. 

ENCH 495 Rheology of Polymer Materials. 

(3) Prerequisite: ENCH 490 or 492 or consent 
of instructor. Mechanical behavior with em- 
phasis on the continuum point of view and Its 
relationship to structural types. Elasticity, vis- 
coelasticity. anelasticity and plasticity of sin- 
gle phase and multiphase materials. (Students 
who have credit for ENCH 495 may not take 
ENMA 495 for credit.) 

ENCH 496 Processing of Polymer Mate- 
rials. (3) Prerequisite: ENCH 490 or 492 or 
consent of instructor. A comprehensive analy- 
sis of the operations carried out on polymeric 
matenals to increase their utility. Conversion 
operations such as molding extrusion, blend- 
ing, film forming, and calendering. Develop- 
ment of engineering skills required to practice 
in the high polymer industry. Students who 
have credit for ENCH 496 may not take 
ENMA 496 for credit. 

ENCH 609 Graduate Seminar. (1) 

ENCH 610 Chemical Engineering Thermo- 
dynamics. (3) First semester. Advanced ap- 
plication of the general thermodynamic meth- 
ods to chemical engineering problems. First 
and second law consequences; estimation 
and correlation of thermodynamic proper- 
ties; phase and chemical reaction equilibria. 



74 / Graduate Programs 



ENCH 620 Methods of Engineering Analy- 
sis. (3) First semester, application of se- 
lected mathematical techniques to the analy- 
sis and solution of engineering problems: in- 
cluded are the applications of matrices, vec- 
tors, tensors, differential equations, integral 
transforms, and probability methods to such 
problems as unsteady heat transfer, transient 
phenomena in mass transfer operations, 
stagewise processes, chemical reactors, pro- 
cess control, and nuclear reactor physics. 

ENCH 630 Transport Phenomena. (3) First 
semester. Heat, mass and momentum trans- 
fer theory from the viewpoint of the basic 
transport equations. Steady and unsteady 
state; laminar and turbulent flow; boundary 
layer theory, mechanics of turbulent transport; 
with specific application to complex chemical 
engineering situations. 

ENCH 640 Advanced Chemical Reaction 
Kinetics. (3) Second semester. The theory 
and application of chemical reaction kinetics 
to reactor design. Reaction rate theory; homo- 
geneous batch and flow reactors; fundamen- 
tals of catalysis; design of heterogeneous 
flow reactors, 

ENCH 648 Special Problems in Chemical 
Engineering. (1-16) 

ENCH 655 Radiation Engineering. (3) Pre- 
requisite, permission of instructor. An analy- 
sis of such radiation applications as synthesiz- 
ing chemicals, preserving foods, control of in- 
dustrial processes. Design of irradiation in- 
stallations, e.g., cobalt 60 gamma ray 
sources, electronuclear machine arrange- 
ment, and chemical reactors. 

ENCH 656 Radiation Engineering. (3) Pre- 
requisite, permission of instructor. An analy- 
sis of such radiation applications as synthesiz- 
ing chemicals, preserving foods, control of in- 
dustrial processes. Design of irradiation instal- 
lations, e.g., cobalt 60 gamma ray sources, 
electronuclear machine arrangement, and 
chemical reactors. 

ENCH 667 Radiation Effects Laboratory. 

(3) Prerequisite, permission of instructor. Ef- 
fect of massive doses of radiation on the 
properties of matter for purposes other than 
those pointed toward nuclear power. Radia- 
tion processing, radiation-induced chemical 
reactions, and conversion of radiation ener- 
gy; isotope power sources. 

ENCH 670 Rheology of Engineering Materi- 
als. (3) Prerequisite, ENMA\650. Mechanical be- 
havior with emphasis on the continuum point 
of view and its relationship to structural types. 
Elasticity, viscoelasticity, anelasticity and 
plasticity in single phase and multiphase 
materials. 

ENCH 720 Process Analysis and Simula- 
tion. (3) Second semester. Prerequisite, 
ENCH 630. Development of mathematical 
models of chemical processes based on 
transport phenomena, chemical kinetics, and 
other chemical engineering methods. Empha- 
sis on principles of model building and simula- 
tion utilizing mathematical solutions and com- 
puter methods. 

ENCH 723 Process Engineering and De- 
sign. (3) First and second semesters. Co- 
ordination of chemical engineering and eco- 
nomics to advanced process engineering 
and design. Optimization of investment and 



operating costs. Solution of typical problems 
encountered in the design of chemical engi- 
neering plants. 

ENCH 730 Complex Equilibrium Stage Pro- 
cesses. (3) Second semester. The theory 
and application of complex equilibrium 
stages. Binary and multicomponent absorp- 
tion; extraction; Liquefaction. 

ENCH 735 Chemical Process Dynamics. 

(3) First semester. Prerequisites, differential 
equations or consent of instructor. Analysis of 
open and closed control loops and their ele- 
ments; dynamic response of processes; 
choice of variables and linkages; dynamic 
testing and synthesis; noise and dhft; chemi- 
cal process systems analysis; strategies for 
optimum operation. 

ENCH 737 Chemical Process Optimiza- 
tion. (3) Second semester. Techniques of 
modern optimization theory as applied to 
chemical engineering problems. Optimiza- 
tion of single and multivariable systems with 
and without constraints. Application of partial 
optimization techniques to complex chemical 
engineering processes. 

ENCH 761 Enzyme Engineering. (3) Pre- 
requisite, ENCH 640. Enzyme science and 
kinetics; principles of enzyme insolubilization 
and denaturation with application to design, 
operation and modeling of enzyme reactors. 
The relationship between mass transfer and 
apparent kinetics in enzyme systems; and 
techniques of separation and purification of 
enzymes. 

ENCH 762 Advanced Biochemical Engi- 
neering. (3) Prerequisite, ENCH 482 or per- 
mission of instructor. Advanced topics to in- 
clude use of a digital computer for mathemati- 
cal modeling of the dynamics of biological 
systems; separation techniques for heat sen- 
sitive biologically active materials; and trans- 
port phenomena in biological systems. 

ENCH 763 Engineering of Artificial Or- 
gans. (3) Prerequisite, ENCH 480 or permis- 
sion of instructor. Design concepts and engi- 
neering analysis of devices to supplement or 
replace natural functions; artificial kidney; 
heart assistor; membrane oxygenator; mate- 
rials problems, physiological considerations. 

ENCH 784 Polymer Physics. (3) Prerequi- 
site, ENCH 490 or consent of instructor. Appli- 
cation and correlation of mechanical and 
dielectric relaxation, NMR. electron micros- 
copy. X-ray diffraction, diffusion and electri- 
cal properties to the mechanical properties 
and structure of polymers in the solid state. 

ENCH 786 Polymer Processing and Appli- 
cations. (3) Prerequisite, ENCH 490 or con- 
sent of instructor. Application of theoretical 
knowledge of polymers to industrial pro- 
cesses. An analysis of polymerization, stabili- 
zation, electrical, rheological, thermal, mechan- 
ical and optical properties and their influence 
on processing conditions and end use appli- 
cations. 

ENCH 799 Master's Thesis Research. (1-6) 

ENCH 818 Advanced Topics in Thermo- 
dynamics. (3) Second semester. Prerequi- 
site, CHEM 604. 

ENCH 828 Advanced Topics in Chemical 
Reaction Systems. (3) First semester. Of- 
fered in alternate years. Prerequisite, ENCH 
640. 



ENCH 838 Advanced Topics in Transfer 
Theory. (3) First semester. Offered in alter- 
nate years. Prerequisite, ENCH 720. 

ENCH 848 Advanced Topics in Separation 
Processes. (3) Second semester. Offered in 
alternate years. 

ENCH 899 Doctoral Dissertation Re- 
search. (1-8) 

Chemical Physics Program 

Professor and Director: Benedict 
Professors: Benesch, De Rocco, Ginter, 

Kirsher, Zwanzig 
Visiting Professors: Tilford 
Visiting Associate Professor: Dick 
Assistant Professor: Gammon 

This curriculum is under the com- 
bined sponsorship of the Institute 
for Physical Science and 
Technology, Department of 
Chemistry, and the Department of 
Physics and Astronomy. It is design- 
ed to train students for research in 
this rapidly expanding inter- 
disciplinary field. 

Areas of study include: 
astrophysical spectroscopy, at- 
mospheric physics and chemistry, 
bioengineering, biophysics, critical 
phenomena, infrared and Raman 
spectroscopy, Intermolecular forces, 
Interstellar molecules, laser spec- 
troscopy, light scattering, liquid 
crystals, low temperature physics, 
microwave and mser spectroscopy, 
molecular structure, NMR and ESR 
spectroscopy, physics and 
chemistry at high pressure, quantum 
mechanics, reaction kinetics, solid 
state physics, statistical mechanics, 
transport phenomena, vacuum UV 
spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction. 

Admission and Degree Information 

This program Is open to graduate 
students admitted to the Depart- 
ments of Chemistry and of Physics 
and Astronomy and offers a course 
of study leading to the degrees of 
Master of Science and Doctor of 
Philosophy. Entering students are 
expected to have an undergraduate 
degree in either chemistry or 
physics with a strong bacl<ground in 
the other discipline. However, a 
mathematics or engineering major 
may also be eligible. 

The course program will be ad- 
justed to the needs of the individual 
student, who is required to pass a 
qualifying examination (a version of 
the Physics qualifier, modified to 
emphasize the atomic properties of 
matter). The successful Ph.D. stu- 

Graduate Programs / 75 



dent should end with a mastery of 
quantum mechanics, and have taken 
advanced courses in molecular 
structure (PHYS 723 or CHEM 685) 
and thermodynamics and Inter- 
molecular forces (CHEM 687 or 704). 
In keeping w/ith the interdisciplinary 
nature of the Program, 9 credits in 
Chemistry are required from 
undergraduate Physics majors; 9 
credits in Physics are required from 
undergraduate Chemistry majors. 
Research problems in chemical 
physics may be surpervised by the 
faculty in the Department of 
Chemistry, the Department of 
Physics and Astronomy, or the In- 
stitute for Physical Science and 
Technology. The program is super- 
vised by a committee from the above 
units. Courses \n\\\ be taken from 
other programs. 

The program employs an oral ex- 
amination, subsequent to the writ- 
ten, which is the defense of a 
modest research proposal. This 
feature provides two means for 
gauging the student's level of 
sophistication and understanding. 

Financial Assistance 

The degree is granted by the depart- 
ment or program of origin, that is, 
physics, chemistry, meteorology, 
etc., and financial assistance 
depends on assignment as teaching 
or research assistants with in- 
dividual departments or research 
groups. 



Chemistry Program 

Visiting Professor and Acting Ctiairman: 
McNesby 

Professors: Adier, Ammon, Breger, 
Castellan, Freeman, Goldsby, Gordon, 
Grim, Henery-Logan, Holmlund, 
Huheey, Jaqulth, Keeney', Munn, 
Picard, Ponnamperuma, Reeve, 
Rollinson, Rose, Staley, Stewart, 
Stuntz, Vanderslice, Viola 

Associate Professors: Alexander, 
Bellama, Boyd, Cannpagnoni, DeVoe, 
Hansen, Helz, Jarvis, Kasler, Khanna, 
Lal^shnnanan, Martin, Mazzocchi, 
Miller, Moore, Murphy, O'Haver, 
Sampugna, Walters, Zoller 

Assistant Professors: Alexander, 
Bergeron, Heikklnen, Rowan, Tossell 

Researctt Professor: Bailey 

Lecturer: Chaiken 

'joint appointment with Dairy Science 

The Chemistry Department offers 
programs leading to the Master of 
Science or Doctor of Philosphy 
degrees with specialization in the 

76 / Graduate Programs 



fields of analytical chemistry, bio- 
chemistry, chemical physics (in 
cooperation with the Institute of 
Physical Sciences & Technology and 
the Department of Physics and 
Astronomy), environmental 
chemistry, geochemistry, inorganic 
chemistry, nuclear chemistry, 
organic chemistry, and physical 
chemistry. The graduate program 
has been designed with maximum 
flexibility so that a student can 
achieve a strong background in his 
chosen field of specialization. 

Admission and Degree Information 

Both the thesis and non-thesis op- 
tions are offered for the M.S. degree. 
Departmental regulations concern- 
ing qualifying (diagnostic) examina- 
tions, comprehensive examinations, 
and other matters pertaining to 
course work have been assembled 
for the guidance of candidates for 
graduate degrees. Copies of these 
regulations are available from the 
Department of Chemistry. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

The Department has many special 
research facilities to support 
research in the fields given above. 
The new research wing of the chem- 
istry building houses biochemistry 
research, a centralized animal 
colony, and some of the inorganic 
and analytical chemical research. 
Nuclear chemistry facilities include 
the 140-MeV cyclotron housed in the 
Physics Department. Other facilities 
include "clean" rooms for lunar and 
environmental sample analysis, an 
electron microscope, X-ray 
fluorescence instrumentation, an 
electron microprobe, mass spec- 
trometers, NMR spectrometers in- 
cluding a 100 MHz Fourier-transform 
NMR spectrometer, ultracentrifuges, 
and analytical optical spectrometers. 
Departmental research is supported 
on two large computers in the Com- 
puter Science Building, a UNIVAC 
1100/41 and a UNIVAC 1108, both of 
which are accessible by remote 
time- sharing terminals. A variety of 
facilities including a laser laboratory, 
other electron microscopes, and an 
ESCA spectrometer are available 
through the Center of Materials 
Research on campus. The Depart- 
ment has an excellent glassblowing 
shop, a fine student faculty machine 
shop, and access to other campus 
machine shops. The Chemistry 



Library, located in the new research 
wing, has an extensive collection of 
books, journals, and abstracts in 
chemistry, biochemistry and allied 
fields. Included in the Chemistry 
Library is a computer terminal for 
literature searching. 

Financial Assistance 

Entering graduate students are nor- 
mally supported on graduate 
teaching assistantships. Their assis- 
tantships usually involve teaching 
undergraduate laboratory and recita- 
tion classes and enable the student 
to pursue a ten-credit program of 
graduate study each semester. 

Additional Infornfiation 

The Department has a brochure 
available describing its graduate pro- 
gram and the research interests of 
its faculty. For a copy of the 
brochure, or for specific information 
on graduate programs in chemistry, 
admissions procedures, or financial 
aid, contact Dr. Gerald Ray Miller, 
Associate Chairman for Graduate 
Studies and Research, Department 
of Chemistry. 

Courses 

CHEM 401 Inorganic Chemistry. (3) Three 
lectures per week. Prerequisite, CHEM 
481. 

CHEM 403 Radlochemistry. (3) Three lec- 
tures per week. Prerequisite, one year of 
college chemistry and one year of col- 
lege physics. Radioactive decay; in- 
troduction to properties of atomic nuclei; 
nuclear processes in cosmology; 
chemical, biomedical and environmental 
applications of radioactivity; nuclear pro- 
cesses as chemical tools; interaction of 
radiation with matter. 

CHEM 421 Advanced Quantitative Analy- 
sis. (3) Three lectures per week. Prereq- 
uisites, CHEM 430 and 482 or concurrent 
registration. An examination of some ad- 
vanced topics in quantitative analysis in- 
cluding nonaqueous titrations, precipita- 
tion phenomena, complex equilibria, and 
the analytical chemistry of the less 
familiar elements. 

CHEM 423 Organic Quantitative Analysis. 

(2) Two three-hour laboratory periods per 
week. Prerequisite, CHEM 203-204 or 
213-214, and consent of the instructor. 
The semi-micro determination of carbon, 
hydrogen, nitrogen, halogen and certain 
functional groups. 

CHEM 430 Chemical Measurements 
Laboratory I. (3) One lecture and two 
three-hour laboratory periods per week. 
Corequisite, CHEM 481. An introduction 
to the principles and applications of 
quantitative techniques useful in 
chemistry, with emphasis on modern in- 
strumentation, computer programming. 



electronic circuits, spectroscopy, 
chemical separations. 

CHEM 431 Chemical Measurements 
Laboratory II. (3) One lecture and two 
three-hour laboratory periods per week. 
Prerequisite, CHEM 481: corequisite, 
CHEM 482. An introduction to the prin- 
ciples and applications of quantitative 
techniques useful in chemistry, with em- 
phasis on modern instrumentation. Com- 
munications techniques, vacuum 
systems, thermochemistry, phase 
equilibria, chemical kinetics, elec- 
trochemistry. 

CHEM 433 Chemical Synthesis. (3) One 

lecture and two three-hour laboratory 
periods per week. Prerequisite: CHEM 
201-202 or 211-212. and 203-204 or 
213-214. 

CHEM 441 Advanced Organic Chemistry. 

(3) Prerequisite, CHEM 481. An advanced 
study of the compounds of carbon, with 
special emphasis on molecular orbital 
theory and organic reaction mechanisms. 

CHEM 443 Qualitative Organic Analysis 

(3) One lecture and two-three hour 
laboratory periods per week. Prere- 
quisite: CHEM 201-202 or 211-212. and 
203-204 or 213-214. The systematic iden- 
tification of organic compounds. 

CHEM 447 Geochemistry of Fuels. (3) 

Prerequisite, CHEM 104 or consent of in- 
structor. Discussion of the progenitors 
and the biochemical, chemical and 
physical agencies that convert them into 
crude oils, coals of various ranks, natural 
gas. and other organic fuels. The origin, 
composition, mineralogy, and organic 
constituents (kerogen) of oil shales. 
Mineralogy, geochemical cycles, and ac- 
cumulation of uranium and thorium. 

CHEM 461 Biochemistry I. (3) Three lec- 
tures per week. Prerequisite. CHEM 
203-204 or 213-214, or permission of in- 
structor. A comprehensive introduction 
to general biochemistry wherein the 
chemistry and metabolism of car- 
bohydrates, lipids, nucleic acids, and 
proteins are discussed. 

CHEM 462 Biochemistry II. (3) Three lec- 
tures per week. Prerequisite. CHEM 461. 
A continuation of CHEM 461. 

CHEM 463 Biochemistry Laboratory I (2) 

Two three-hour laboratory periods per 
week. Prerequisite, CHEM 461. Or con- 
current registration in CHEM 461. 

CHEM 464 Biochemistry Laboratory II (2) 

Two three-hour laboratory periods per 
week. Prerequisite. CHEM 462 or concur- 
rent registration in CHEM 462. and 
CHEM 430 or CHEM 463. 

CHEM 471 Geochemical Methods of 
Analysis. (3) Prerequisite. CHEM 103, 
104. The course will consider the prin- 
ciples and application of geochemical 
analysis as applied to a variety of 
geological problems. The topics covered 
will include x-ray and optical spec- 
troscopy, x-ray diffraction, atomic ab- 
sorption, electron microprobe and elec- 
tron microscopy. 



CHEM 473 Geochemistry of Solids. (3) 

Three lectures per week. Prerequisite, 
CHEM 482 or GEOL 422. Principles of 
crystal chemistry applied to structures, 
properties and reactions of minerals and 
non-metallic solids. Emphasis is placed 
on the relation of structural stability to 
bonding, ionic size, charge, order- 
disorder, polymorphism, and isomor- 
phism. 

CHEM 474 Environmental Chemistry. (3) 

Three lectures per week. Prerequisite. 
CHEM 481. or equivalent. The sources of 
various elements and chemical reactions 
between them in the atmosphere and 
hydrosphere are treated. Causes and 
biological effects of air and water pollu- 
tion by certain elements are discussed. 

CHEM 476 Geochemistry of the 
Biosphere. (3) Prerequisite, two years of 
chemistry including one year of either 
organic or physical chemistry. Three lec- 
tures per week. An interdisciplinary ap- 
proach involving inorganic, organic, 
physical, and biochemistry to integrate 
the available information necessary to in- 
terpret and explain the major aspects of 
the geochemistry of the biosphere. 

CHEM 481 Physical Chemistry 1. (3) Three 
lectures per week. Prerequisite. CHEM 
203-204 or 213-214. MATH 141. PHYS 142 
or PHYS 263 (PHYS 263 may be taken con- 
currently with CHEM 481) or consent of in- 
structor. A course primarily for chemists 
and chemical engineers. 

CHEM 482 Physical Chemistry II. (3) Three 
lectures per week. Prerequisite. CHEM 
481. or consent of instructor. A course 
primarily for chemists and chemical 
engineers. 

CHEM 485 Advanced Physical Chemistry. 

(2) Prerequisite. CHEM 482. Quantum 
chemistry and other selected topics. 

CHEM 486 Advanced Physical Chemistry 
Latx>ratory. (2) Two three-hour laboratory 
periods per week. Prerequisites, CHEM 
482 and consent of instructor. 

CHEM 498 Special Topics in Chemistry, 

(3) Three lectures or two lectures and one 
three-hour laboratory per week. Prereq- 
uisite varies with the nature of the topic 
being considered. Course may be 
repeated for credit if the subject matter is 
substantially different, but not more than 
three credits may be accepted in satisfac- 
tion of major supporting area re- 
quirements for chemistry majors. 

CHEM 601 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry 

I. (3) Prerequisite. CHEM 401 or equivalent. 
Three lectures per week. A survey of the 
fundamentals of modern inorganic 
chemistry which serves as a basis for 
more advanced work. 

CHEM 602 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry 

II. (3) Prerequisite, CHEM 601. Three lec- 
tures per week. A continuation of CHEM 
601 with more emphasis on current work 
in inorganic chemistry. 

CHEM 603 Advanced Inorganic 
Laboratory. (3) Prerequisite. CHEM 601 or 
concurrent registration therein. One lec- 
ture and two three-hour laboratories per 



week. Practice in synthesis and modem 
experimental techniques in inorganic 
chemistry. 

CHEM 605 Chemistry of Coordination 
Compounds (3) Prerequisite, CHEM 601 or 
consent of instructor. Three lectures per 
week. Structure and properties of coor- 
dination compounds and the theoretical 
bases on which these are interpreted. 

CHEM 606 Chemistry of Organometallic 
Compounds (3) Prerequisite, CHEM 601 or 
consent of instructor. Three lectures per 
week. An in-depth treatment of the proper- 
ties of compounds having metal-cartx>n 
tXDnds. 

CHEM 608 Selected Topics in Inorganic 
Chemistry. (1-3) Prerequisite. CHEM 601 
and 602. or equivalent. One to three lec- 
tures per week. Topics of special interest 
and current importance. Course may be 
repeated to a maximum of six credits if 
topics are different. 

CHEM 621 Chemical Microscopy I. (2) One 

lecture and one three hour laboratory 
period per week. Registration limited. 
Prerequisite, consent of instructor. A 
study of the use of the microscope in 
chemistry. 

CHEM 622 Chemical Microscopy II. (2) 

One lecture and one three hour laboratory 
period per week. Prerequisite, CHEM 621. 
A study of the optical properties of 
crystals. 

CHEM 623. Optical Methods of Quan- 
titative Analysis. (3) Two lectures and one 
three-hour laboratory per week. Prereq- 
uisites. CHEM 421 and 482. The quan- 
titative applications of emission spec- 
troscopy, atomic absorption spec- 
troscopy, ultraviolet, visible, and infrared 
spectrophotometry, fluorescence, atomic 
fluorescence, nephelometry. and of cer- 
tain closely related subjects like NMR and 
mass spectroscopy. 

CHEM 624 Electrical Methods of Quan- 
titative Analysis. (3) Two lectures and one 
three-hour laboratory per week. Prereq- 
uisites. CHEM 421 and 482. The use of 
conductivity, potentiometry, polarography, 
voltammetry, amperometry, coulometry, 
and chronopotentiometry in quantitative 
analysis. 

CHEM 625 Separation Methods in Quan- 
titative Analysis. (3) Two lectures and one 
three-hour laboratory per week. Prereq- 
uisites. CHEM 421 and 482. The theory 
and practical application to quantitative 
analysis of the various forms of 
chromatography, ion exchange, solvent 
extraction, and distillation. 

CHEM 628 Modem Trends in Analytical 
Chemistry. (2) Two lectures per week. 
Prerequisites. CHEM 421 and 482. A study 
of advanced methods, including topics 
such as statistical treatment of analytical 
data, kinetic methods in analytical 
chemistry, analytical measurements 
based on radioactivity, and enzymatic 
techniques. 

CHEM 641 Organic Reaction Mechanisms. 
(3) Three lectures per week. 



Graduate Programs / 77 



CHEM 642 Physical Organic Chemistry. (3) 

Three lectures per week. 

CHEIVI 643 Organic Chemistry of High 
Polymers (2) Two lectures per week. An 
advanced course covering the synthesis 
of monomers, mechanisms of polymeriza- 
tion, and the correlation between struc- 
ture and properties in high polymers. 
CHEM 644 Molecular Orbital Theory. (2) 
Two lectures per week. A partial quan- 
titative application of molecular orbital 
theory and symmetry to the chemical 
properties and reactions of organic 
molecules. Prerequisites, CHEM 441 and 
482. 

CHEM 645 The Chemistry of the Steroids. 
(2) Two lectures per week. 
CHEM 646 The Heterocyclics. (2) Two 
lectures per week. 

CHEM 648 Special Topics in Organic 
Chemistry. (1-3) One to three lecture 
hours per week. Topics of special in- 
terest and current importance. Course 
may be repeated to a maximum of nine 
credits provided the topics are different. 

CHEM 661 Proteins, Amino Acids, and 
Carbohydrates. (2) Two lectures per 
week. Prerequisite, CHEM 462 or 
equivalent. 

CHEM 662 Biological Energy Transduc- 
tions, Vitamins, and Hormones. (2) Two 

lectures per week. Prerequisite, CHEM 
462 or equivalent. 

CHEM 663 Enzymes. (2) Two lectures per 
week. Prerequisite, CHEM 462 or 
equivalent. 

CHEM 664 The Chemistry of Natural 
Products. (2) Two lectures per week. 
Prerequisite, CHEM 441. The chemistry 
and physiological action of natural prod- 
ucts. Methods of isolation, determination 
of structure and synthesis. 
CHEM 665 Biochemistry of Lipids. (2) 
Two lectures per week. Prerequisite, 
CHEM 462 or equivalent. Classification 
and chemistry of lipids, lipogenesis and 
energy metabolism of lipids, structural 
lipids, and endocrine control of lipid 
metabolism in mammals. 

CHEM 666 Biophysical Chemistry. (2) 

Two lectures per week. Prerequisite, 
CHEM 461 and 482, or consent of in- 
structor. 

CHEM 668 Special Problems in 
Biochemistry. (2-4) Two to four three-hour 
laboratory periods per week. Prereq- 
uisite, CHEM 464 or equivalent. 

CHEM 669 Special Topics in 
Biochemistry. (2) Two lectures per week. 
Prerequisite, CHEM 462 or equivalent. 

CHEM 678 Special Topics In Environmen- 
tal Chemistry. (3) Prerequisite - chemistry 
474. In-depth treatment of environmental 
chemistry problem areas of current 
research interest. The topics will vary 
somewhat from year to year. Repeatable 
to maximum of 6 credits, provided sub- 
ject is different. 

CHEM 681 InfraRed and Raman Spec- 
troscopy. (2) Two lectures per week. 
Prerequisite, consent of instructor. 

78 / Graduate Programs 



CHEM 682 Reaction Kinetics. (3) Three 
lectures per week. 

CHEM 683 Electrochemistry. (3) Three 
lectures per week. Prerequisite, CHEM 
684 or equivalent. 

CHEM 684 Chemical Thermodynamics. 

(3) Three lectures per week. Prerequisite, 
CHEM 482 or equivalent. 

CHEM 685 Molecular Structure. (3) Three 
lectures per week. 

CHEM 686 Chemical Crystallography. (3) 

Three lectures per week. Prerequisite, 
consent of instructor. A detailed treat- 
ment of single-crystal x-ray methods. 

CHEM 687 Statistical Mechanics and 
Chemistry. (3) Three lectures per week. 
Prerequisite, CHEM 684 or equivalent. 

CHEM 688 Selected Topics in Physical 
Chemistry. (2) Two lectures per week. 

CHEM 689 Special Topics in Physical 
Chemistry. (3) Three lectures per week. 

CHEM 690 Quantum Chemistry I. (3) 

Three lectures per week. Prerequisite, 
CHEM 485. 

CHEM 691 Quantum Chemistry II. (3) 

Three lectures per week. Prerequisite, 
CHEM 690 or PHYS 622. 

CHEM 699 Special Problems in 
Chemistry. (1-6) Prerequisite, one 
semester of graduate study in chemistry. 
Laboratory experience in a research en- 
vironment. Restricted to students in the 
non-thesis M.S. option. Repeatable for a 
maximum of 6 credits. 

CHEM 702 Radiochemistry Laboratory. 
(1-2) One or two four-hour laboratory 
periods per week. Registration limited. 
Prerequisites, CHEM 403 (or concurrent 
registration therein), and consent of in- 
structor. 

CHEM 703 Advanced Radiochemistry. (2) 

Two lectures per week. Prerequisite, 
CHEM 403 and CHEM 462. Utilization of 
radioisotopes with special emphasis on 
applications to problems in the life 
sciences. 

CHEM 704 Advanced Radiochemistry 
Laboratory. (1-2) One or two four-hour 
laboratory periods per week. Prereq- 
uisite, CHEM 702 and consent of instruc- 
tor. Laboratory training in the utilization 
of radioisotopes with special emphasis 
on applications to problems in the life 
sciences. 

CHEM 705 Nuclear Chemistry. (3) 

Nuclear structure models, radioactive 
decay processes, nuclear reactions in 
complex nuclei, fission, nucleosynthesis 
and nuclear particle accelerators. 

CHEM 718 Special Topics in Nuclear 
Chemistry. (1-3) One to three lectures per 
week. A discussion of current research 
problems. Subtitles will be given at each 
offering. Repeatable for credit to a maxi- 
mum of six hours. 

CHEM 721 Organic Geochemistry. (3) 
Three lectures per week. Prerequisite, 
CHEM 201 or equivalent. A discussion of 
the fate of natural organic products in 
the geological environment. The in- 



fluence of diagenetic factors, such as 
hydrolysis, heat, pressure, etc., on such 
compounds as cellulose, lignin, proteins, 
and lipids, detailed consideration of the 
origin of soil organic matter, car- 
bonaceous shales, coal, and crude oil. 

CHEM 722 Cosmochemistry. (3) Three 

lectures per week. Prerequisite, CHEM 
482 or equivalent. Current theories of 
origin and evolution of the solar system 
with emphasis on the experimental data 
available to chemists from examination 
of meteorites, the moon, and the earth. 

CHEM 723 Marine Geochemistry. (3) 

Three lectures per week. Prerequisite, 
CHEM 481 or equivalent. The 
geochemical evolution of the ocean; 
composition of sea water, density- 
chlorinity-salinity relationship and carbon 
dioxide system. The geochemistry of 
sedimentation with emphasis on the 
chemical stability and inorganic and 
biological production of carbonate, 
silicate and phosphate containing 
minerals. 

CHEM 727 Geochemical Differentiation. 
(3) Distribution of the chemical elements 
in the earth and the mechanisms by 
which the distributions came about. 

CHEM 728 Selected Topics in Analytical 
Geochemistry. (2-3) One or two lectures 
per week and one laboratory per week. 
Prerequisite, consent of instructor. This 
course will be subtitled each time it is of- 
fered to indicate the analytical method 
discussed. Repeatable for credit to a 
maximum of nine hours. Enrollment will 
be limited. 

CHEM 729 Special Topics in Geo- 
chemistry. (1-3) One to three lectures 
per week. A discussion of current 
research problems. Subtitles will be 
given at each offering. Repeatable for 
credit to a maximum of six hours. 

CHEM 750 Chemical Evolution. (3) Pre- 
requisite, CHEM 441, 462, 721; or ZOOL 
446; or BOTN 616; or consent of instruc- 
tor. The chemical processes leading to 
the appearances of life on earth. Theo- 
retical and experimental considerations 
related to the geochemical, organic, and 
biochemical phenomena of chemical 
evolution. 

CHEM 799 Master's Thesis Research 

(1-6). 

CHEM 898 Seminar (1). 

CHEM 899 Doctoral Dissertation 

Research (1-8). 



Civil Engineering Program 

Professor and Chairman: Carter 
Professors: Birkner, Heins, Lepper, Otts, 

Ragan, Sternberg. 
Associate Professors: Albrecht, Colville, 

Cournyn, Garber, Hall, McCuen, Piper, 

Wedding, Witczak. 
Assistant Professors: Aggour, Derucher, 

Mulinazzi, Schelling, Vannoy. 

The Departnnent of Civil Engineering 
offers graduate work leading to the 



degrees of Master of Science and 
Doctor of Philosophy. All programs 
are planned on an individual basis by 
the student and his advisor to con- 
sider the student's background and 
special interests. Courses and 
research opportunities are available 
in the general areas of transporta- 
tion and urban systems, environmen- 
tal engineering and water resources, 
structural engineering, and soil 
mechanics. In general, emphasis is 
on learning sound engineering prin- 
ciples and applying them, to provide 
for the needs of man. 

Admission and Degree Information 

Applicants for admission should 
hold a B.S. degree in Civil Engineer- 
ing. However, applicants with 
undergraduate degrees in other 
disciplines may be accepted with 
the stipulation that deficiencies in 
prerequisite undergraduate course 
work be corrected before enrolling in 
graduate courses. There are no en- 
trance examinations required for the 
program. 

Two options are available for the 
Master of Science degree: thesis 
and non-thesis. The Department's 
policies and requirements are the 
same as the requirements of the 
Graduate School. 

The requirements for the Doctor 
of Philosophy degree are the same 
as those imposed by the Graduate 
School. An individual program of 
study to suit the needs of the stu- 
dent is developed by the student and 
his advisor. The equivalent of two 
years of full-time study beyond the 
Master of Science degree is the 
minimum requirement. The student 
must pass a qualifying examination 
before being admitted to candidacy. 
Normally, the qualifying exam is 
taken one year after the completion 
of the M.S. degree. There is no 
language requirement for the Ph.D. 
degree. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

The research facilities of the Depart- 
ment are available to graduate 
students. These include laboratories 
in the following areas; transporta- 
tion, systems analysis, environmen- 
tal, hydraulics, structures, and soil 
mechanics. A UNIVAC 1106 and a 
UNIVAC 1108, complemented by 
remote access units located in the 
engineering building, are available. 
The Washington and Baltimore 



Metropolitan Areas are easily ac- 
cessible for data, field studies, 
library access, contacts with na- 
tional organizations and attendance 
at national meetings. The location of 
the University of Maryland offers a 
unique opportunity to obtain an ad- 
vanced degree in Civil Engineering. 

Financial Assistance 

Almost all full-time graduate stu- 
dents receive financial assistance. 
Inquiries about financial assistance 
and program information should be 
directed to the Director of Graduate 
Studies, Department of Civil 
Engineering. 

Courses 

ENCE 410 Advanced Strength of 
Materials. (3) Prerequisite, ENES 220. 
Strength and deformation of deformable 
bodies, plane stress and strain. Torsion 
theory, unsymmetical bending, curved 
beams. Behavior of beams, columns, 
slabs, plates and composite members 
under load. Elastic and inelastic stability. 

ENCE 411 Experimental Stress Analysis. 

(4) Three lectures and one laboratory per 
week. Prerequisite, ENES 220. Applica- 
tion of experimental data on materials to 
design problems. Correlation of 
analytical and experimental methods of 
analysis w\h design. Electric strain 
gages, photoelasticity, brittle lacquer 
methods and various analogies. 

ENCE 420 Basic Civil Engineering Plan- 
ning I. (3) Prerequisites — senior stand- 
ing or consent of the instructor. Urban- 
regional physical planning from the civil 
engineering view-point. Integration of the 
planning aspects of engineering — en- 
vironmental, structural, transportation 
and water resources — into a system ap- 
proach to the practice of civil engineer- 
ing. Also included: site, construction, 
and engineering materials planning, 
engineering economics and evaluation, 
current topics. 

ENCE 430 Intermediate Fluid Mechanics 

(4) Three lectures and one laboratory per 
week. Prerequisite — ENCE 330. Applica- 
tion of basic principles to the solution of 
engineering problems: ideal fluid flow, 
mechanics of fluid resistance, open 
channel flow under uniform, gradually 
varied and rapidly varied conditions, sedi- 
ment transport, role of model studies in 
analysis and design. 

ENCE 431 Surface Water Hydrology. (3) 

Prerequisites, ENCE 330 and 360. Con- 
current registration in ENCE 460 or per- 
mission of instructor. Study of the 
physical processes of the hydrologic cy- 
cle. Hydrometology, concepts of weather 
modification, evaporation and transpira- 
tion infiltration studies, run off computa- 
tions, flood routing, reservoir re- 
quirements, emphasis on process 
simulation as a tool in water resource 
development. 



ENCE 432 Ground Water Hydrology. (3) 

Prerequisites, ENCE 330, 460 or permis- 
sion of instructor. Concepts related to 
the development of the ground water 
resource, hydrogeology, hydrodynamics 
of flow through porous media, hydraulics 
of wells, artificial recharge, sea water in- 
trusion, basin-wide ground water 
development. 

ENCE 433 Environmental Health 
Engineering Analysis. (3) Two lectures 
and one laboratory per week. The theory 
and analytical techniques used in 
evaluating man's environment. Emphasis 
is given to the areas of quantitative, 
physical, electroanalytical and organic 
chemistry as applied to chemical 
analysis of water. 

ENCE 434 Air Pollution. (3) Classification 
of atmospheric pollutants and their ef- 
fects on visibility, inanimate and animate 
receptors. Evaluation of source emis- 
sions and principles of air pollution con- 
trol: meteorological factors governing 
the distribution and removal of air 
pollutants: air quality measurements and 
air pollution control legislation. 

ENCE 435 Sanitary Engineering Analysis 
and Design. (4) Three lectures and one 
laboratory per week. Prerequisite, ENCE 
221 and ENCE 330. The application of 
sanitary analysis and fundamental prin- 
ciples to the design and operation of 
water and waste water treatment plants 
and the control of stream pollution. 

ENCE 440 Advanced Soil Mechanics. (4) 

Three lectures and one laboratory per 
v/eek. Prerequisite, ENCE 340. Theories 
of strength, compressibility, capillarity 
and permeability. Critical review of 
theories and methods of measuring 
essential properties. Planning, execution 
and interpretation of soil testing pro- 
grams. 

ENCE 441 Soil-Foundation Systems. (3) 
Prerequisite, ENCE 340. Soil mechanics 
and foundation analysis are integrated in 
a systems approach to the analysis and- 
design soil foundation-structural 
systems. Interaction of bearing capacity, 
settlements, lateral pressures, drainage, 
vibrations, stress distributions, etc., are 
included for a variety of structural 
systems. 

ENCE 450 Design of Steel Structures. (3) 
Prerequisites. ENCE 350 and concurrent 
registration in ENCE 351. Analyses for 
stresses and deflections in structures by 
methods of consistent deformations, vir- 
tual work and internal strain energy. Ap- 
plication to design of plate girders, in- 
determinate and continuous trusses, two 
hinged arches and other structures. 
Elements of plastic analysis and design 
of steel structures. 

ENCE 451 Design of Concrete Struc- 
tures. (4) Prerequisites, ENCE 340 and 
ENCE 351. Three lecture hours and one 
laboratory per week. Design of reinforced 
concrete structures, including slabs, 
footings, composite members, building 
frames, and retaining walls. Approximate 
methods of analysis: code requirements: 
influence of concrete properties on 



Graduate Programs / 79 



strength and deflection; optimum design. 
Introduction to prestressed concrete 
design. 

ENCE 460 Modem Techniques for Struc- 
tural Analysis. (3) Prerequisites, ENCE 
351, and ENCE 360. Two lecture hours 
and one laboratory per week. Application 
of computer oriented methods and 
numerical techniques to analysis and 
design of structural systems. Matrix for- 
mulation of the stiffness and flexibility 
methods for framed structures. Introduc- 
tion of numerical techniques to the solu- 
tion of selected problems in such topics 
as plates, structural stability, and vibra- 
tions. 

ENCE 461 Analysis of Civil Engineering 
Systems I (3) Prerequisite, senior stand- 
ing or consent of instructor. Application 
of the principles of engineering economy 
and statistics to the solution of civil 
engineering problems. Economic com- 
parison of alternatives using present 
worth, annual cost, rate of return and 
cost benefit analyses. Development and 
use of simple and multiple regression 
models, and statistical decision theory. 

ENCE 463 Engineering Economics and 
System Analysis. (3) Prerequisite, senior 
standing in engineering, or consent of in- 
structor. Development and application of 
the principles of engineering economics 
to problems in civil engineering. Evalua- 
tion of design alternatives, depreciation 
and sensitivity analysis. Use of systems 
analysis techniques, including CPM, pert 
and decision networks. 

ENCE 470 HIgfiway Engineering. (4) 

Three lectures and one three-hour 
laboratory per week. Prerequisite — 
ENCE 340. Location, design, construc- 
tion and maintenance of roads and 
pavements. Introduction to traffic 
engineering. 

ENCE 471 Transportation Engineering. (3) 

Prerequisite, ENCE 370. A study of the 
principles of transportation engineering 
as applied to the various modes of 
transport. Consideration is given to cost 
analysis, economic aspects of route and 
site selection and layout. The organiza- 
tion and administration of engineering 
functions. 

ENCE 472 Higfiway and Airfield Pave- 
ment Design. (3) Prerequisites, ENCE 340 
and 370. Two lectures and one laboratory 
per week. Principles of pavement 
analysis and design. Analysis of moving 
loads and pavement response. Subgrade 
evaluation and beneficiation. Flexible 
and rigid pavement design; related 
materials specifications and tests. 

ENCE 489 Special Problems. (3) Prereq- 
uisite, senior standing. A course ar- 
ranged to meet the needs of exceptional- 
ly well prepared students for study in a 
particular field of civil engineering. 

ENCE 600 Advanced Engineering 
Materials Lat>oratory. (3) Prerequisites, 
ENES 220, 221 and ENCE 300 or 
equivalent. Critical examination of the 
methods for testing engineering 
materials and structures under static, 



repeated, sustained and impact forces. 
Laboratory experiments for the deter- 
mination of strength and stiffness of 
structural alloys, concrete and other con- 
construction materials. Critical examina- 
tion of the effects of test factors on the 
determination of engineering properties. 

ENCE 601 Structural Materials and 
Design. (3) Prerequisite, ENCE 410 and 
41 1 or consent of instructor. Relation of 
structural analysis, properties of 
materials and laboratory study of the 
behavior of members to structural design 
methods, codes and specifications. Ef- 
fects of temperature, loading rates and 
state of combined stress on behavior of 
construction materials. 

ENCE 603 Theories of Concrete and 
Granular Materials. (3) Prerequisites, 
ENCE 600, or consent of instructor. 
Critical reviews of analytical and ex- 
perimental investigations of the behavior 
of concretes under diverse conditions of 
loading and environment. Mechanics of 
granular aggregates and the chemistry of 
cements. Theories of the design of 
Portland cement and field experience. 

ENCE 610 Advanced Strength of 
Materials. (3) Prerequisites, ENES 220, 
221 and ENCE 300, or equivalent. 
Analysis for stress and deformation in 
engineering members by the methods of 
mechanics of materials and elementary 
theories of elasticity and plasticity. Prob- 
lems in flexure, torsion plates and shells, 
stress concentrations, indeterminate 
combinations, residual stresses, 
stability. 

ENCE 612 Structures Research Methods 
and Model Analysis. (3) Prerequisite: 
ENCE 450 and ENCE 451 or equivalent in- 
strumentation, data analysis; states of 
stress: structural models, structural 
similitude; analogies; non-destructive 
testing techniques: planning research 
projects, lab studies and reports. 

ENCE 620 Urban-Regional Civil Engineer- 
ing Planning. (3) First semester. Prereq- 
uisite, degree in civil engineering or con- 
sent of instructor. Theory and method- 
ology for the synthesis of general civil 
engineering aspects of urban and 
regional planning. Integration of land use 
conditions and capabilities. Population 
factors and needs, engineering econom- 
ics and engineering technologies. Ap- 
plication to special problems in urban- 
regional development. Preparation of 
engineering reports. Presentation 
methods. 

ENCE 621 Civil Engineering Planning. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, ENCE 
620 or equivalent. General to comprehen- 
sive planning of complex engineering 
facilities such as industrial plants, 
bridges, utilities and transportation proj- 
ects. Planning based on the synthesis of 
all applicable factors. Emphasis on 
general civil engineering planning in- 
cluding site, structural and construction 
planning. Plan evaluation and feasibility. 

ENCE 622 Urban and Regional Systems 
Analysis. (3) Prerequisite or corequisite, 
ENCE 461 or consent of instructor. Cur- 



rent applications and research ap- 
proaches in land-use forecasting. Land- 
use evaluation, urban transportation, 
land-use interrelationships, and the 
planning implementation process in a 
systems analytic framework. 

ENCE 630 Analysis and Design of Water 
Resource Systems. (3) Prerequisite, 
ENCE 461 or equivalent. Use of advanced 
techniques for the design and analysis of 
complex, multi-purpose water resource 
systems; identification of the objectives 
of design and translation of the objec- 
tives into design criteria; evaluation of 
alternate designs and the selection of 
the best design: special emphasis on op- 
timization and simulation techniques 
which are applicable to water resource 
systems. 

ENCE 631 Advanced Hydrologic 
Analysis. (3) Emphasis is on the analysis 
of hydrologic data for the development 
of information necessary for design or 
for the identification of important pro- 
cesses: eigenvalue and eigenvector 
analysis of linear hydrologic systems: ap- 
plication of multivariant statistical 
methods; non-linear least squares. 

ENCE 632 Free Surface Flow. (3) Prereq- 
uisite ENCE 330 or equivalent. Applica- 
tion of fundamentals of fluid mechanics 
to problems of free surface flow; com- 
putation of steady and transient water 
surface profiles; stratified flows in reser- 
voirs and estuaries; diffusion; transition 
structures; sediment transport. 
ENCE 633 The Chemistry of Natural 
Waters. (4) Prerequisite, ENCE 433 or 
consent of instructor. Three lectures, 
one lab a week. Application of principles 
from chemical thermodynamics and 
kinetics to the study and interpretation 
of the chemical characteristics of natural 
water systems. The chemical composi- 
tion of natural waters is rationalized by 
considering metal ion solubility controls, 
PH, carbonate equilibria, absorption reac- 
tions, redox reactions, and the kinetics 
of oxygenation reactions which occur in 
natural water environments. 

ENCE 634 Air Sampling and Analysis. (3) 

Prerequisite, ENCE 434 or consent of in- 
structor. Two lectures and one laboratory 
a week. The theory and techniques used 
in the determination and measurement of 
chemical, radiological, and biological 
pollutants in the atmosphere. Discussion 
of air sampling equipment, analytical 
methods and data evaluation. 

ENCE 635 Design of Water Purification 
Facilities. (3) Corequisite, ENCE 636 or 
equivalent. One lecture and two 
laboratory periods a week. Application of 
basic science and engineering science to 
design of water supply and purification 
processes: design and economics of unit 
operations as applied to environmental 
systems. 

ENCE 636 Unit Operations of En- 
vironmental Health Engineering. (3) Pre- 
requisite, ENCE 221 or consent of in- 
structor. Properties and quality criteria of 
drinking water as related to health are in- 
terpreted by a chemical and biological 



80 / Graduate Programs 



approach. Legal aspects of water use 
and handling are considered. Theory and 
application of aeration, sedimentation, 
filtration, centrifugation, desalinization, 
corrosion and corrosion control are 
among topics to be considered. 

ENCE 637 Biological Principles of En- 
vironmental IHealth Engineering.(4) Pre- 
requisite, MICB 440 or equivalent. Three 
lectures and one lab period a week. An 
exposition of biological principles direct- 
ly affecting man and his environment: 
assay, control and treatment of 
biological and virological agents in water, 
sewage, and air: microbiology and bio- 
chemistry of aerobic and anerobic treat- 
ment processes for aqueous wastes. 

ENCE 640 Soil IMechanics. (3) Prereq- 
uisites, ENCE 340, 440 or equivalent. 
Identification properties tests and 
classification methods for earth 
materials. Strength and deformation 
characteristics, hydraulic properties and 
permeability, shearing resistance, com- 
pressibility and consolidation, with 
laboratory tests for these properties. 
Study of the basic theories involved and 
the development of test procedures. 

ENCE 641 Advanced Foundations. (3) 

Prerequisites, ENCE 340, 450 and 451 or 
equivalent. Principles of mechanics ap- 
plied to engineering problems in founda- 
tion. Earth pressure theories, seepage 
and drainage phenomena, stability of 
footings and slopes, stresses and defor- 
mation in soils. Consolidation theory and 
application to foundation settlements. 

ENCE 651 Matrix Methods of Structural 
Analysis. (3) Review of basic structural 
and matrix theory. Development of force 
and displacement methods with em- 
phasis on the latter. Discussion of 
special topics such as geometric non- 
linearity, automated and optimum design 
non-prismatic members and thin-walled 
open sections and sub-division of large 
structures. Emphasis on applications to 
civil engineering structures. 

ENCE 652 Analysis of Plate and Shell 
Structures. (3) Prerequisites: ENCE 410 
and ENCE 381 or equivalent; review of 
theory of elasticity and in-plane forces: 
theory of orthotropic plates: approximate 
methods: large deflection theory, buck- 
ling^^eneral theory of shells, cylindrical 
shells, domes. 

ENCE 655 Plastic Analysis and Design of 
Structures. (3) Prerequisite, permission 
of instructor. The study of the factors ef- 
fecting the plastic behavior of steel 
structures and the criteria necessary for 
design. The design of beams, rigid 
frames and multi-story braced frames 
using current specifications. A review of 
current research and practice. 

ENCE 656 Advanced Steel Design (3) Pre- 
requisite: ENCE 450 and ENCE 451 or 
equivalent interpretation of specifica- 
tions and codes for the design of steel 
buildings and bridges. Discussion of the 
behavior of steel connections, members 
and structures: the relationship between 
behavior and design specifications. 



ENCE 657 Theory of Structural Design. 

(3) Prerequisite, ENCE 656. Correlation of 
theory, experience, and experiments in 
study of structural behavior, proportion- 
ing, and preliminary design. Special 
design problems of fatigue, buckling, vi- 
brations, and impact. 

ENCE 660 Engineering Analysis. (3) 

ENCE 661 Finite Element Techniques in 
Engineering Analysis. (3) Prerequisite, 
consent of instructor. Basic principles 
and fundamental concepts of the finite 
element method. Consideration of geo- 
metric and material nonlinearities, con- 
vergence, mesh gradation and computa- 
tional procedures in analysis. Applica- 
tions to plane stress and plane strain, 
plates and shells, eigenvalue problems, 
axi-symmetic stress analysis, and other 
problems in civil engineering. 

ENCE 670 Highway Traffic Charac- 
teristics and Measurements. (3) Prereq- 
uisite, ENCE 470 or consent of instruc- 
tor. The study of the fundamental traits 
and behavior patterns of the road user 
and his vehicle in traffic. The basic 
characteristics of the pedestrian, the 
driver, the vehicle, traffic volume and 
speed, stream flow and intersection 
operation, parking, and accidents. 

ENCE 671 Highway Traffic Operations. 

(3) Prerequisite, ENCE 470, ENCE 670 or 
consent of instructor. A survey of traffic 
laws and ordinances. The design, ap- 
plication and operation of traffic control 
devices and aids, including traffic signs 
and signals, pavement markings, and 
hazard delineation. Capacity, accident, 
and parking analyses. 

ENCE 672 Regional Transportation Plan- 
ning. (3) Prerequisite, ENCE 471 or con- 
sent of instructor. Factors involved and 
the components of the process for plan- 
ning statewide and regional transporta- 
tion systems, encompassing all modes. 
Transportation planning studies, state- 
wide traffic models, investment models, 
programming and scheduling. 

ENCE 673 Urban Transportation. (3) Pre- 
requisite, ENCE 672 or consent of in- 
structor. Relationship of transportation 
to the total urban complex, the urban 
transportation planning process, the 
models used to achieve the various steps 
in the process and the relationship of 
private and public transportation. Con- 
sideration of the factors influencing the 
demand for transportation and the socio- 
economic consequences of transporta- 
tion. 

ENCE 674 Urban Transit Planning and 
Rail Transportation Engineering. (3) Pre- 
requisite, ENCE 471 or consent of in- 
structor. Basic engineering components 
of conventional and high speed railroads 
and of air cushion and other high speed 
new technology. The study of urban rail 
and bus transit. The characteristics of 
the vehicle, the supporting way, and the 
terminal requirements will be evaluated 
with respect to system performance, 
capacity, cost, and level of service. 



ENCE 675 Airport Planning and Design. 

(3) Prerequisite, ENCE 471 or consent of 
instructor. The planning and design of 
airports including site selection, runway 
configuration, geometric and structural 
design of the landing area, and terminal 
facilities. l\/lethods of financing airports, 
estimates of aeronautical demand, air 
traffic control, and airport lighting are 
also studied. 

ENCE 676 Highway Traffic Flow Theory. 

(3) Prerequisite, ENCE 461, ENCE 462 or 
consent of the instructor. An examina- 
tion of physical and statistical laws that 
are used to represent traffic flow 
phenomena. Deterministic models in- 
cluding heat flow, fluid flow, and energy- 
momentum analogies, car following 
models, and acceleration noise. Stochas- 
tic approaches using independent and 
Markov processes, queuing models, and 
probability distributions. 

ENCE 677 Quantitative Methods in Trans- 
portation Engineering. (3) Prereq- 
uisite, ENCE 461 or consent of instruc- 
tor. Theory, methods and applications 
relevant to the study of micro- and 
macro-scale transportation systems, in 
terms of their behavior, design, and 
evaluation, A selected overview of op- 
timization, multivariate statistics, 
stochastic processes and the general 
science of systems decision processes 
will form the basis for a selected study of 
pertinent examples. 

ENCE 688 Advanced Topics in Civil En- 
gineering. (1-3) Prerequisite, permission 
of instructor. Advanced topics selected 
by the faculty from the current literature 
of civil engineering to suit the needs and 
background of students. May be taken 
for repeated credit when identified by 
topic title. 

ENCE 689 Seminar. (1-16) 

ENCE 731 Advanced Ground Water 
Hydrology. (3) Prerequisite, ENCE 432 or 
equivalent. Theory and application of 
unsteady flow in porous media Analysis 
of one and two dimensional unsteady 
flow. Solutions of nonlinear equation of 
unsteady flow with a free surface. Devel- 
opment and use of approximate numeri- 
cal and graphical methods in the study 
of ground water movement, 

ENCE 732 Deterministic Models in Sur- 
face Water Hydrology (3) A detained ex- 
amination of the processes controlling 
the quantity and quality of watershed 
runoff: emphasis is on the development 
of deterministic mathematical models for 
process simulation: role of land-phase 
processes in flood hydrology: evapora- 
tion and transpiration: models for urban 
watersheds: linkage for hydrograph syn- 
thesis. 

ENCE 733 Applied Water Chemistry. (4) 

Prerequisite, ENCE 633 or consent of in 
structor. Three lectures, one lab a week. 
A study of the chemistry of both munici- 
pal and industrial water treatment pro- 
cesses. Among the topics to be con- 
sidered are water softening, stabilization, 
chemical destabilization of colloidal 



Graduate Programs / 81 



materials, ion exchange, disinfection, 
chemical oxidation and oxygenation re- 
actions. 

ENCE 734 Aerosol Science and Tech- 
nology. (3) Three lectures per week. Pre- 
requisite, ENCE 430 or equivalent. 
Physical properties of air-borne particles. 
Theories of: particle motion under the ac- 
tion of external forces: coagulation: 
Brownian motion and diffusion. Applica- 
tion of aerosols in atmospheric sciences 
and industrial processes. 
ENCE 735 Design of IVIunicipal and In- 
dustrial Wastes Treatment Facilities. (3) 
Corequisite, ENCE 736 or equivalent. 
One lecture and two laboratory periods a 
week. Application of basic science and 
engineering science to design of munici- 
pal and industrial waste treatment pro- 
cesses: design and economics of unit 
operations as applied to environmental 
systems. 

ENCE 736 Theory of Aqueous and Solid 
Waste Treatment and Disposal. (3) 

Prerequisites, ENCE 221 and fundamen- 
tals of micorobiology, or consent of in- 
structor. Theory and basic principles of 
treating and handling waste products: 
hydraulics of sewers: biological oxida- 
tion: principles and design criteria of 
biological and physical treatment pro- 
cesses: disposal of waste sludges and 
solids. 

ENCE 737 Industrial Wastes. (3) Coreq- 
uisite, ENCE 736 or equivalent. A study 
of the characteristics of liquid wastes 
from major industries, and the processes 
producing the wastes. The theory and 
methods of eliminating or treating the 
wastes, and their effects upon municipal 
sewage-treatment plants, and receiving 
waters. 

ENCE 738 Selected Topics in Porous 
Media Flow. (3) Prerequisite, ENCE 731. 
Analysis of two-liquid flows for immisci- 
ble fluids, simultaneous flow of two im- 
miscible fluids and miscible fluids. 
Hydrodynamic dispersion theories, 
parameters of dispersion and solutions 
of some dispersion problems with em- 
phasis on migration of pollutants. A max- 
imum of six hours may be earned in this 
course. 

ENCE 750 Analysis and Design of Struc- 
tural Systems. (3) Prerequisite: ENCE 450 
and ENCE 451 or equivalent; review of 
classical determinate and indeterminate 
analysis techniques: numerical tech- 
nique: multistory buildings: space struc- 
tures: suspension bridges and cables 
structures: arches: long span bridges. 

ENCE 751 Advanced Problems in Struc- 
tural Behavior. (3) Prerequisite, ENCE 750 
or equivalent. Elastic and inelastic 
behavior of structural members and 
frames: problems in torsion, stability and 
bending: open and closed thin-walled 
sections: curved girders. 

ENCE 753 Reinforced Concrete Struc- 
tures. (3) Prerequisite: ENCE 450 and 451 
or equivalent. The behavior and strength 
of reinforced concrete members under 
combined loadings, including the effects 



of creep, shrinkage and temperature. 
Mechanisms of shear resistance and 
design procedures for bond, shear and 
diagonal tension. Elastic and ultimate 
strength analysis and design of slabs. 
Columns in multistory frames. Applica- 
tions to reinforced concrete structures. 

ENCE 754 Prestressed Concrete Struc- 
tures. (3) Prerequisite, ENCE 450 and 451 
or equivalent. Fundamental concepts of 
prestressed concrete. Analysis and 
design of flexural members including 
composite and continuous beams with 
emphasis on load balancing technique. 
Ultimate strength design for shear. 
Design of post tensioned flat slabs. 
Various applications of prestressing in- 
cluding tension members, compression 
members, circular prestressing, frames 
and folded plates. 

ENCE 799 Master's Thesis Research. 
(1-6). 

ENCE 899 Doctoral Dissertation Re- 
search. (1-8). 

Comparative Literature 
Program 

Professor and Director: Fuegi 

Professors: Barry, Best, Bryer, Freedman, 
Goodwyn, Gramberg, Hering, Hinderer, 
Jones, MacBain, Panichas, Russell, 
Salamanca, Stern, Whittemore. 

Associate Professors: Coogan, Demaitre, 
Fink, Fleck, Greenwood, Holton, Mack, 
Russell. 

The Program in Comparative 
Literature offers graduate work 
leading to the degrees of Master of 
Arts and Doctor of Philosophy. 

The CMLT Program draws on a 
distinguished faculty in several 
departments and offers concen- 
trated work in Medieval and 
Renaissance studies, and in major 
movements and genres of the 
modern period including the Eigh- 
teenth Century. Though the focus of 
courses and seminars is usually 
specifically literary, interdisciplinary 
work is very much encouraged as is 
practical criticism in the arts. 
Departments cooperating in the Pro- 
gram include: American Studies, 
Classics, English, French and 
Italian, German and Slavic, History, 
Spanish and Portuguese, Dramatic 
Arts, Radio-Television-Film, and the 
Women's Studies Programs. 

Admission and Degree Information 

Applicants should have a strong 
background in the arts and 
humanities. Since advanced work in 
Comparative Literature is based on 
the premise that literature should be 
read in the original whenever possi- 
ble, students are expected to be able 



to read at least one language other 
than English with a high degree of 
aesthetic appreciation. Ph.D. 
students are expected to use at 
least two foreign languages actively 
in their work, and it is assumed that 
efforts will be made to develop an 
acquaintance with one or two addi- 
tional languages. Entrance examina- 
tions are not required, but high 
scores on GRE literature and 
language examinations will add 
weight to applications. 

Students take courses in CMLT 
and in two other deparments of 
literature. The M.A. degree requires 
thirty hours, either 24 hours of 
course work and a thesis, or thirty 
hours of course work and a com- 
prehensive examination. No specific 
number of hours is required for the 
Ph.D., as the number will vary 
according to the preparation and 
goals of the individual student; the 
average has been eight to ten 
courses beyond the M.A. A 
Master's degree is a required step 
toward the Ph.D. The Ph.D. com- 
prehensive examinations cover four 
major areas, determined after con- 
sultation with the individual 
student's committee. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

The resources of the Kennedy 
Center, the Folger Library, the 
American Film Institute, Kennan In- 
stitute, and Dumbarton Oaks are 
regularly drawn upon as are intern- 
ship possibilities in the greater 
Washington area and graduate ex- 
change programs with European 
Universities. 

Financial Assistance 

Various assistantships and general 
university fellowships are available. 
CMLT students may teach in various 
departments cooperating in the 
CMLT Program and may be con- 
sidered for a year abroad as a 
teacher at a cooperating European 
university. 

Courses 

CMLT 401 Introductory Sunrey Of Com- 
parative Literature. (3) Survey of the 
background of European literature 
through study of Greek and Latin 
literature in English translations, 
discussing the debt of modern literature 
to the ancients. 

CMLT 402 Introductory Survey of Com- 
parative Literature. (3) Study of the 
medieval and modern continental 
literature. 



82 / Graduate Programs 



CMLT 411 The Greek Drama. (3) The 

chief works of Aeschyus. Sophocles. 
Euripides, and Aristophanes in English 
translation. Emphasis on the historic 
background, on drannatic structure, and 
on the effect of the Attic drama upon the 
mind of the civilized world. 

CMLT 415 The Old Testament As 
Literature. (3) A study of sources, 
development and literary types. 

CMLT 416 New Testament As Literature. 

(3) A study of the books of the New 
Testament, with attention to the relevant 
historical background and to the 
transmission of the text. A knowledge of 
Greek is helpful, but not essential. 

CMLT 421 The Classical Tradition And Its 
influence In The Middle Ages And The 

Renaissance. (3) Emphasis on major 
writers. Reading knowledge of Greek or 
Latin required. 

CMLT 422 The Classical Tradition And Its 
Influence In The Middle Ages And The 
Renaissance. (3) Emphasis on major 
writers. Reading knowledge of Greek or 
Latin required. 

CMLT 430 Literature Of The Middle Ages. 

(3) Narrative, dramatic and lyric literature 
of the Middle Ages studied in translation. 

CMLT 433 Dante And The Romance 
Tradition. (3) A reading of the Divine 
Comedy to enlighten the discovery of 
reality in western literature. 

CMLT 461 Romanticism ■ Early Stages. 

(3) Emphasis on England. France, and 
Germany. Reading knowledge of French 
or German required. 

CMLT 462 Romanticism - Flowering And 
Influence. (3) Emphasis on England, 
France, and Germany. Reading 
knowledge of French or German re- 
quired. 

CMLT 469 The Continental Novel. (3) The 

novel in translation from Stendhal 
through the Existentialists, selected 
from literatures of France, Germany, 
Italy, Russia, and Spain. 

CMLT 470 Ibsen And The Continental 
Drama. (3) Emphasis on the major work 
of Ibsen, with some attention given to 
selected predecessors, contemporaries, 
and successors. 

CMLT 479 Major Contemporary Authors. 
(3). 

CMLT 488 Genres. (3) A study of a 
recognized literary form, such as tragedy, 
epic, satire, literary criticism, comedy, 
tragicomedy, etc. the course may be 
repeated for cumulative credit up to six 
hours when different material is 
presented. 

CMLT 489 Major Writers. (3) Each 
semester two major writers from dif- 
ferent cultures and languages will be 
studied. Authors will be chosen on the 
basis of significant relationships of 
cultural and aesthetic contexts, 
analogies between their respective 
works, and the importance of each writer 
to his literary tradition. 



CMLT 496 Conference Course In Com- 
parative Literature, (3) Second semester. 
A tutorial type discussion course, cor- 
relating the courses in various literatures 
which the student has previously taken 
with the primary themes and master- 
pieces of world literature. This course is 
required of undergraduate majors in 
comparatiave literature, but must not be 
taken until the final year of the student's 
program. 

CMLT 498 Selected Topics In Com- 
parative Literature, (3) 

CMLT 601 Problems In Comparative 
Literature. (3) 

CMLT 610 Folklore In Literature. (3) 

CMLT 631 The Medieval Epic. (3) 

CMLT 632 The Medieval Romance. (3) 

CMLT 639 Studies In The Renaissance. 

(3) Repeatable to a maximum of nine 
hours. 

CMLT 640 The Italian Renaissance And 
Its Influence. (3) 

CMLT 642 Problems Of The Baroque In 
Literature. (3) 

CMLT 649 Studies In Eighteenth Century 
Literature. (3) Studies in eighteenth cen- 
tury literature: as announced. Repeatable 
to a maximum of 9 hours. 

CMLT 658 Studies In Romanticism. (3) 

Studies in romaticism: as announced. 
Repeatable to a maximum of 9 hours. 

CMLT 679 Seminar In Modern And Con- 
temporary Literature. (3) Seminar in 
modern and contemporary literature: as 
announced. Repeatable to a maximum of 
9 hours. 

CMLT 681 Literary Criticism ■ Ancient 
And Medieval. (3) 

CMLT 682 Literary Criticism 
■Renaissance And Modern. (3) 

CMLT 799 Master's Thesis Research. 

(1-6) 

CMLT 801 Seminar In Themes And 

Types. (3) 

CMLT 899 Doctoral Dissertation Re- 

seach. (1-8) 

Computer Science 
Program 

Professor and Chairman: Minker 
Professors: Atchison. Chu', Edmundson', 

Kanal, Stewart' 
Associate Professors: Agrawala, Austing, 

Basili, Vandergraft, Zelkowitz. 
Assistant Professors: Gannon, Gligor, 

Hagerty', Hamlet, Hecht, Kim, Mills, 

D,, Rieger, Samet, Zave, 
ResearcfJ Professors: Rheinboldt',', 

Rosenfeld'. 
Visiting Professor: Mills, H, 
'joint appointment with Computer 
Science Center 

^joint appointment with Electrical 
Engineering 

'joint appointment with Mathematics 
'joint appointment with Institute for 
Fluid Dynamics and Applied 
Mathematics. 



The Departnnent of Computer 
Science offers graduate programs 
leading to the degrees of Master of 
Science and Doctor of Philosophy in 
the following areas: applications, ar- 
tificial intelligence, computer 
systems, information processing, 
numerical analysis, programming 
languages, and theory of computing. 

Admission and Degree Information 

Admission and degree requirements 
specific to the graduate programs in 
computer science are described in a 
brochure available through the 
Departmental Education Office. 
There are two options for the 
master's degree; 24 hours of course 
work plus the completion of a 
thesis; or 33 hours of course work, a 
comprehensive examination plus the 
completion of a scholarly paper. 
There is no minimum course require- 
ment in the doctoral program. The 
number and variety of courses of- 
fered each semester enables 
students and their advisors to plan 
individualized degree programs. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

The Department maintains a 
laboratory consisting of several PDP 
11/45 computer systems, display 
devices peripheral equipment, and 
utilizes the UNIVAC 1108/1100 com- 
puter system maintained by the 
Computer Science Center. 

Additional Information 

For information on degree programs 
and graduate assistantships, con- 
tact: Dr. Richard H. Austing Depart- 
ment of Computer Science. 

Courses 

CMSC 400 Introduction to Computer 
Languages And Systems. (3) Prereq- 
uisite, MATH 241 or equivalent. A ter- 
minal course suitable for non-CMSC ma- 
jors with no programming background. 
Organization and characteristics of com- 
puters. Procedure oriented and assembly 
languages. Representation of data, 
characters and instructions. Introduction 
to logic design and systems organiza- 
tion. Macro definition and generation. 
Program segmentation and linkage. Ex- 
tensive use of the computer to complete 
projects illustrating programming tech- 
niques and machine structure. (CMSC 
400 may not be counted for credit in the 
graduate program in computer science.) 

CMSC 410 Computer Organization. (3) 

Prerequisite: CMSC 210 or equivalent. 
Elements of computer hardware. Parallel 
adders and subtracters. Micro- 
operations. Sequences. Computer 
simulation. Organization of a commer- 
cially available stored program computer. 

Graduate Programs / 83 



Microprogrammed computers. A large- 
scale batch-processing system. No stu- 
dent will be allowed credit for both 
CMSC 410 and ENEE 446. 
CMSC 415 Systems Programming. (3) 
Prerequisite: CMSC 220, 410. Basic 
algorithms of operating system software. 
Memory management using linkage 
editors and loaders. Dynamic relocation 
with base registers, paging. File systems 
and input/output control. Processor 
allocation for multiprogramming, 
timesharing. The emphasis of the course 
is on practical systems programming, in- 
cluding projects such as a simple linkage 
editor, a stand-alone executive, a file 
system, etc. 

CMSC 420 Data Structures. (3) Prereq- 
uisite, CMSC 220 or equivalent. Descrip- 
tion, properties, and storage allocation of 
data structures including lists and trees. 
Algorithms for manipulating structures. 
Applications from areas such as data 
processing, information retrieval, symbol 
manipulation, and operating systems. 

CMSC 426 Image Processing. (3) Prereq- 
uisite; CMSC 420 or equivalent. An in- 
troduction to basic techniques of 
analysis and manipulation of pictorial 
data by computer. Image input/output 
devices, image processing software, 
enhancement, segmentation, property 
measurement, Fourier analysis. Com- 
puter encoding, processing, and analysis 
of curves. 

CMSC 430 Theory of Language Transla- 
tion. (3) Prerequisite; CMSC 120 and 250, 
or equivalent: CMSC 330 recommended. 
Formal translation of programming 
languages, program syntax and seman- 
tics. Finite state grammars and 
recognizers. Context free parsing tech- 
niques such as recursive descent, 
prededence, LL(K), LR(K) and SLR(K). 
Machine independent code improvement 
and generation, syntax directed transla- 
tion schema. Not open to students who 
have credit for CMSC 440. 

CMSC 445 Compiler Writing. (3) Prereq- 
uisites, CMSC 220, 440. A detailed ex- 
amination of a compiler for an algebraic 
language designed around the writing of 
a compiler as the major part of the 
course. Topics covered in the course in- 
clude a review of scanning and parsing, 
the examination of code generation, op- 
timization and error recovery, and 
compiler-writing techniques such as 
bootstrapping and translator writing 
systems. 

CMSC 450 Elementary Logic and 
Algorithms. (3) Prerequisite, MATH 240 or 
consent of instructor. This is the same 
course as MATH 444. An elementary 
development of prepositional logic, 
predicate logic, set algebra, and Boolean 
algebra, with a discussion of Markov 
algorithms, turing machines and recur- 
sive functions. Topics include post pro- 
ductions, word problems, and formal 
languages. 

CMSC 452 Elementary Theory of Com- 
putation. (3) Prerequisites, CMSC 120, 
250. This course is intended to serve two 



purposes: (1) and introduction to the 
theory of computation, and (2) a tie be- 
tween many abstract results and their 
concrete counterparts. This course 
establishes a theoretical foundation for 
the proper understanding of the inherent 
limitations and actual power of digital 
computers. Also, it provides a relatively 
uniform way of stating and investigating 
problems that arise in connection with 
the computation of particular functions 
and certain classes of functions. Topics 
covered include an introductory treat- 
ment of classes of computable func- 
tions, computability by register 
machines, computability by turing 
machines, unsolvable decision problems. 
Concrete computational complexity, and 
complexity of loop programs. 

CMSC 455 Elementary Formal Language 
Theory. (3) Prerequisites CMSC 120, 250. 
This course is intended to serve as an in- 
troduction to the theory of formal 
languages. This theory is encountered in 
the study of both programming 
languages and natural languages, and 
consequently will be useful in numerous 
other courses in computer science at the 
undergraduate and graduate levels. 
Topics covered include the highlights of 
Chomsky's hierarchy of grammars and 
Chomsky's hierarchy of languages, a 
summary treatment of acceptors related 
to these languages, and a brief introduc- 
tion to the theory of transformational 
grammars. 

CMSC 460 Computational Methods. (3) 

Prerequisites: MATH 240, 241, and CMSC 
110, or equivalent. Basic computational 
methods for interpolation, least squares, 
approximation, numerical quadrature, 
numerical solution of polynomial and 
transcendental equations, systems of 
linear equations and initial value prob- 
lems for ordinary differential equations. 
Emphasis on the methods and their com- 
putational properties rather than on their 
analytic aspects, (listed also as MAPL 
460.) 

CMSC 470 Numerical Mathematics: 
Analysis. (3) Prerequisites: MATH 240 
and 241: CMSC 110 or equivalent. This 
course with MAPL/CMSC 471, forms a 
one-year introduction to numerical 
analysis at the advanced undergraduate 
level. Interpolation, numerical differentia- 
tion and integration, solution of 
nonlinear equations, acceleration of con- 
vergence, numerical treatment of dif- 
ferential equations. Topics will be sup- 
plemented with programming assign- 
ments, (listed also as MAPL 470.) 

CMSC 471 Numerical Mathematics: 
Linear Algebra (3) Prerequisites: MATH 
240 and 241 : CMSC 1 10 or equivalent. 
The course, with MAPUCMSC 470, forms 
a one-year introduction to numerical 
analysis at the advanced undergraduate 
level. Direct solution of linear systems, 
norms, least squares problems, the sym- 
metric eigenvalue problem, basic 
iterative methods. Topics will be sup- 
plemented with programming assign- 
ments, (listed also as MAPL 471.) 



CMSC 475 Combinatorics and Graph 
Theory. (3) Prerequisite: MATH 240 and 
MATH 241. General enumeration 
methods, difference equations, 
generating functions. Elements of graph 
theory, matrix representations of graphs, 
applications of graph theory to transport 
networks, matching theory and graphical 
algorithms, (also listed as MATH 475.) 

CMSC 477 Optimization. (3) Prereq- 
uisites: CMSC 1 10 and MATH 405 or 
MATH 474. Linear programming in- 
cluding the simplex algorithm and dual 
linear programs, convex sets and 
elements of convex programming, com- 
binatorial optimization integer program- 
ming, (listed also as MAPL 477.) 

CMSC 480 Simulation of Continuous 
Systems. (3) Prerequisite, CMSC 280 or 
equivalent. Introduction to digital simula- 
tion: simulation by mimic programming; 
simulation by FORTRAN programming: 
simulation by DSL/90 (or CSMP) program- 
ming: logic and construction of a simula- 
tion processor; similarity between digital 
simulations of continuous and discrete 
systems. 

CMSC 498 Special Problems in Computer 
Science. (1-3) Prerequisite, permission of 
instructor. An individualized course 
designed to allow a student or students 
to pursue a specialized topic or project 
under the supervision of the senior staff. 
Credit according to work done. 

CMSC 600 Programming Systems. (3) 

Prerequisites, CMSC 410, 420 and 440. 
Review of batch-process programming 
systems, their components, operating 
characteristics, services and limitations. 
Concurrent processing of input-output 
and interrupt handling. Structure of 
multiprogramming systems for large- 
scale multiprocessor computers. Ad- 
dressing techniques, storage allocation, 
file management, systems accounting, 
and user-related services; command 
languages and the embedding of sub- 
systems. Operating characteristics of 
large-scale systems. 

CMSC 610 Computer Systems. (3) Prereq- 
uisite. CMSC 410 or equivalent. Com- 
puter organization. Memory logic. Con- 
trol logic. Numerical processors. Non- 
numerical processors. Computer ar- 
chitecture. On-line computer systems. 
Time-sharing computer systems. Com- 
puter networks. Analog an hybrid com- 
puter systems. 

CMSC 620 Problem Solving Methods in 
Artificial Intelligence. (3) Prerequisites, 
CMSC 420 and 450. Underlying 
theoretical concepts in solving problems 
by heuristically guided trial and error 
search methods. State-space problem 
reduction, and first-order predicate 
calculus representations for solving 
problems. Search algorithms and their 
"optimality' proofs. 

CMSC 630 Theory of Programming 
Languages. (3) Prerequisite: CMSC 440. 
Syntactic and semantic models of pro- 
gramming languages. Finite state pro- 
cessors and their application to lexical 
analysis. Context free languages, LR(K), 



84 / Graduate Programs 



precedence languages as models of pro- 
gramming languages. Extensions to con- 
text free grammars such as property 
grammars, infierited and synthesized at- 
tributes, Van Wijngaarden grammars 
(ALGOL 68), abstract syntax, the Vienna 
definition language, graph models. 
Translator writing systems. 

CMSC 640 Computability and Automata. 

(3) Prerequisite, CMSC 450 or equivalent. 
Introduction to formal treatment of 
abstract computing devices and the con- 
cept of 'effective procedure'. Major 
topics: (1) finite-state automata, finite- 
state transducers and acceptors, finite- 
state languages, regular expressions and 
sets. (2) turing machines, computability, 
and partial recursive functions. The tur- 
ing formalism as a model of the com- 
putation process; (3) representative 
models of digital computers. 

CMSC 660 Algorithmic Numerical 
Analysis (3) Prerequisites, MATH/CMSC 
460 or 470, and CMSC 1 10. Detailed 
study of problems arising in the im- 
plementation of numerical algorithms on 
a computer. Typical problems include 
rounding errors, their estimation and 
control: numerical stability considera- 
tions: stopping criteria for converging 
processes: parallel methods. Examples 
from linear algebra, differential equa- 
tions, minimization. (Also listed as MATH 
684). 

CMSC 670 Numerical Analysis. (3) Pre 

requisite, MATH/CMSC 460 or 470, MATH 
405, and MATH 410. Perturbation 
theorems for linear equations and eigen- 
value problems. Stability of solutions of 
ordinary differential equations. Disretiza- 
tion errors for ordinary differential equa- 
tions. Rounding error for linear equa- 
tions. Convergence theorems for iterative 
methods for linear and nonlinear equa- 
tions. (Listed also as MATH 638). 

CMSC 700 Translation of Programming 
Languages. (3) Prerequisites, CMSC 420 
and 440. Application of theoretical con- 
cepts developed in formal language and 
automata theory to the analytic design of 
programming languages and their pro- 
cessors. Theory of push-down automata, 
precedence analysis, and bounded- 
context syntactic analysis as models of 
syntactic portion of translator design. 
Design criteria underlying compiler 
techniques, such as backtracking and 
lookahead. Methods for analyzing 
translator operation in terms of 
estimating storage space and translation 
time requirements. Current version of 
Backus-Naur form. Associated semanic 
notations for specifying the operation of 
programming language translators. 

CMSC 710 Simulation of Computers and 
Software. (3) Prerequisite, CMSC 410 or 
equivalent. Computer simulation 
language, macro and micro simulation. 
Boolean translation, software-hardware 
transformaion, description and simula- 
tion of a microprogrammed computer, 
construction and simulation of an 
assembler, project for unified hardware- 
software design. 



CMSC 720 Information Retrieval. (3) 

Prerequisite, CMSC 420. Designed to in- 
troduce the student to computer tech- 
niques for information organization and 
retrieval of natural language data. Tech- 
niques of statistical, syntactic and 
logical analysis of natural language for 
retrieval, and the extent of their success. 
Methods of designing systems for use in 
operational environments. Applications 
to both data and document systems. 

CMSC 723 Computational Linguistics. (3) 

Prerequisite, CMSC 420. Introductory 
course on applications of computational 
techniques to linguistics and natural- 
language processing. Research cycle of 
corpus selection, pre-editing, key- 
punching, processing, post-editing, and 
evaluation. General-purpose input, pro- 
cessing, and output routines. Special- 
purpose programs for sentence parsing 
and generation, segmentation, idiom 
recognition, paraphrasing, and stylistic 
and discourse analysis. Programs for dic- 
tionary, thesaurus, and concordance 
compilation, and editing. Systems for 
automatic abstracting, translation, and 
question-answering. 

CMSC 725 Mathematical Linguistics. (3) 

Prerequisites, CMSC 640 and STAT 400. 
Int.oductory course on applications of 
mathematics to linguistics. Elementary 
ideas in phonology, grammar, and 
semantics. Automata, formal grammars 
and languages. Chomsky's theory of 
transformational grammars, Yngve's dep- 
thhypothesis and syntactic complexity. 
Markov-chain models of word and 
sentence generation. Shannon's informa- 
tion theory, Carnap and Bar-Hillel's 
semantic theory, lexicostatistics and 
stylostatistics, Zopf's law of frequency 
and Mandelbrot's rank hypothesis. 
Mathematical models as theoretical 
foundation for computational linguistics. 

CMSC 730 Artificial Intelligence. (3) 

Prerequisites, CMSC 620 and STAT 401. 
Heuristic programming: tree search pro- 
cedures. Programs for game playing, 
theorem finding and proving, problem 
solving: multiple-purpose programs. Con- 
versation with computers; question- 
answering programs. Trainable pattern 
classifiers-linear, piecewise linear, 
quadratic, '0', and multilayer machines. 
Statistical decision theory, decision 
functions, likelihood ratios; 
mathematical taxonomy, cluster detec- 
tion. Neural models, computational pro- 
perties of neural nets, processing of sen- 
sory information, representative concep- 
tual models of the brain. 

CMSC 733 Computer Processing of Pic- 
torial Information. (3) Prerequisite, CMSC 
420. Input, output, and storage of pic- 
torial information. Pictures as informa- 
tion sources, efficient encoding, sampl- 
ing, quantization, approximation. 
Position-invariant operations on pictures, 
digital and optical implementations, the 
PAX language, applications to matched 
and spatial frequency filtering. Picture 
quality, 'image enhancement' and 
'image restoration'. Picture properties 
and pictorial pattern recognition. Pro- 



cessing of complex pictures: 'figure' ex- 
traction, properties of figures. Data struc- 
tures for pictures description and 
manipulation; 'picture languages'. 
Graphics systems for alphanumeric and 
other symbols, line drawings of two- and 
three-dimensional objects, cartoons and 
movies. 

CMSC 737 Topics in Information 
Science. (3) Prerequisite, permission of 
the instructor. This is the same course as 
LBSC 721. Definition of information 
science, relation to cybernetics and 
other sciences, system analysis, informa- 
tion, basic constraints on information 
systems, processes of communication, 
classes and their use, optimalization and 
mechanization. 

CMSC 740 Automata Theory. (3) Prere- 
quisite, CMSC 640. This is the same 
course as ENEE 652. Introduction to the 
theory of abstract mathematical 
machines. Structural and behavioral 
classification of automata. Finite-state 
automata; theory of regular sets. 
Pushdown automata. Linear-bounded 
automata. Finite transducers. Turing 
machines; universal turing machines. 
CMSC 745 Theory of Formal Languages. 
(3) Prerequisite, CMSC 640. Formal gram- 
mars; syntax and semantics. Post pro- 
ductions; Markov algorithms. Finite-state 
languages, parsing, trees, and ambiguity. 
Theory of regular sets. Context-free 
languages; pushdown automata. 
Context-sensitive languages; linear- 
bounded automata. Unrestricted 
rewriting systems; turing machines. 
Closure properties of languages under 
operations. Undecidability theorems. 

CMSC 750 Theory of Computability. (3) 

Prerequisite, CMSC 640. Algorithms; 
Church's thesis. Primitive recursive func- 
tions; Godel numbering. General and par- 
tial recursive functions. Turing machines; 
Turings' thesis. Markov algorithms. 
Church's lamda calculus. Grzegorczyk 
hierarch; Peter hierarchy. Relative recur- 
siveness. Word problems. Post's cor- 
respondence problem. 

CMSC 755 Theories of Information. (3) 

Prerequisites, CMSC 620 and STAT 401. 
Mathematical and logical foundations of 
existing theories of information. Topics 
include Fisher's theory of statistical in- 
formation, Kullback and Leibler's theory 
of statistical information, Shannon's 
theory of selective information, and 
Carnap and Bar-Hillel's theory of seman- 
tic information. The similarities and dif- 
ferences of these and other theories are 
treated. 

CMSC 770 Advanced Linear Numerical 
Analysis. (3) Prerequisite; MAPL 470, 471 
and MATH 405 or MATH 474; or consent 
of instructor. Advanced topics in 
numerical linear algebra, such as dense 
eigenvalue problems, sparse elimination, 
iterative methods, and other topics. 
(Same as MAPL 600.) 

CMSC 772 Numerical Solution of 
Nonlinear Equations. (3) Prerequisite; 
MAPL 470, 471 and MATH 410; or con- 
sent of instructor. Numerical solution of 

Graduate Programs / 85 



nonlinear equations in one and several 
variables. Existence questions. Minimiza- 
tion methods. Selected applications. 
(Same as MAPL 604.) 

CMSC 780 Computer Applications to the 
Physical Sciences. (3) Prerequisite, 
CMSC 21. STAT 400, and a graduate 
course in physical science. Applications 
of computers to numerical calculation, 
data reduction, and modeling in the 
physical sciences. Stress will be laid on 
the features of the applications which 
have required techniques not usually 
considered in more general contexts. 

CMSC 782 Modeling and Simulation of 
Physical Systems. (3) Prerequisites, 
CMSC 210 and STAT 401. Monte-Carlo 
and other methods of investigating 
models of interest to physical scientists. 
Generation and testing of random 
numbers. Probabilistic, deterministic and 
incomplete models. 

CMSC 798 Graduate Seminar in Com- 
puter Science. (1-3) 

CMSC 799 Master's Thesis Research 
(1-6). 

CMSC 818 Advanced Topics in Computer 
Systems. (1-3) Prerequisite: permission of 
instructor. Advanced topics selected by 
the faculty from the literature of com- 
puter systems to suit the interest and 
background of students. May be 
repeated for credit. 

CMSC 828 Advanced Topics in Informa- 
tion Processing. (1-3) Prerequisite: per- 
mission of instructor. Advanced topics 
selected by the faculty from the literature 
of information processing to suit the in- 
terest and background of students. May 
be repeated for credit. 

CMSC 838 Advanced Topics in Program- 
ming Languages. (1-3) Prerequisite: per- 
mission of instructor. Advanced topics 
selected by faculty from the literature of 
programming languages to suit the in- 
terest and background of students. May 
be reapeated for credit. 

CMSC 840 Advanced Automata Theory. 

(3) Prerequisite CMSC 740. Advances and 
innovations in automata theory. Variants 
of elementary automata; multitape, 
multihead, and multidimensional 
machines. Counters and stack automata. 
Wang machines; Shepherdson-Sturgis 
machines. Recursive hierarchies. Effec- 
tive computability; relative uncom- 
putability. Probabilistic automata. 

CMSC 858 Advanced Topics in Theory of 
Computing. (1-3) Prerequisite: permission 
of instructor. Advanced topics selected 
by the faculty from the literature of 
theory of computing to suit the interest 
and background of students. May be 
repeated for credit. 

CMSC 878 Advanced Topics in 
Numerical Methods. (1-3) Prerequisite: 
permission of instructor. Advanced 
topics selected by the faculty from the 
literature of numerical methods to suit 
the interest and background of students. 
May be repeated for credit. 

86 / Graduate Programs 



CMSC 898 Advanced Topics in Applica- 
tions. (1-3) Prerequisite: permission of in- 
structor. Advanced topics selected by 
the faculty from the literature of applica- 
tions of computer science to suit the in- 
terest and background of students. May 
be repeated for credit. 

CMSC 899 Doctoral Dissertation Re- 
search. (1-8). 



Counseling and Personnel 
Services Program 

Professor and Chairman: Marx 
Professors: Byrne, Hoyt, Magoon^^ 

Pumroy', Schlossberg 
Associate Professors: Allan, Birk', 

Greenberg, Lawrence, Medvene^ Ray, 

Rhoads, Stern 
Assistant Professors: Boyd, Chasnoff, 

Freeman, Hardwick, Kahn, 

Knefelkamp, Leonard, Levine, 

McMullan, Thomas, Vandergoot, 

Westbrook 
'joint appointment with Psychology 
^joint appointment with Counseling 
Center. 

Historically, the programs of the 
Department of Counseling and Per- 
sonnel Services have been respon- 
sive to societal needs in providing 
leadership in the training of 
specialized personnel service 
v(/orkers. The programs are designed 
for the preparation of professionals 
w/ho serve in a variety of social set- 
tings including schools, colleges, 
rehabilitative agencies, government 
agencies and other community agen- 
cies. These professionals may serve 
one of several roles either at the 
practitioner's level or at an advanced 
level of leadership, supervision and 
research. Programs of preparation 
for practitioners are offered at the 
master's and Advanced Gradudate 
Specialist level while the advanced 
offerings for researchers, super- 
visors, and personnel administrators 
are conducted at the doctoral level. 
The master's and advanced 
Graduate Specialist programs are of- 
fered among the following six 
specialty programs within the 
Department. 

1) The Elementary School 
Counseling Specialty Program 
prepares the student as a child 
development consultant, individual 
and group counselor and coor- 
dinator of pupil services. 2) The 
Secondary School Counseling Pro- 
gram prepares the student to serve 
as a member of a human resources 
team in individual and group 
counseling, as information specialist 



regarding personal, social, educa- 
tional and vocational matters, and 
pupil personnel program coordina- 
tion. 3) The School Psychology Pro- 
gram prepares the student to be cer- 
tified as a school psychologist 
where his principal functions are to 
assess psychological conditions and 
devise intervention strategies to 
enhance the learning of pupils. 4) 
The College Student Personnel 
Specialty Program prepares 
specialists at the higher education 
level in two areas of concentration: 
college counseling and Student Per- 
sonnel Administration which in- 
cludes areas such as Student 
Development, Student Union, Hous- 
ing, Admissions, Placement, Deans 
of Students and Vice Presidents of 
Student Affairs. 5) The Community 
Counseling Specialty Program pro- 
vides three emphases within the pro- 
gram: Career development and voca- 
tional counseling, personal-social 
counseling and community mental 
health consultation, and adult 
counseling. 6) The Rehabilitation 
Counseling Specialty Program 
prepares counselors to work with 
mentally, emotionally, socially and 
physically handicapped persons in 
public and private agencies. 

The doctoral programs in Counsel- 
ing and Personnel Services are 
designed to prepare students to 
achieve exceptional competence in 
the areas of research, theory, and 
practice related to personnel ser- 
vices. Graduates typically assume 
positions of leadership, research or 
supervision of personnel services in 
public units such as large school 
systems, universities, or state 
rehabilitation and community agen- 
cies; as professors in personnel ser- 
vice programs; as counselors in 
higher education institutions. The 
program leading to the Doctor of 
Philosophy degree, has as its major 
emphasis theory and research in the 
behavioral sciences and applied 
fields. The primary thrust at the 
master's and Advanced Graduate 
Specialist levels is upon excellence 
in practice. 

Admission and Degree Information 

Admission to these programs is not 
only based on meeting minimum re- 
quirements, but is also competitively 
based on staff resources available. 
The requirements for the master's 



and Advanced Graduate Specialist's 
diplomas are spelled out for each of 
the six specialty areas. Write or call 
for the specialty area brochure(s) 
which interest you. (301) 454-2026. 

The doctoral program of studies is 
developed with an advisor. The 
single required course is Advanced 
Statistics. There are no language re- 
quirements for the Ph.D. degree. 

Courses 

EDCP 410 Introduction to Counseling 
and Personnel Services. (3) Presents prin- 
ciples and procedures, and examines the 
function of counselors, psychologists in 
schools, school social workers, and 
other personnel service workers. 

EDCP 411 Mental Hygiene. (3) The prac- 
tical application of the principles of men- 
tal hygiene to classroom problems. 

EDCP 413 Behavior Modification. (3) 

Knowledge and techniques of interven- 
tion in a variety of social situations, in- 
cluding contingency contracting and 
time out will be acquired. 

EDCP 414 Principles of Behavior. (3) 

Development of student proficiency in 
analyzing complex patterns of behavior 
on the basis of empirical evidence. 

EDCP 415 Behavior Mediation. (3) Prereq- 
uisite, EDCP 414. Basic principles of 
human behavior will be reviewed and ap- 
plication of these principles will be im- 
plemented under supervision. 

EDCP 417 Group Dynamics and Leader- 
ship. (3) The nature and property of 
groups, interaction analysis, 
developmental phases, leadership 
dynamics and styles, roles of members 
and interpersonal communications. Two 
hours of lecture-discussion and two 
hours of laboratory per week; laboratory 
involves experimental based learning, 

EDCP 420 Education and Racism. (3) 

Strategy development for counselors and 
educators to deal with problems of 
racism. 

EDCP 460 Introduction to Rehabilitation 
Counseling. (3) Introductory course for 
majors in rehabilitation counseling, 
social work, psychology, or education 
who desire to work professionally with 
physically or emotionally handicapped 
persons. 

EDCP 470 Introduction to Student Per- 
sonnel. (3) Prerequisite, consent of in- 
structor. A systematic analysis of 
research and theoretical literature on a 
variety of major problems in the organiza- 
tion and administration of student per- 
sonnel services in higher education. In- 
cluded will be discussion of such topics 
as the student personnel philosophy in 
education, counseling services, 
discipline, housing, student activities, 
financial aid, health, remedial services, 
etc. 

EDCP 489 Field Experience in Counsel- 
ing and Personnel Services. (1-4) Prereq- 



uisites, at least six semester hours in 
education at the University of Maryland 
plus such other prerequisites as may be 
set by the major area in which the ex- 
perience is to be taken. Planned field ex- 
perience may be provided for selected 
students who have had teaching ex- 
perience and whose application for such 
field experience has been approved by 
the education faculty. Field experience is 
offered in a given area to both major and 
nonmajor students. NOTE: the total 
number of credits which a student may 
earn in EDCP 489, 888, and 889 is limited 
to a maximum of 20 semester hours. 

EDCP 498 Special Problems In Counsel- 
ing and Personnel Services. (1-3) Prereq- 
uisite, consent of instructor. Available 
only to major students who have formal 
plans for individual study of approved 
problems. 

EDCP 499 Workshops, Clinics, Institutes. 
(1-6) The maximum number of credits 
that may be earned under this course 
symbol toward any degree is six 
semester hours; the symbol may be used 
two or more times until six semester 
hours have been reached. The following 
type of educational enterprise may be 
scheduled under this course heading: 
workshops conducted by the department 
of counseling and personnel services (or 
developed cooperatively with other 
departments, colleges and universities) 
and not otherwise covered in the present 
course listing; clinical experiences in 
counseling and testing centers, reading 
clinics, speech therapy laboratories, and 
special education centers; institutes 
developed around specific topics or 
problems and intended for designated 
groups. 

EDCP 611 Occupational Choice Theory 
and Information. (3) Research and theory 
related to occupational and educational 
decisions; programs of related informa- 
tion and other activities in occupational 
decision. 

EDCP 614 Personality Theories in 
Counseling and Personnel Services. (3) 

Examination of constructs and research 
relating to major personality theories 
with emphasis on their significance for 
working with the behaviors of in- 
dividuals. 

EDCP 615 Cases In Appraisal. (3) Prereq- 
uisite, EDMS 446 or EDMS 451. Collect- 
ing and interpreting non-standardized 
pupil appraisal data; systhesis of all 
types of data through case study pro- 
cedures. 

EDCP 616 Counseling - Theoretical Foun- 
dations and Practice. (3) Prerequisite, 
EDCP 615. Exploration of learning 
theories as applied to counseling in 
school, and practices which stem from 
such theories. 

EDCP 617 Group Counseling. (3) Prereq- 
uisite, EDCP 616. A survey of theory, 
research and practice of group counsel- 
ing and psychotherapy with an introduc- 
tion to growth groups and the laboratory 
approach, therapeutic factors in groups, 



composition of therapeutic groups, prob- 
lem clients, therapeutic techniques, 
research methods, theories, ethics and 
training of group counselors and 
therapists. 

EDCP 619 Practlcum In Counseling. (2-6) 

Prerequisites, EDCP 616 and permission 
of instructor. Sequence of supervised 
counseling experiences of increasing 
complexity. Limited to eight applicants in 
advance. Two hours class plus labora- 
tory. 

EDCP 626 Group Counseling Practlcum. 

(3) Prerequisite, EDCP 617, EDCP 619, 
and consent of instructor. A supervised 
field experience in group counseling. 

EDCP 627 Process Consultation. (3) Pre- 
requisite, graduate course in group pro- 
cess. Study of case consultation, 
systems consultation, mental health con- 
sultation and the professional's role in 
systems intervention strategies. 

EDCP 633 Diagnostic Appraisal of 
Children I. (4) Assessment of develop- 
ment, emotional and learning problems 
of children in schools. Practlcum ex- 
perience. 

EDCP 634 Diagnostic Appraisal of 
Children II. (4) Prerequisite, EDCP 633. 
.Assessment of development, emotional, 
and learning problems of adolescents in 
schools. Practlcum experience. 

EDCP 635 Therapeutic Techniques and 
Classroom Management I. (3) Prereq- 
uisite, EDCP 414. Diagnosis and treat- 
ment of problems presented by teachers 
and parents. Practlcum experience. 

EDCP 636 Therapeutic Techniques and 
Classroom Management II. (3) Prereq- 
uisite, EDCP 635. The objective of this 
course is to understand and to treat 
children's problems. The focus is primari- 
ly on the older child in secondary school 
and the orientation is essentially 
behavioral. Practlcum experience will be 
provided. 

EDCP 645 Counseling In Elementary 
Schools. (3) Prerequisite, EDCP 615 or 
consent of instructor. Counseling theory 
and practices as related to children. Em- 
phasis will be placed on an awareness of 
the child's total behavior as well as on 
specific methods of communicating with 
the child through techniques of play in- 
terviews, observations, and the use of 
non-parametric data. 

EDCP 655 Organization and Administra- 
tion of Personnel Services. (2) Prereq- 
uisite, EDCP 619 or permission of in- 
structor. Exploration of personnel ser- 
vices programs and implementing per- 
sonnel services practices. 

EDCP 656 Counseling and Personnel Ser- 
vices Seminar. (2) Prerequisite, advanced 
standing. Examination of issues that 
bear on professional issues such as 
ethics, interprofessional relationships 
and research. 

EDCP 661 Psycho-Social Aspects of 
Disability. (3) Prerequisite, EDCP 460 or 
consent of instructor. This course is part 
of the core curriculum for rehabilitation 



Graduate Programs / 87 



counselors. It is designed to develop an 
understanding of the nature and impor- 
tance of ttie personal and psycho-social 
aspects of adult disability. 

EDCP 662 Psychiatric Aspects of 
Disability I. (3) Prerequisite, EDCP 460 or 
equivalent and consent of instructor. 
Part of core curriculum in rehabilitation 
counseling. It is designed to develop an 
understanding of the rehabilitation pro- 
cess, clients served, and skills and at- 
titudes necessary for working effectively 
with the physically disabled. 

EDCP 663 Psychiatric Aspects of 
Disability II. (3) Prerequisite, EDCP 460 or 
equivalent and consent of instructor. 
Part of core curriculum in rehabilitation 
counseling. The psychiatric rehabilitation 
client; understanding his needs, treat- 
ment approaches available, and society's 
reaction to the client. 

EDCP 668 Special Topics in Rehabilita- 
tion. (1-6) Prerequisite, permission of the 
instructor Repeatable to a maximum of 
six hours. 

EDCP 718 Advanced Seminar in Group 
Processes. (2-6) Prerequisites, EDCP 626. 
Repeatable to a maximum of six credits. 

EDCP 735 Seminar in Rehabilitation 
Counseling. (2) This course is part of the 
core curriculum for rehabilitation 
counselors. It is designed to provide the 
advanced rehabilitation counseling stu- 
dent with a formal seminar to discuss, 
evaluate and attempt to reach personal 
resolution regarding pertinent profes- 
sional problems and issues in the field. 

EDCP 771 The College Student. (3) A 

demographic study of the characteristics 
of college students as well as a study of 
their aspirations, values, and purposes. 

EDCP 776 Modification of Human 
Behavior - Laboratory and Practicum. (3) 

Prerequisite, permission of instructor. In- 
dividual and group supervised introduc- 
tion to intake and counseling relation- 
ships. 

EDCP 777 Modification of Human 
Behavior • Laboratory and Practicum. (3) 

Prerequisite, EDCP 776 and permission 
of instructor. Continuation of EDCP 776. 
Further experience under direct supervi- 
sion of more varied forms of counseling 
relationships. 

EDCP 778 Seminar in Student Personnel. 
(2-6) An intensive study of the various 
student personnel functions. A means to 
integrate the knowledge from various 
fields as they relate to student personnel 
administration. 

EDCP 788 Advanced Practicum in 
Counseling. (1-6) Prerequisite, permis 
sion of instructor, previous practicum ex- 
perience. Individual supervision of 
counseling, and group consultation. 
Repeatable to maximum of six credits. 

EDCP 789 Advanced Topics in Counsel- 
ing and Personnel Services. (1-6) 

Repeatable to a maximum of 6 Credits. 

EDCP 798 Special Problems in Counsel- 
ing and Personnel Services. (1-6) 

Master's AGS. or doctoral candidates 

88 / Graduate Programs 



who desire to pursue special research 
problems under the direction of their ad- 
visers may register for credit under this 
number. 

EDCP 799 Master's Thesis Research. (1-6) 

Registration required to the extent of six 
hours for master's thesis. 

EDCP 888 Apprenticeship in Counseling 
and Personnel Services. (1-9) Appren- 
ticeships in the major area of study are 
available to selected students whose ap- 
plication for an apprenticeship has been 
approved by the education faculty. Each 
apprentice is assigned to work for at 
least a semester full-time or the 
equivalent with an appropriate staff 
member of a cooperating school, school 
system, or educational institution or 
agency. The sponsor of the apprentice 
maintains a close working relationship 
with the apprentice and the other per- 
sons involved. Prerequisites, teaching ex- 
perience, a master's degree in education, 
and at least six semester hours in educa- 
tion at the University of Maryland. NOTE: 
the total number of credits which a stu- 
dent may earn in EDCP 489, 888, and 889 
is limited to a maximum of twenty (20) 
semester hours. 

EDCP 889 Internship in Counseling and 
Personnel Services. (3-16) Internships in 
the major area of study are available to 
selected students who have teaching ex- 
perience. The following groups of 
students are eligible: (A) any student who 
has been advanced to candidacy for the 
doctor's degree; and (B) any student who 
receives special approval by the educa- 
tion faculty for an internship, provided 
that prior to taking an internship, such 
student shall have completed at least 60 
semester hours of graduate work, in- 
cluding at least six semester hours in 
education at the University of Maryland. 
Each intern is assigned to work on a full- 
time basis for at least a semester with an 
appropriate staff member in a 
cooperating school, school system, or 
educational institution or agency. The in- 
ternship must be taken in a school situa- 
tion different from the one where the stu- 
dent is regularly employed. The intern's 
sponsor maintains a close working rela- 
tionship with the intern and the other 
persons involved. NOTE: the total 
number of credits which a student may 
earn in EDCP 489, 888, and 889 is limited 
to a maximum of twenty (20) semester 
hours. 

EDCP 899 Doctoral Dissertation Re- 
search. (1-8) Registration required to the 
extent of 6-9 hours for an Ed.D project 
and 12-18 hours for a Ph.D. dissertation. 



Criminal Justice and Crim- 
inology Program 

(Institute of Criminal Justice and Crim- 
inology) 

Professor and Director: Lejins 
Associate Professors: Ingraham, Maida, 

Tennyson 
Assistant Professors: Butler, Debro, 

B. Johnson, K. Johnson, Minor 



The Program of graduate study leading 
to a Master of Arts and Ph.D. degree 
in the area of Criminal Justice and Crim- 
inology is intended to prepare students 
for research, teaching and professional 
employment in the operational agencies 
in the field of criminal justice. This pro- 
gram combines an intensive back- 
ground in a social science discipline 
such as sociology, psychology, public 
administration, etc., with graduate-level 
study of selected aspects of the criminal 
justice field. 

Admission and Degree Information 

In addition to the general Graduate 
School requirements, special admis- 
sion requirements include the Graduate 
Record Examination Aptitude Test, a 
major in a social science discipline, and 
9 hours of course work in the appro- 
priate area of criminal justice. For the 
M.A. applicant, the undergraduate social 
science major must have included at 
least one course each in theory, statis- 
tics and research methods. The Ph.D. 
applicant must have completed two sta- 
tistics and research methods courses, 
one of each being at the master's-level. 
Admission to the Ph.D program pre- 
supposes completion of the M.A. de- 
gree. At the discretion of the Graduate 
Admissions Committee of the Institute, 
deficiencies in some of the above areas 
may be made up by noncredit work at 
the beginning of the program. 

Students enrolled in the M.A. pro- 
gram have two options: a Criminology 
option and a Criminal Justice option. 
The general plan of study for both op- 
tions, totaling to 30 semester hours, is 
as follows: 1) Three social science 
courses on an appropriate level in the- 
ory, methodology, and statistics. 2) 
Three appropriate-level courses in Crim- 
inology or Law Enforcement, depending 
upon the option. Two of these must be 
at the 600 level or above. One of these 
should be a general seminar dealing 
with the overall field of criminal justice 
(LENF 600). 3) Two elective courses. 
4) Tutorial courses may be taken only 
as elective courses. 5) The student has 
a choice between: a) an M.A. degree 
with an M.A. thesis, b) an M.A. degree 
without thesis, but with some additional 
requirements. 

For completion of the Ph.D. degree, 
in addition to the general Graduate 
School Ph.D. requirements, compe- 
tence in the theory of at least one social 
science discipline, in research metho- 
dology and in quantitative techniques is 
expected, as well as competence in the 



general theory of the criminal justice 
field and in the specialization area se- 
lected by the student. The necessary 
coursework is determined on the basis 
of the student's previous preparation, 
needs, and interests. The candidate is 
required to pass 4 comprehensive ex- 
aminations. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

The Institute presently has two substan- 
tial grants with the Law Enforcement 
Assistance Administration. U.S. Depart- 
ment of Justice. Of these, the Inter- 
national Seminars and Training Pro- 
grams in Criminal Justice" project grant 
may be of interest to incoming graduate 
students who are interested in trans- 
national comparative studies. Several 
international contacts have been de- 
veloped through this project. 

Financial Assistance 

Several graduate teaching assistant- 
ships are available on a competitive 
basis. Further, graduate research assis- 
tantships are sometimes available for 
graduate students to participate in re- 
search projects directed by faculty 
members and funded by outside 
sources. 

Additional Information 

A brochure describing the Intitule of 
Criminal Justice and Criminology and its 
programs is available upon request. 
Inquiries should be directed to: Dr. Peter 
P. Lejins. Director. 

Courses 

Criminology 

CRIM 432 Law of Corrections. (3) Prerequi- 
site. LENF 230 or 234 and CRIM 220. A re- 
view of the law of criminal corrections from 
sentencing to final release or release on parole. 
Probation, punishments, special treatments 
for special offenders, parole and pardon, and 
the prisoner s civil nghts are also examined. 

CRIM 450 Juvenile Delinquency. (3) Pre- 
requisite. SOCY 100. Juvenile delinquency in 
relation to the general problem of cnme: an- 
alysis of factors underlying juvenile delin- 
quency: treatment and prevention. 

CRIM 451 Crime and Delinquency Preven- 
tion. (3) Prerequisites. CRIM 220 or CRIM 
450 or consent of instructor Methods and 
programs in prevention of cnme and delin- 
quency 

CRIM 452 Treatment of Criminals and De- 
linquents In the Community. (3) Prerequi- 
site. CRIM 220 or CRIM 450 or consent of 
instructor. Analysis of the processes and 
methods in the modification of cnminal pat- 
terns of behavior in a community setting. 

CRIM 453 Institutional Treatment of Crim- 
inals and Delinquents. (3) Prerequisite. 
CRIM 220 or CRIM 450 or consent of in- 



structor History, organization and functions 
of penal and correctional institutions for 
adults and juveniles. 

CRIM 454 Contemporary Criminological 
Theory. (3) Prerequisite. CRIM 220. CRIM 
450. and CRIM 451 or CRIM 452 or CRIM 
453, Bnef histoncal overview of cnmino- 
logical theory up to the 50s. Deviance. Latjel- 
ing Typologies. Most recent research in cnm* 
inalistic sutx;ultures and middle class delin- 
quency Recent proposals for decriminal- 
ization . 

CRIM 498 Selected Topics in Criminology. 

(3) Topics of special interest to advanced 
undergraduates in cnmmology Such 
courses will be offered in response to student 
request and faculty interest. No more than six 
credits may t>e taken by a student in selected 
topics. 

CRIM 610 Research Methods in Criminal 
Justice and Criminology. (3) Prerequisite 
completion of research methods and statis- 
tics requirements for the M. A. degree. Examina- 
tion of special research problems and tech- 
niques 

CRIM 650 Advanced Criminology. (3) First 
semester. Survey of the pnncipal issues in 
contemporary criminological theory and re- 
search. 

CRIM 651 Seminar in Criminology. (3) 

Second semester. 

CRIM 652 Seminar in Juvenile Delin- 
quency. (3) Frst semester 

CRIM 653 Crime and Delinquency as a 
Community Problem. (3) Second semester. 

An intensive study of selected problems in 
adult cnme and juvenile delinquency in 
Maryland. 

CRIM 654 History of Criminological 
Thought. (3) Prerequisite: CRIM 454 or its 
equivalent. A study of the development of 
criminological thought from antiquity to the 
present. 

CRIM 699 Special Criminological Prob- 
lems. (3) 
CRIM 799 Master's Thesis Research. (1-6) 

CRIM 899 Doctoral Dissertation Research. 
(1-8) Doctoral dissertation research in cnm- 
inal justice and cnminology 

Institute of Criminal Justice 
LENF 444 Advanced Law Enforcement 
Administration. (3) Prerequisite. LENF 340 
or consent of instructor The structuring of 
manpower, material, and systems to accom- 
plish the major goals of social control. Person- 
nel and systems management. Political con- 
trols and limitations on authority and jurisdic- 
tion. 

LENF 455 Dynamics of Planned Change in 
Criminal Justice I. (3) Prerequisite: consent 
of instructor. An examination of conceptual 
and practical issues related to planned 
change in criminal justice Emphasis on the 
development of Innovative ideas using a re- 
search and development approach to 
change, 

LENF 456 Dynamics of Planned Change in 
Criminal Justice II. (3) Prerequisite: LENF 
455 or consent of instnjctor. An examination 
of conceptual and practical issues related to 



planned change in cnminal justice. Emphasis 
on change strategies and tactics which are 
appropriate for criminal justice personnel in 
entry level positions, 

LENF 462 Special Problems in Security 
Administration. (3) Prerequisites. LENF 
360 and consent of instructor. An advanced 
course for students desinng to focus on 
specific concerns in the study of pnvate 
security organizations: business intelligence 
and espionage: vulnerability and crtticality 
analyses in physical security: transportation, 
banking, hospital and military secunty prot)- 
lems: uniformed secunty forces: national 
defense information: and others, 

LENF 498 Selected Topics in Criminal 
Justice. (1-6) Prerequisite, consent of in- 
structor Supervised study of a selected topic 
to be announced in the field of cnminal 
justice. Repeatable to a maximum of six 
credits. 

LENF 600 Criminal Justice (3) Prerequi- 
sites, admission to the graduate program in 
cnminal justice or consent of instnjctor. Cur- 
rent concept of cnminal justice in relationship 
to other concepts in the field. Historical per- 
spective. Cnminal justice and social control. 
Operational implications. Systemic Aspects. 
Issues of evaluation. 

LENF 630 Seminar in Criminal Law and 
Society. (3) Prerequisite. LENF 230 or its 
equivalent and a course in introductory crim- 
inology. The cnminal law is studied in the con- 
text of general studies in the area of the 
sociology of law. The evolution and social 
and psychological factors affecting the fonnu- 
lation and administration of cnminal laws are 
discussed. Also examined is the impact of 
criminal laws and their sanctions on behavior 
in the light of recent empirical evidence. 

LENF 640 Seminar in Criminal Justice 
Administration. (3) Prerequisites one 
course In the theory of groups or organiza- 
tions, one course in administration: or con- 
sent of instructor. Examination of extemal 
and internal factors that currently impact on 
police administration. Intra-organizational re- 
lationships and policy formulation: the conver- 
sion of inputs into decisions and policies. 
Strategies for formulating, implementing and 
assessing administrative decisions, 

LENF 699 Special Problems in Criminal 
Justice. (1-3) Prerequisite, consent of in- 
stnjctor. Supervised study of a selected prob- 
lem in the field of criminal justice, Repeatable 
to a maximum of 6 credits 

LENF 720 Criminal Justice System Plan- 
ning. (3) Prerequisites: one course in cnmi- 
nal justice and one course in research metho- 
dology. System theory and method: examina- 
tion of planning methods and models based 
pnmarily on a systems approach to the opera- 
tions of the cnminal justice system, 

LENF 799 Master's Thesis Research. (1-6) 



Early Childhood-Elemen- 
tary Education Program 

Professor and Chairman: Sublett 
Professors: Ashlock, Duffey. Leeper, 

O'Neill. Weaver, J. Wilson, R. Wilson 
Associate Professors: Amershek. 



Graduate Programs / 89 



Church, Dietz, Eley, Gantt, 
Heidelbach, Herman, Jantz, Johnson, 
Roderick, Seefeldt, Sullivan, Williams 
Assistant Professors: Evans, Hill, 

Knifong, Madison, Schumacher, Sunal 

Graduate programs leading to M.A., 
M.Ed., E.Ed., and Ph.D. degrees in 
the Department of Early Childhood- 
Elementary Education are designed 
to prepare teachers, curriculum 
specialists, supervisors, ad- 
ministrators, and higher education 
instructors to function effectively in 
leadership positions in programs for 
young children. 

Students have opportunities to 
specialize in any of the following 
areas: early childhood education, 
elementary education, reading 
science education, mathematics 
education, language arts, social 
studies education, or nursery-kinder- 
garten education. 

Admission and Degree Information 

Masters Degree programs average 
30-36 semester hours. D.Ed, and 
Ph.D. programs average 90 semester 
hours, including work at the 
master's level. All applicants must 
submit the Miller Analogy Test score 
as prerequisite to admission. 

Programs, particularly at the doc- 
toral level, are individualized to 
reflect the student's background and 
to meet his particular career goals. 
Regular counseling with an advisor 
is an important aspect of each pro- 
gram. An effort is made to ascertain 
that graduate programs include both 
theory and practicum, professional 
work and academic courses. 

There is a comprehensive ex- 
amination near the completion of 
work at the master's level. The Ph.D. 
program includes a preliminary ex- 
amination after approximately 12 
semester hours of work and a com- 
prehensive examination near the 
completion of the program. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

Special facilities for graduate study 
Include the Reading Center, the 
Science Teaching Center, the 
Arithmetic Center, the Teacher 
Education Centers in local schools, 
and the Center for Young Children. 

Financial Assistance 

The Department is able to give finan- 
cial aid, in the form of graduate 
assistantships, to students of pro- 
ven ability who have had public 
school teaching experience. 

90 / Graduate Programs 



Courses 

EDEL 401 Science in Early Childhood 
Education. (3) Designed primarily to help 
in-service teachers, nursery school 
through grade 3, to acquire general 
science understandings and to develop 
teaching materials for practical use in 
classrooms. Includes experiments, 
demonstrations, constructions, observa- 
tions, field trips and use of audio-visual 
materials. The emphasis is on content 
and method related to science units in 
common use in nursery school through 
grade 3. Offered during summer ses- 
sions and in off-campus programs taught 
through University College. Ordinarily 
there is no field placement. 

EOEL 402 Science in the Elementary 
School. (3) Designed primarily to help in- 
service teachers, grades 1-6, to acquire 
general science understandings and to 
develop teaching materials for practical 
use in classrooms. Includes ex- 
periments, demonstrations, construc- 
tions, observations, field trips and use of 
audio-visual materials. The emphasis is 
on content and method related to 
science units in common use in grades 
1-6. Offered during summer sessions and 
in off-campus programs taught through 
University College. Ordinarily there is no 
field placement. 

EDEL 404 Language Arts in Early Child- 
hood Education. (3) Teaching of spelling, 
handwriting, oral and w/ritten expression 
and creative expression. Designed 
primarily for in-service teachers, nursery 
school through grade 3. Offered during 
summer sessions and in off-campus pro- 
grams taught through University College. 
Ordinarily, there is no field placement. 

EDEL 405 Language Arts in the Elemen- 
tary School. (3) Teaching of spelling, 
handvi/riting, oral and Vi'ritten expression 
and creative expression. Designed pri- 
marily for in-service teachers, grades 1-6. 
Offered during summer sessions and in 
off-campus programs taught through 
University College. Ordinarily there is no 
field placement. 

EDEL 406 Social Studies in Early Child- 
hood Education. (3) Consideration given 
to curriculum, organization and methods 
of teaching, evaluation of newer 
materials and utilization of environmental 
resources. Designed for in-service 
teachers, nursery school through grade 
3. Offered during summer sessions and 
in off-campus programs taught through 
University College. Ordinarily there is no 
field placement. 

EDEL 407 Social Studies in the Elemen- 
tary School. (3) Consideration given to 
curriculum, organization and methods of 
teaching, evaluation of newer materials 
and utilization of environmental 
resources. Designed for in-service 
teachers, grades 1-6. Offered during sum- 
mer session and in off-campus programs 
taught through University College. Or- 
dinarily there is no field placement. 

EDEL 410 The Child and the Curriculum 
— Early Childhood. (3) Relationship of 
the school curriculum, nursery school 



through grade 3, to child growth and 
development. Recent trends in cur- 
riculum organization; the effect of en- 
vironment on learning; readiness to learn; 
and adapting curriculum content and 
methods to maturity levels of children. 
Designed tor in-service teachers, nursery 
school through grade 3. Offered during 
summer sessions and in off-campus pro- 
grams taught through University College. 
Ordinarily there is no field placement. 

EDEL 411 The Child and the Curriculum 
— Elementary. (3) Relationship of the 
school curriculum, grades 1-6, to child 
growth and development. Recent trends 
in curriculum organization; the effect of 
environment on learning; readiness to 
learn; and adapting curriculum content 
and methods to maturity levels of 
children. Designed for in-service 
teachers, grades 1-6. Offered during sum- 
mer sessions and in off-campus pro- 
grams taught through University College. 
Ordinarily there is no field placement. 

EDEL 412 Art in the Elementary School. 

(3) Concerned with art methods and 
materials for elementary schools. In- 
cludes laboratory experiences with 
materials appropriate for elementary 
schools. 

EDEL 413 Mathematics in Early 
Childhood Education. (3) Prerequisite, 
MATH 210 or equivalent. Emphasis on 
materials and procedures which help 
pupils sense arithmetic meanings and 
relationships. Designed to help in-service 
teachers, nursery school through grade 
3, gain a better understanding of the 
number system and arithmetical pro- 
cesses. Offered during summer sessions 
and in off-campus programs taught 
through University College. Ordinarily 
there is no field placement. 

EDEL 414 Mathematics in the Elementary 
School. (3) Prerequisite, MATH 210 or 
equivalent. Emphasis on materials and 
procedures which help pupils sense 
arithmetic meanings and relationships. 
Designed to help in-service teachers, 
grades 1-6, gain a better understanding 
of the number system and arithmetical 
processes. Offered during summer ses- 
sions and in off-campus programs taught 
through University College. Ordinarily 
there is no field placement. 

EDEL 415 Diagnosis and Treatment of 
Learning Disabilities in Mathematics I. (3) 

Prerequisite, EDEL 351 or equivalent and 
approval of instructor. Diagnosis and 
treatment of disabilities in mathematics. 
Theoretical models, specific diagnostic 
and instructional techniques and 
materials useful for working with 
children in both clinical and classroom 
settings. Case studies with children 
previously diagnosed as primarily correc- 
tive rather than severely disabled. Clinic 
hours to be arranged. 

EDEL 417 Social Studies and Multiethnic 
Education. (3) Prerequisites; a preservice 
social studies methods course or permis- 
sion of the instructor. Seminars will be 
held relating to general social science 
principles that are applicable to 



multiethnic education as a component of 
social studies instruction. Cultural ex- 
periences arranged on an independent 
basis for each participant. 

EDEL 424 Literature for Children and 
Young People, Advanced. (3) Develop- 
ment of literary materials for children 
and young people. Timeless and ageless 
books, and outstanding examples of con- 
temporary publishing. Evaluation of the 
contributions of individual authors and il- 
lustrators and children's book awards. 

EDEL 425 The Teaching of Reading — 
Early Childhood. (3) Concerned with the 
fundamentals of developmental reading 
instruction, including reading readiness, 
use of experience stories, procedures in 
using basal readers, the improvement of 
comprehension, teaching reading in all 
areas of the curriculum, uses of 
children's literature, the program in word 
analysis, and procedures for determining 
individual needs. Designed for in-service 
teachers, nursery school through grade 
3. Offered during summer sessions and 
in off-campus programs taught through 
University College. Ordinarily, there is no 
field placement. 

EDEL 426 The Teaching of Reading — 
Elementary. (3) Concerned with the fun- 
damentals of developmental reading in- 
struction, including reading readiness, 
use of experience stories, procedures in 
using basal readers, the improvement of 
comprehension, teaching reading in all 
areas of the curriculum, uses of 
children's literature, the program in word 
analysis, and procedures for determining 
individual needs. Designed for in-service 
teachers, grades 1-6. Offered during sum- 
mer sessions and in off-campus pro- 
grams taught through University College. 
Ordinarily, there is no field placement. 

EDEL 427 The Reading Process. (1-3) 

Prerequisite: consent of the department. 
A survey of the reading process to pro- 
vide needed knowledge for graduate 
studies in reading. Students will be 
pretested prior to registration and take 
only those modules of the course iden- 
tified as needed. 

EDEL 430 Corrective-Remedial Reading 
Instruction. (3) Prerequisite: EDEL/EDSE 
427 or equivalent, and consent of the 
department. For teachers, supervisors, 
and administrators who wish to identify 
and assist pupils with reading dif- 
ficulties. Concerned with diagnostic 
techniques, instructional materials and 
teaching procedures useful in the regular 
classroom. 

EDEL 431 Laboratory Practices in 
Reading. (3) Prerequisite, EDEL 430. A 
laboratory course in which each student 
has one or more pupils for analysis and 
instruction. At least one class meeting 
per week to diagnose individual cases 
and to plan instruction. 

EDEL 486 Special Topics in Elementary 
Education. (1-3) Prerequisite, consent of 
instructor. Special treatment of current 
topics and issues in elementary educa- 
tion. Repeatable to maximum of 6 
credits, provided content is different. 



EDEL 489 Field Experience In Education. 

(1-4) Prerequisites, at least six semester 
hours in education at the University of 
Maryland plus such other prerequisites 
as may be set by the major area in which 
the experience is to be taken. Planned 
field experience may be provided for 
selected students who have had 
teaching experience and whose applica- 
tion for such field experience has tseen 
approved by the education faculty. Field 
experience is offered in a given area to 
both major and nonmajor students. Note 
— the total number of credits which a 
student may earn in EDEL 489, 888, and 
889 is limited to a maximum of 20 
semester hours. 

EDEL 496 Special Problems in Education. 
(1-3) Prerequisite, consent of instructor. 
Available only to mature students who 
have definite plans for individual study of 
approved problems. 

EDEL 499 Workshops, Clinics, and In- 
stitutes. (1-6) The maximum number of 
credits that may be earned under this 
course symbol toward any degree is six 
semester hours; the symt)ol may be used 
two or more times until six semester 
hours have been reached. The following 
types of educational enterprise may be 
scheduled under this course heading: 
workshops conducted by the college of 
education (or developed cooperatively 
with other colleges and universities) and 
not otherwise covered in the present 
course listing; clinical experiences in 
pupil-testing centers, reading clinics, 
speech therapy laboratories, and special 
education centers; institutes developed 
around specific topics or problems and 
intended for designated groups such as 
school superintendents, principals and 
supervisors. 

EDEL 600 Seminar in Elementary Educa- 
tion. (3) Primarily for individuals who 
wish to write seminar papers. Prere- 
quisite, at least 12 hours of graduate 
work in education. 

EDEL 601 Problems in Teaching Science 
in Elementary Schools. (3) Prerequisite: 
EDEL 353 or 402 or consent of the in- 
structor. Analysis of the teaching of 
science to children through (1) the identi- 
fication of problems to teaching science, 
(2) the investigation and study of 
research reports related to the identified 
problems, and (3) the hypothesizing of 
methods for improving the effectiveness 
of science education for children. 

EDEL 605 Problems of Teaching 
Language Arts in Elementary Schools. (3) 

Prerequisite, EDEL 404 or approval of in- 
structor. This course is designed to allow 
each student an opportunity (1) to 
analyze current issues, trends, and prob- 
lems in language-arts instruction in 
terms of research in fundamental educa- 
tional theory and the language arts, and 
(2) to use this analysis in effecting 
changes in methods and materials for 
classroom instruction. 

EDEL 607 Problems of Teaching Social 
Studies in Elementary Schools. (3) Prere- 
quisite, EDEL 406 or approval of instruc- 



tor. An examination of current literature 
and research reports in the social 
sciences and in social studies cur- 
riculum design and instruction, with an 
emphasis on federally-sponsored pro- 
jects as well as programs designed for 
urban children. 

EDEL 614 Elementary School 
Mathematics Curricula. (3) Prerequisite, 
EDEL 314 or equivalent and approval of 
instructor. Critical evaluation of past and 
present curricular projects, experimental 
programs, and instructional materials. 
Design and implementation of elemen- 
tary school mathematics curricula. 

EDEL 615 Diagnosis and Treatment of 
Learning Disabilities in Mathematics II. 

(3) Prerequisite, EDEL 415 or equivalent 
and approval of instructor. Diagnosis and 
treatment of severe learning disabilities 
in elementary school mathematics. 
Theoretical models, relevant research 
and scientific techniques appropriate for 
accessing the interaction of subject mat- 
ter, organismic, and instructional 
variables will be developed. Clinic hours 
for case study work to be arranged, 
arranged. 

EDEL 618 Practicum in Diagnosis and 
Treatment of Learning Disabilities in 
Mathematics. (3) Prerequisite, EDEL 615 
or equivalent and approval of instructor. 
Case studies under supervision with 
children experiencing learning dif- 
ficulties in mathematics. Diagnostic 
treatment, and reporting procedures 
developed in EDEL 415 and 615. Course 
may be repeated to a maximum 
of 6 hours. 

EDEL 624 Reading Diagnostic Assess- 
ment and Prescription. (3) Prerequisites: 
12 credits of graduate study in educa- 
tion, or consent of instructor. Survey 
course in reading diagnosis and prescrip- 
tion for graduate students not majoring 
in reading. The interpretation of reading 
diagnostic techniques with an overview 
of various prescriptions based on 
diagnosis. 

EDEL 626 Problems in the Teaching of 
Reading in the Elementary School. (3) Im- 
plications of current theory and the 
results of research for the teaching of 
reading in the elementary school. Atten- 
tion is given to all areas of developmen- 
tal reading instruction, with special em- 
phasis on persistent problems. 

EDEL 627 Clinical Assessment in 
Reading. (3) Prerequisites: EDEL 430, 
EDEL 626, EDMS 446 and EDMS 622. 
Clinical diagnostic techniques and 
materials useful to the reading specialist 
in assessing serious reading difficulties. 

EDEL 630 Clinical Remediation of 
Reading Disabilities. (3) Prerequisites: 
EDEL 430, EDEL 626, EDMS 446 and 622. 
Remedial procedures and materials 
useful to the reading specialist in plan- 
ning programs of individual and small 
group instruction. 

EDEL 631 Advanced Laboratory Practices 
(Diagnosis). (3) Prerequisite: EDEL 630. 
Diagnostic work with children in clinic 



Graduate Programs / 91 



and school situations. Administration, 
scoring, interpretation, and prescription 
via diagnostic instruments is stressed. 
Case report writing and conferences are 
also stressed. EDEL 631 is taken with 
EDEL632. 

EDEL 632 Advanced Laboratory Practices 
(Instruction). (3) Prerequisite, EDEL 630. 
Remedial instruction with children in 
clinic and school situations. Develop 
competency in various remedial techni- 
ques, diagnostic teaching and evalua- 
tion. Development of the reading 
resource role is stressed. EDEL 632 is 
taken with EDEL 631. 

EDEL 636 Communications and the 
School Curriculum. (3) Curriculum 
development based on communication 
as the major vehicle for describing the 
learner's interactions with persons, 
knowledge, and materials in the 
classroom and school environment. 

EDEL 640 Curriculum Planning in 
Nursery-Kindergarten Education. (3) An 

examination of significant new 
developments in curriculum theory and 
practice. 

EDEL 641 The Young Child In the Com- 
munity. (3) Planned observation, related 
research, and analysis of the experiences 
of young children in such community 
centers as foster homes, orphanages, 
day care centers, Sunday schools, etc. 
One-half day a week observation re- 
quired. 

EDEL 642 The Young Child in School. (3) 

An examination of significant theory and 
research on the characteristics of young 
children which have special implications 
for teaching children in nursery-kinder- 
garten groups. 

EDEL 643 Teacher-Parent Relationships. 

(3) A study of the methods and materials, 
trends, and problems in establishing 
close home-school relationships. 

EDEL 644 Intellectual and Creative Ex- 
periences of the Nursery-Kindergarten 
Child. (3) A critical examination of 
materials, methods and programs in 
such areas as reading, literature, 
science, mathematics, the social studies, 
art, music, dance, etc. 

EDEL 650 Seminar in Early Childhood 
Education. (3) A problem seminar in early 
childhood education. Prerequisites: At 
least 12 hours of graduate work in early 
childhood education. 

EDEL 651 Staffing in Early Childhood 
Programs. (3) Prerequisite: admission to 
doctoral programs in early childhood 
education or educational administration; 
administrative experience or consent of 
instructor. 

EDEL 652 Education and Group Care of 
the Infant and Young Child. (3) Prereq- 
uisite: EDMS 446 or consent of the in- 
structor. The historical, theoretical and 
empirical basis for the group care and 
education of young children with special 
emphasis on the child under the age of 
three. 

92 / Graduate Programs 



EDEL 653 Curriculum Innovations in Ear- 
ly Childhood-Elementary Science Educa- 
tion. (3) Prerequisite: consent of instruc- 
tor. A study of the most recently 
developed curricula in early childhood- 
elementary science education including 
the psychological basis of each science 
curriculum: analysis of the components 
of each curriculum: and interaction with 
early childhood-elementary school 
children using selected activities from 
science curricula. 

EDEL 701 Seminar in Research and 
Development of Science Education for 
Children. (3) Prerequisites: EDEL 601 and 
EDEL 653; or consent of instructor. The 
development of science education for 
children: the study, description and inter- 
pretation of science education research 
reports; the identification and critical 
analysis of one specific topic in early 
childhood-elementary science education; 
and the development of a research pro- 
posal for an investigation designed to 
further the student's knowledge of the 
selected topic in early childhood- 
elementary science education. 

EDEL 707 Elementary School Social 
Studies Research. (3) Prerequisites: 
EDEL 607, EDMS 446, and 12 graduate 
hours in the social sciences. The iden- 
tification of a significant problem in 
elementary school social studies, the 
design and execution of a research study 
to resolve the problem. Intended for ad- 
vanced graduate student whose concen- 
tration is in elementary school social 
studies. 

EDEL 719 Research Seminar in Teaching 
and Learning of Elementary School 
Mathematics. (3) Prerequisite, EDMS 446 
and EDEL 614 or equivalents. Critical 
evaluation of past and current research, 
formulation of researchable questions, 
design and conduct of research in the 
teaching and learning of elementary 
school mathematics. Course may be 
repeated to a maximum of 6 hours. 

EDEL 726 Research Design in Early 
Childhood Education. (3) Prerequisites: 
EDMS 646 or equivalent. Provides oppor- 
tunity for designing and conducting 
research with children from birth to eight 
years of age based on reviews, evalua- 
tions and discussions of significant and 
relevant early childhood research 
literature. 

EDEL 788 Special Topics in Elementary 
Education. (1-3) Prerequisite, consent of 
instructor. Special and intensive treat- 
ment of current topics and issues in 
elementary education. Repeatable to 
maximum of 6 credits. 

EDEL 798 Special Problems in Education. 

(1-6) Master's, AGS, or doctoral can- 
didates who desire to pursue special 
research problems under the direction of 
their advisers may register for credit 
under this number. Course card must 
have the title of the problem and the 
name of the faculty member under whom 
the work will be done. 



EDEL 799 IVIaster's Thesis Research. (1-6) 

Registration required to the extent of six 
hours for master's thesis. 

EDEL 888 Apprenticeship in Education. 

(1-9) Apprenticeships in the major area of 
study are available to selected students 
whose application for an apprenticeship 
has been approved by students whose 
application for an apprenticeship 
has been approved by the education 
faculty. Each apprentice is assigned to 
work for at least a semester full-time or 
the equivalent with an appropriate staff 
member of a cooperating school, school 
system, or educational institution or 
agency. The sponsor of the apprentice 
maintains a close working relationship 
with the apprentice and the other per- 
sons involved. Prerequisites, teaching ex- 
perience, a master's degree in education, 
and at least six semester hours in educa- 
tion at the University of Maryland. NOTE: 
The total number of credits which a stu- 
dent may earn in EDEL 489, 888 and 889 
is limited to a maximum of twenty (20) 
semester hours. 

EDEL 889 Internship in Education. (3-16) 

Internships in the major area of study are 
available to selected students who have 
teaching experience. The following 
groups of students are eligible: (A) any 
student who has been advanced to can- 
didacy for the doctor's degree; and (B) 
any student who receives special ap- 
proval by the education faculty for an in- 
ternship, provided that prior to taking an 
internship, such student shall have com- 
pleted at least 60 semester hours of 
graduate work, including at least six 
semester hours in education at the 
University of Maryland. Each intern is 
assigned to work on a full-time basis for 
at least a semester with an appropriate 
staff member in a cooperating school, 
school system, or educational institution 
or agency. The internship must be taken 
in a school situation different from the 
one where the student is regularly 
employed. The intern's sponsor main- 
tains a close working relationship with 
the intern and the other persons in- 
volved. NOTE: The total number of 
credits which a student may earn in 
EDEL 489, 888, and 889 is limited to a 
maximum of twenty (20) semester hours. 

EDEL 899 Doctoral Dissertation 
Research. (1-8) Registration required to 
the extent of 6-9 hours for an Ed.D. Pro- 
ject and 12-18 hours for a Ph.D. disserta- 
tion. 



Economics Program 

Professor and Chairman: Marris 

Professors: Aaron, Adelman, Almon, 
Bailey, Bergmann, Cumberland, 
Dillard, Fisher, Dorsey, Gruchy, 
Harris, Kelejian, McGuire, O'Connell 
Olson, Schultze, Straszheim, Ulmer, 
Wonnacott 

Associate Professors: Adams, Bennett, 
Betancourt, Glague, Dodge, Knight, 
McLoone, Meyer, Singer, Weinstein 

Assistant Professors: Brown, Glotfelter, 
Dorman, Johnson, King, Lieberman, 



Pelcovits, Snower, Vavrichek, Weiss, 
West 
Lecturers: Dardis, Fleisig, Measday, 
Quails 

Programs are offered leading to the 
[blaster of Arts and Doctor of Pfiilos- 
ophy degrees. Areas of specializa- 
tion include: economic theory, ad- 
vanced economic theory, com- 
parative economic systems and 
planning, econometrics, economic 
development, economic history, en- 
vironmental and natural resource 
economics, history of economic 
thought, industrial organization, in- 
stitutional economics, international 
economics, labor economics, 
monetary economics, public finance, 
regional and urban economics, and 
social policy. 

Admission and Degree Information 

Applicants should have taken (or 
should plan to take immediately) at 
least one undergraduate course in 
each of micro-economics, macro- 
economics, statistics, and calculus. 
In addition, the Aptitude Test sec- 
tion of the Graduate Record Ex- 
amination is required, and the Ad- 
vanced Economics Test is recom- 
mended. Letters of recommendation 
from three persons competent to 
judge the probability of the ap- 
plicant's success in graduate school 
should be sent directly to the Direc- 
tor of Graduate Studies in 
Economics. While part-time 
graduate study certainly is possible, 
few courses are taught at night. 

The Master of Arts degree in Eco- 
nomics may be taken under either (1) 
the thesis option (24 hours plus a 
thesis) or (2) the non-thesis option 
(30 hours, including Economics 
621-622, plus a written examination 
in Economic Theory and a seminar 
paper). The requirements for the 
nonthesis option for the M.A. are 
met automatically in the course of 
the Ph.D. program in Economics. 

The main requirements of the 
Ph.D. program are (1) a written ex- 
amination in economic theory, nor- 
mally taken at the beginning of the 
second year of full-time graduate 
study; (2) written examinations in 
two approved optional fields; (3) a 
comprehensive oral examination 
covering economic theory and the 
two optional fields; (4) two courses 
(Econ 621-622) in Quantitative 
Methods in Economics; (5) two 
courses (Econ 606-607) in the 



History of Economic Thought; (6) 
foreign language or one of several 
options; (7) a seminar paper to be 
available to the faculty at the time of 
the oral comprehensive examination; 
(8) a dissertation and its successful 
oral defense. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

The graduate program in Economics 
is a comprehensive one. The depart- 
ment possesses special strength in 
the Economics of the Public Sector. 
Special research projects under the 
supervision of faculty members are 
being carried on In the Economics of 
Environmental Management and In- 
terindustry Forecastings. 

Financial Assistance 

Research assistantships are avail- 
able in each of the special projects. 
Numerous teaching assistantships 
are also available. The department 
can usually help graduate students 
find half-time employment in nearby 
Federal agencies engaged in 
economic research. 

Additional Information 

A complete description of the re- 
quirements of the degrees in 
economics and the admission pro- 
cess is available on request from: 
Director of Graduate Studies in 
Economics, Department of 
Economics, University of Maryland. 

Courses 

ECON 401 National Income Analysis. (3) 

Prerequisite — ECON 201, 203. Required 
for economics majors. Analysis of the 
determination of national income, 
employment, and price levels. Discus- 
sion of consumption, Investment, infla- 
tion, and government fiscal and 
monetary policy. 

ECON 402 Business Cycles. (3) First 
semester. Prerequisite, ECON 430. A 
study of the causes of depressions and 
unemployment, cyclical and secular in- 
stability, theories of business cycles, and 
the problem of controlling economic in- 
stability. 

ECON 403 Intermediate Price Theory. (3) 

Prerequisite — ECON 201, 203. Required 
for economics majors. An analysis of the 
theories of consumer behavior and of the 
firm, and of general price and distribu- 
tion theory, with applications to current 
economic issues. 

ECON 407 Contemporary Economic 
Thought. (3) Prerequisites — ECON 201, 
203, and senior standing. Graduate 
students should take ECON 705. A 
survey of the development of economic 
thought since 1900 vi/ith special 
reference to Thorstein Veblin and other 



pre-1939 instltutionalists and to 
post-1945 neoinstitutionalists such as 
J.K. Galbraith and Gunnar Myrdal. 

ECON 415 Introduction to Economic 
Development of Underdeveloped Areas. 

(3) Prerequisite, ECON 201 and 203; or 
205. An analysis of the economic and 
social characteristics of underdeveloped 
areas. Recent theories of economic 
development, obstacles to development, 
policies and planning for development. 

ECON 418 Economic Development of 
Selected Areas. (3) A — Latin America B 
— Asia C — Africa. Prerequisite, ECON 
415. Institutional characteristics of a 
specific area are discussed and alternate 
strategies and policies for development 
are analyzed. 

ECON 421 Economic Statistics. (3) Pre- 
requisite MATH 110 or equivalent. Not 
open to students who have taken BSAD 
230 or BSAD 231 . An introduction to the 
use of statistics in economics. Topics in- 
clude: probability, random variables and 
their distributions, sampling theory, 
estimation, hypothesis testing, analysis 
of variance, regression analysis, correla- 
tion. 

ECON 422 Quantitative Methods in 
Economics. (3) Prerequisites, ECON 201, 
203, and 421 (or BSAD 230); or permis- 
sion of instructor. Emphasizes the in- 
teraction between the economic prob- 
lems posed by economists and the 
assumptions employed in statistical 
theory. Deals with the formulation, esti- 
mation and testing of economic models. 
Topics include single variable and multi- 
ple variable regression techniques. 
Theory of identification, autocorrelation 
and simultaneous equations. Indepen- 
dent work relating the material in the 
course to an economic problem chosen 
by the student is required. 

ECON 425 Mathematical Economics. (3) 

Prerequisites, ECON 401 and 403 and 
one year of college mathematics. A 
course designed to enable economics 
majors to understand the simpler 
aspects of mathematical economics. 
Those parts of the calculus and algebra 
required for economic analysis will be 
presented. 

ECON 430 Money and Banking. (3) Pre- 
requisite, ECON 201, 203. Relation of 
money and credit to economic activity 
and prices; impact of public policy in 
financial markets and for goods and ser- 
vices; policies, structure, and functions 
of the federal reserve system; organiza- 
tion, operation, and functions of the 
commercial banking system, as related 
particularly to questions of economic 
stability and public policy. 

ECON 431 Theory of Money, Prices and 
Economic Activity. (3) Prerequisite. 
ECON 430. A theoretical treatment of the 
influence of money and financial markets 
on economic activity and prices, and of 
the effects of monetary policy on the 
markets for goods and services; the role 
of money in the classical and Keynesian 
macro-systems; topics of theoretical in- 

Qraduate Programs / 93 



terest in monetary policy formation and 
implementation. ■ 

ECON 440 International Economics. (3) 

Prerequisite, ECON 201, 203. A descrip- 
tive and theoretical analysis of interna- 
tional trade, balance of payments ac- 
counts, the mechanism of international 
economic adjustment, comparative 
costs, economics of customs unions. 

ECON 441 International Economic 
Policies. (3) Prerequisites, ECON 401, 
403, and 440. Contemporary balance of 
payments problems; the international liq- 
uidity controversy investment, trade and 
economic development; evaluation of 
arguments for protection. 

ECON 450 Introduction to Public 
Finance. (3) Prerequisite, ECON 201, 203; 
or ECON 205. The role of federal, state, 
and local governments in meeting public 
wants. Analysis of tax theory and policy, 
expenditure theory, government 
budgeting, benefit-cost analysis, and in- 
come redistribution. 

ECON 451 Public Choice and Public 
Policy. (3) Prerequisite: ECON 201, 203, 
or 205. Analysis of collective decision- 
making, economic models of govern- 
ment, program budgeting, and policy im- 
plementation; emphasis on models of 
public choice and institutions vi^hich af- 
fect decision-making. 

ECON 454 State and Local Public 
Finance. (3) Prerequisite, ECON 201 and 
203; or 205. Principles and problems of 
governmental finance with special 
reference to state and local jurisdictions. 
Topics to be covered include taxation, 
expenditures and intergovernmental 
fiscal relations. 

ECON 460 Industrial Organization. (3) 

Prerequisite, ECON 201 and 203; or 205. 
Changing structure of the American 
economy; price policies in different in- 
dustrial classifications of monopoly and 
competition in relation to problems of 
public policy. 

ECON 471 Current Problems in Labor 
Economics. (3) Prerequisite, ECON 470. 
For students who wish to pursue, in 
depth, selected topics in the labor field. 
Issues and topics selected for detailed 
examination may include: manpower 
training and development, unemploy- 
ment compensation and social security, 
race and sex discrimination in employ- 
ment, wage theory, productivity analysis. 
The problems of collective bargaining in 
public employment, wage-price controls 
and incomes policy. 

ECON 474 Economic Problems of 
Women. (3) Prerequisite, ECON 201, 
203; or 205. Discrimination against 
women in the labor market; the division 
of labor in the home and the workplace 
by sex; the 'child care industry'; women 
in poverty. 

ECON 475 Economics of Poverty and 
Discrimination. (3) Prerequisite, ECON 
201 and 203; or 205. Topics include the 
causes of the persistence of low income 
groups; the relation of poverty to 



technological change, to economic 
growth, and to education and training; 
economic motivations for discrimination; 
the economic lesults of discrimination; 
proposed remedies for poverty and 
discrimination. 

ECON 482 Economics of the Soviet 
Union. (3) Prerequisite, ECON 201 and 
203; or 205. An analysis of the organiza- 
tion, operating principles and perfor- 
mance of the Soviet economy with atten- 
tion to the historical and ideological 
background, planning, resources, in- 
dustry, agriculture, domestic and foreign 
trade, finance, labor, and the structure 
and growth of national income. 

ECON 484 The Economy of China. (3) 

Prerequisite, ECON 201 and 203; or 205. 
Policies and performances of the 
Chinese economy since 1949. Will begin 
with a survey of modern China's 
economic history. Emphasizes the 
strategies and institutional innovations 
that the Chinese have adopted to over- 
come the problems of economic develop- 
ment. Some economic controversies 
raised during the 'cultural revolution' will 
be covered in review of the problems and 
prospects of the present Chinese 
economy. 

ECON 486 The Economics of National 
Planning. (3) Prerequisite, ECON 201 and 
203; or 205. An analysis of the principles 
and practice of economic planning with 
special reference to the planning prob- 
lems of West European countries and 
the United States. 

ECON 490 Survey of Urban Economic 
Problems and Policies. (3) Prerequisites, 
ECON 201 and 203; or 205. An introduc- 
tion to the study of urban economics 
through the examination of current 
policy issues. Topics may include subur- 
banization of jobs and residences, hous- 
ing and urban renewal, urban transporta- 
tion, development of new towns, ghetto 
economic development, problems in ser- 
vices such as education and police. 

ECON 491 Economics and Control of Ur- 
ban Growth. (3) Prerequisite: ECON 490. 
An analysis of metropolitan development 
processes, the consequences of alter- 
native growth patterns, and the evalua- 
tion of policies to control growth. 

ECON 492 Economics of Location and 
Regional Growth. (3) Prerequisite, ECON 
403, or consent of instructor. Study of 
the theories, problems, and policies of 
regional economic development and the 
location of economic activity for both 
rural and metropolitan regions. Methods 
of regional analysis. 

ECON 601 Macro-Economic Analysis. (3) 

First semester of a two-semester se- 
quence, 601-602. Topics normally include 
general equilibrium theory in classical, 
Keynesian, and post-Keynesian 
treatments; the demand for money; 
theories of consumption behavior and of 
inflation. 

ECON 602 Economic Growth and In- 
stability. (3) Second semester. A con- 
tinuation of ECON 601. Major topics in- 



clude growth and technological change, 
investment, business cycles, and large 
empirial macroeconomic models. Also in- 
cluded are material on wages and 
employment and on international and 
domestic stability. 

ECON 603 Micro-Economic Analysis 1. (3) 

Prerequisite; a calculus course for con- 
current registration in ECON 621. The 
first semester of a two-semester se- 
quence which analyzes the usefulness 
and shortcomings of prices in solving 
the basic economic problem of allocating 
scarce resources among alternative 
uses. The central problem of welfare 
economics and general equilibrium as a 
framework for a detailed analysis of con- 
sumption and production theories in- 
cluding linear programming with deci- 
sions under uncertainty. 
ECON 604 Micro-Economic Analysis II. 
(3) Prerequisite; ECON 603. A continua- 
tion of ECON 603. Theory of capital, in- 
terest and wages. Qualifications of the 
basic welfare theorem caused by non- 
competitive .market structures, external 
economies and diseconomies and sec- 
ondary constraints. Application of price 
theory to public expenditure decisions, 
investment in human capital, interna- 
tional trade, and other areas of 
economics. 

ECON 605 Welfare Economics. (3) First 
semester. Prerequisite, ECON 603. The 
topics covered include pareto optimality, 
social welfare functions, indivisibilities, 
consumer surplus, output and price 
policy in public enterprise, and welfare 
aspects of the theory of public expen- 
ditures. 

ECON 606 History of Economic Thought. 

(3) First semester. Prerequisite, ECON 
403 or consent of the instructor, A study 
of the development of economic thought 
and theories including the Greeks, 
Romans, Canonists, Mercantilists, 
Physiocrats, Adam Smith, Malthus, 
Ricardo. Relation of ideas to economic 
policy. 

ECON 607 Economic Theory in the Nine- 
teenth Century. (3) Second semester. 
Prerequisite, ECON 606 or consent of the 
instructor. A study of nineteenth-century 
and twentieth-century schools of 
economic thought, particularly the 
classicists, neo-classists, Austrians, Ger- 
man historical school, American 
economic thought, the socialists, and 
Keynes. 

ECON 611 Seminar in American 
Economic Development. (3) 

ECON 613 Origins and Development of 
Capitalism. (3) Second semester. Studies 
the transition from feudalism to modern 
capitalistic economies in Western 
Europe. Whenever possible, this 
economic history is analyzed with the aid 
of tools of modern economics, and in the 
light of comparisons and contrasts with 
the less developed areas of the present 
day. 

ECON 615 Economic Development of 
Underdeveloped Areas. (3) First 



94 / Graduate Programs 



semester. Prerequisite, ECON 401 and 
403. An analysis of the forces con- 
tributing to and retarding economic 
progress in underdeveloped areas. 
Macro- and micro-economic aspects of 
development planning and strategy are 
emphasized. 

ECON 616 Seminar in Economic Develop- 
ment. (3) Second semester. Prerequisite, 
ECON 615 or consent of instructor. A 
continuation of ECON 615. Special em- 
phasis is on the application of economic 
theory in the institutional setting of a 
country or area of particular interest to 
the student. 

ECON 617 IMoney and Finance in 
Economic Development. (3) First 
semester. Economic theory, strategy and 
tactics for mobilizing real and financial 
resources to finance and accelerate 
economic development. Monetary, fiscal, 
and tax reform policy and practice by the 
government sector to design and imple- 
ment national development plans. 

ECON 621 Quantitative Economics i. (3) 

First semester An introduction to the 
theory and practice of statistical in- 
ference. Elements of computer program- 
ming and a review of mathematics ger- 
mane to this and other graduate 
economics courses are included. 

ECON 622 Quantitative Economics II (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, ECON 
621. Techniques of estimating relation- 
ships among economic variables. Multi- 
ple regression, the analysis of variance 
and covariance, and techniques for deal- 
ing in time series. Further topics in 
mathematics. 

ECON 655 Case Studies in Government 
Resource Allocation. (3) Case studies in 
cost-benefit analysis of government pro- 
grams and projects as a basis for the 
program budget system; and analysis of 
resource management in the public sec- 
tor of the economy. 

ECON 656 Public Sector Worl^sliop. (3) 

Second semester. Representative prob- 
lems in analysis for public decision mak- 
ing: measurement of benefits and costs; 
incommensurabilities in benefits, and 
ambiguities in cost; criteria for program 
and project selection; effects of uncer- 
tainty; time horizon considerations; joint 
costs and multiple benefits; non- 
quantifiable factors in decision analysis. 
Examples will be taken from current 
government programs. 

ECON 861 Advanced industrial Organiza- 
tion. (3) First semester. Prerequisite, 
ECON 401 and 403 or consent of instruc- 
tor. Analysis of market structure and its 
relation to market performance. 

ECON 662 Industrial Organization and 
Public Policy. (3) Second semester. Pre- 
requisite, ECON 661 or consent of in- 
structor. Analysis of the problems of 
public policy in regard to the structure, 
conduct, and performance of industry. 
Examination of anti-trust policy from the 
point of view of economic theory. 



ECON 671 Seminar in Labor Economics. 

(3) First semester. Formal models of 
labor demand, supply, utilization and 
price formation. Factors affecting labor 
supply; the determination of factor 
shares in an open economy; bargaining 
models, labor resources, trade union 
theories as they affect resource alloca- 
tion. 

ECON 672 Selected Topics in Labor 
Economics. (3) Second semester. The 
wage-price issue; public policy with 
respect to unions, labor-management 
relations, and the labor market; institu- 
tional aspects of the American labor 
movement; manpower development and 
training. 

ECON 682 Seminar in Economic Develop- 
ment of tlie Soviet Union. (3) Second 
semester. Prerequisite, ECON 482 or 
consent of instructor. Measurement and 
evaluation of Soviet economic growth 
including interpretation and use of 
Soviet statistics, measurement of na- 
tional income, fiscal policies, invest- 
ment, and technological change, plan- 
ning and economic administration, 
manpower and wage policies, foreign 
trade and aid. Selected topics in bloc 
development and reform. 

ECON 686 Economic Growth in Mature 
Economies. (3) First semester. Analysis 
of policies and problems for achieving 
stable economic growth in mature 
economics such as the United States, 
and the major West European countries. 

ECON 698 Selected Topics in 
Economics. (3) 

ECON 703 Advanced Economic Theory i. 

(3) Prerequisite: background in calculus 
and matrix algebra such as provided by 
ECON 621 and 622. Optimization tech- 
niques such as Lagrangian multipliers 
and linear programming. Mathematical 
treatment of general equilibrium, inclu- 
ding interindustry analysis, the theory 
of production, consumption, and wel- 
fare. 

ECON 704 Advanced Economic Theory II. 

(3) Prerequisite: ECON 703. Multi-sectoral 
growth models and questions of optimal 
growth. Last half of course consists of 
presentations of seminar papers. 

ECON 705 Seminar in Institutional 
Economic Theory. (3) Second semester. 
A study of the recent developments in 
the field of institutional economic theory 
in the United States and abroad. 

ECON 706 Seminar in Institutional 
Economic Theory. (3) 

ECON 721 Econometrics I. (3) First 
semester. Special topics in mathematical 
statistics necessary for understanding 
econometric theory, with particular em- 
phasis on multivariate analysis. The 
estimation of simultaneous equation 
systems, problems involving errors in 
variables, distributed lags, and spectral 
analysis. 

ECON 722 Seminar in Quantitative 
Economics. (3) Second semester. Pre- 
requisite, ECON 622 or consent of in- 



structor. Analysis of data sources for 
economic research; critical evaluation of 
previous and current quantitative 
economic studies; and class discussion 
and criticism of student research proj- 
ects. 

ECON 731 Monetary Theory and Policy. 

(3) First semester. An adequate 
knowledge of micro- and macro- 
economics is assumed. Theory of 
money, financial assets, and economic 
activity; review of classical, neo-classical 
and Keynesian contribution; emphasis 
on post-Keynesian contributions, in- 
cluding those of Tobin, Patinkin, Gurley- 
Shaw, Friedman, and others. 

ECON 732 Seminar in Monetary Theory 
and Policy (3) Second semester. Prereq- 
uisite, ECON 731 or consent of instruc- 
tor. Theory of the mechanisms through 
which central banking affects economic 
activity and prices; formation and im- 
plementation of monetary policy; 
theoretical topics in monetary policy. 

ECON 741 Advanced international 
Economic Relations. (3) First semester. 
The international mechanism of adjust- 
ment: price, exchange rate, and income 
changes. Comparative costs, factor en- 
dowments, and the gains from trade. 
Commercial policy and the theory of 
customs unions. 

ECON 742 Seminar in international 
Economic Relations. (3) Second 
semester. 

ECON 751 Advanced Theory of Public 
Finance. (3) Review of utility analysis to 
include the theory of individual con- 
sumer resource allocation and exchange 
and welfare implications. Effects of alter- 
native tax and subsidy techniques upon 
allocation, exchange, and welfare out- 
comes. Theories of public goods, their 
production, exchange and consumption. 
Principles of benefit-cost analysis for 
government decisions. 

ECON 752 Seminar in Public Finance. (3) 

Second semester. Theory of taxation and 
tax policy, with particular emphasis on 
income taxation; empirical studies; the 
burden of the public debt. Research 
paper by each student to be presented to 
seminar. 

ECON 761 The Economics of Technical 
Change. (3) Prerequisite, consent of in- 
structor. Determinants and impact of in- 
ventions and innovations. Qualitative and 
quantitative aspects of technical change 
both at the micro- and macro-economic 
levels and under different conditions of 
economic development. 

ECON 775 Seminar on the Economics of 
Poverty and Discrimination. (3) Prereq- 
uisites, ECON 621 and 622. A review of 
the economic literature in poverty and 
discrimination. The course will also func- 
tion as a workshop in which research of 
the staff and students is presented. 

ECON 776 Seminar in the Economics of 
Human Resources. (3) Prerequisite, con- 
sent of instructor. 



Graduate Programs / 95 



ECON 790 Advanced Urban Economics 

(3) Market processes and public policies 
as related to urban problems and metro- 
pol'tan change. Employment, housing, 
discrimination, transportation and the 
local public sector. 

ECON 791 Advanced Regional and Urban 
Economics. (3) First semester. Location 
theory and spatial distribution of 
economic activity: application of analytic 
methods, such as social accounting 
systems, economic base theory, input- 
output techniques, and industrial com- 
plex analysis to problems of regional 
development, environmental quality, and 
natural resource management. 

ECON 792 Regional and Urban 
Economics. (3) Theoretical and empirical 
analysis of the location and spatial 
distribution of economic activity. 
Analysis of regional growth and develop- 
ment. The study of analytical methods 
and forecasting models. 

ECON 799 Master's Thesis Research. 
(1-6) 

ECON 899 Doctoral Dissertation Re- 
search. (1-8) 

Electrical Engineering 
Program 

Professor and Chairman: Harger 
Professors: Chu^ Davisson, DeClaris. 

Hochuli, Kim^, Ligomenides, Lin, 

Nevi/comb. Reiser^. Taylor. Weiss-' 
Associate Professors: Basham, Emad. 

Ephremides. Lee. Levine. Pugsley. 

Rhee. Silio. Simons. Tretter. Zajac. 

Zaki 
Assistant Professors: Baras. Davis, 

Destler. Gallman. Paez. Striffler 
^joint appointment with Computer 

Science 
^joint appointment with Physics 
^joint appointment with Institute for 

Physical Sciences and Technology 

The Electrical Engineering Depart- 
ment offers graduate work leading to 
the Master of Science with or 
without thesis and the Doctor of 
Philosophy degrees with specializa- 
tion in biomedical engineering, cir- 
cuits, communication, computers, 
control, and electronphysics. In con- 
junction with his Graduate Advisor, 
each graduate student plans and 
pursues an individual study program 
which includes an appropriate se- 
quence of courses and a thesis or 
scholarly paper. 

Areas of study in Biomedical 
Engineering include neural and 
muscular control of movement in 
animals and man, neural electro- 
physiology, system and computer 
approaches to medical diagnostics 
and health care. 

Areas of study in Circuits em- 
phasize the analysis and synthesis 

96 / Graduate Programs 



of passive and active linear and 
nonlinear networks, microwave ac- 
tive circuit synthesis, integrated cir- 
cuits and devices, and computer 
aided designs. 

In Control, areas of study apply 
the mathematics of dynamical 
systems, optimization and random 
processes to the synthesis and 
analysis of control systems. Topics 
included are modern control system 
design methods, control systems 
with time delay, non-linear systems, 
discrete time systems, control and 
identification of stochastic systems, 
and control of distributed parameter 
systems. 

Areas of study in Communica- 
tions emphasize the mathematics of 
random processes and statistical in- 
ference, the analysis and design of 
communication systems, coding 
theory, optical communications, 
radar systems, digital signal pro- 
cessing, and communication net- 
works. 

Areas of study In Electrophysics 
include electromagnetic theory and 
applications (microwaves and optics, 
stochastic media, plasma propaga- 
tion), biological effects of 
microwaves, charged particle 
dynamics and accelerator design, in- 
cluding high-power microwave 
engineering applications of 
relativistic beams, controlled ther- 
monuclear fusion, and cyclotron 
design; quantum electronics (laser 
technology and non-linear optics): 
scattering systems. 
Admissions and Degree Information 
Present minimum requirement for 
admission to the Graduate School 
as an Electrical Engineering student 
is graduation from an ECPD ac- 
credited undergraduate program in 
Electrical Engineering with an 
average no lower than B. or similar 
undergraduate preparation in 
mathematics, computer science, 
physics, or other areas of engineer- 
ing or science. 

Requirement for the master's, 
thesis and nonthesis option, are not 
in excess of general Graduate 
School requirements for these 
degrees. All requirements must be 
completed within 5 years. 

Requirements for the Ph.D. degree 
include a minimum of 42 semester 
hours of graduate approved courses; 
a pass on the Ph.D. qualifying ex- 
amination; and completion of all 



dissertation and oral examination re- 
quirements. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

Among the up-to-date research 
laboratories and computational 
facilities within the department are 
the following: the Biomedical 
Laboratory is equipped with in- 
strumentation for studying the 
motor control mechanisms of man 
and animals. The Laboratory for 
Charged Particle Studies contains 
an ion beam facility for source 
development and ion implantation. 
The Computer Architecture Design 
Laboratory includes a PDP 1 1/40 for 
studies on computer structures. The 
System Simulation Laboratory con- 
tains a digital processor core and 
drum memory with analog hardware 
and graphics. The Gas Laser 
Laboratory is devoted to He-Ne and 
CO2 lasers while the Solid State 
Laser Laboratory features a mode- 
locked Nd glass laser and an injec- 
tion GaAs laser. The Integrated Cir- 
cuits Laboratory contains a full-line 
facility capable of producing 
monolithic, thin-film and MOS struc- 
tures. The Computational Facility 
contains conversational and remote- 
batch terminals to the University's 
IBM 7094 and UNIVAC 1 108 digital 
computers. The Electron Ring 
Research Laboratory has facilities 
for studying beam diagnostic, forma- 
tion of electron rings, relativistic 
electron beam diode, non-neutral 
plasma instabilities and collective 
ion accelerations. 

Financial Assistance 

Financial aid is available to graduate 
students in the form of Graduate 
Research Assistantships, Graduate 
Teaching Assistantships and 
Fellowships. Applications for 
Graduate Research and Teaching 
Assistantships should be completed 
and sent to the Electrical Engineer- 
ing Office of Graduate Studies. 

Graduate Research Assistant- 
ships are awarded subject to 
availability of funds and are renewed 
subject to satisfactory research 
progress. Summer appointments are 
often available. 

Graduate Teaching Assistantships 
are usually awarded in April. 
Preference is given to United States 
citizens. Duties may include 
laboratory teaching assignments, 
assistance in the computation facili- 



ty, or assistance in courses. 
Teaching Assistants must register 
for at least nine credit hiours per 
semester. 

Local industries and government 
agencies have work-study programs 
in which about half of the Electrical 
Engineering graduate student body 
participates. Application should be 
made directly to the agencies. 

Additional Information 

Special brochures or publications of- 
fered by the Department may be ob- 
tained by writing to this address: 
Electrical Engineering Office of 
Graduate Studies, University of 

Courses 

ENEE 402 Advanced Pulse Techniques. 

(3) (See ENEE 403 for optional related 
laboratory course). Prerequisite, ENEE 
314 or 410 or equivalent. Bistable, 
n-ionostable, and astable circuits, sweep 
circuits, synchronization, counting, 
gates, comparators. Magnetic core cir- 
cuits, semi-conductor and vacuum-tube 
circuits. 

ENEE 403 Pulse Techniques Laboratory. 

(1) Two hours of laboratory per week. 
Corequisite: ENEE 402 and permission of 
the instructor. Experiments on switching 
circuits, bistable, monostable, and 
astable circuits, sweep circuits, gates, 
comparators. 

ENEE 404 Radio Engineering. (3) Prereq- 
uisite: ENEE 314. Tuned circuit 
amplifiers, single, double, and stagger 
tuned circuits: class c amplifiers; fre- 
quency multipliers; amplitude modula- 
tion; modulators and detectors; receiver 
design and characteristics; frequency 
modulation; FM transmitters and 
receivers. 

ENEE 405 Advanced Radio Engineering 
Laboratory. (1) Two hours of laboratory 
per week. Corequisite: ENEE 404. Ex- 
periments on multiple tuned amplifiers, 
noise figure measurements, class-c 
amplifiers, varactors, modulators, proj- 
ects. 

ENEE 406 Mathematical Foundations of 
Circuit Theory. (3) Prerequisites: ENEE 
304 and MATH 241, or equivalent. Review 
ot determinants, linear equations, matrix 
theory, eigenvalues, theory of complex 
variables, inverse La Place 
transforms. Applications are drawn 
primarily from circuit analysis. 

ENEE 407 Microwave-Circuits 
Laboratory. (2) Prerequisite, senior stand- 
ing in electrical engineering or consent 
of instructor. One lecture and three lab 
hours per week. Experiments concerned 
with circuits constructed from 
microwave components providing prac- 
tical experience in the design, construc- 
tion and testing of such circuits. Projects 
include microwave filters and 
s-parameter design with applications of 
current technology. 



ENEE 410 Electronic Circuits. (3) Prereq- 
uisite, ENEE 300 or equivalent 
knowledge of circuit theory or consent of 
the instructor. This course is intended 
for students in the physical sciences, 
and for engineering students requiring 
additional study of electron circuits. 
Credit not normally given for this course 
in an electrical engineering major pro- 
gram. (ENEE 413 may optionally be taken 
as an associated laboratory). P-N junc- 
tions, transistors, vacuum tubes, biasing 
and operating point stability, switches, 
large-signal analysis, models, small- 
signal analysis, frequency response, 
feedback and multistage amplifiers, 
pulse and digital circuits. 

ENEE 412 Telemetry Systems. (3) Prereq- 
uisite: ENEE 314. Selected digital cir- 
cuits: frequency division multiplexing; 
fm/am systems, SS3/fm systems; time 
division multiplexed systems; pulse 
amplitude modulation; pulse duration 
modulation; pulse code modulation; an- 
alog to digital converters; multiplex- 
ers and dc-commutators. 

ENEE 413 Electronics Laboratory. (2) Co 
requisite, ENEE 314. One lecture and 
three lab hours per week. Provides ex- 
perience in the specification, design, and 
testing of basic electronic circuits and 
practical interconnections. Emphasis on 
design with discrete solid state and in- 
tegrated circuit components for both 
analog and pulse circuits. 

ENEE 414 Network Analysis. (3) Prereq- 
uisite: ENEE 304. Network properties: 
linearity, reciprocity, etc.; 2-port descrip- 
tions and generalization: Y, S, hybrid 
matrices; description properties: sym- 
metry, para-unity, etc.; basic topological 
analysis; state-space techniques; 
computer-aided analysis; sensitivity 
analysis; approximation theory. 

ENEE 416 Network Synthesis. (3) Prereq- 
uisite — ENEE 304. Active and passive 
components, passivity, bounded and 
positive real, RC properties and syn- 
thesis, Brune and Darlington synthesis, 
transfer-voltage and Y21 synthesis, ac- 
tive feedback configurations, image 
parameter design, computer-aided op- 
timization synthesis via the embedding 
concept. 

ENEE 417 Advanced Network Theory. (3) 

Corequisite, ENEE 414 (or consent of in- 
structor). A study of network descrip- 
tions for analysis and basic active syn- 
thesis. Indefinite and topological for- 
mulations, n-port structures and inter- 
connections, active components and 
descriptions, synthesis using controlled 
sources, synthesis and analysis via state 
characterizations. Additional topics from 
non-linear, distributed parameter, and 
digital filters. 

ENEE 418 Projects in Electrical Engineer- 
ing. (1-3) Hours to be arranged. Prereq- 
uisites, senior standing and permission 
of the instructor. May be taken for 
repeated credit up to a total of 4 credits, 
with the permission of the student's ad- 
visor and the instructor. Theoretical and 
experimental projects. 



ENEE 419 Apprenticeship in Electrical 
Engineering. (2-3) Hours to be arranged. 
Prerequisite: completion of sophomore 
courses and permission of an apprentice- 
ship director. May be taken for repeated 
credit up to a total of nine credits. A 
unique opportunity for experience in ex- 
perimental research and engineering 
design. A few highly qualified students 
will be selected as apprentices in one of 
the research facilities of the electrical 
engineering department and will par- 
ticipate in the current research under the 
supervision of the laboratory director. In 
the past, apprenticeships have been 
available in the following laboratories: 
biomedical, electron ring accelerator, gas 
laser, integrated circuits, simulation and 
computer, and solid state laser. 

ENEE 420 Communication Theory. (3) 

Prerequisite, ENEE 324. Random signals: 
elements of random processes, noise, 
Gaussian process, correlation functions 
and power spectra, linear operations; op- 
timum receivers, vector waveform chan- 
nels, receiver implementation, probability 
of error performance; efficient signaling; 
sources, encoding, dimensionality, chan- 
nel capacity; wave form communication: 
linear, angle, and pulse modulation. 

ENEE 421 Introduction to Information 
Theory. (3) Prerequisite, ENEE 324. 
Definition of information and entropy; 
characterization of sources; Kraft and 
Macmilian inequalities; coding informa- 
tion sources; noiseless coding theorem; 
channels and mutual information; 
Shannon's coding theorem for noisy 
channels. 

ENEE 425 Signal Analysis, Modulation 
and Noise. (3) Prerequisites: ENEE 314 
and ENEE 324. Signal transmission 
through networks, transmission in the 
presence of noise, statistical methods of 
determining error and transmission ef- 
fects, modulation schemes. 

ENEE 432 Electronics for Life Scientists. 

(4) Three hours of lecture and two hours 
of laboratory per week. Prerequisites, 
college algebra and a physics course, in- 
cluding basic electricity and magnetism. 
Not accepted for credit in an electrical 
engineering major program. The concept 
of an instrumentation system with em- 
phasis upon requirements for 
transducers, amplifiers, and recording 
devices, design criteria and circuitry of 
power supplies amplifiers, and pulse 
equipment, specific instruments used for 
biological research, problems of 
shielding against hum and noise pickup 
and other interference problems 
characteristic of biological systems. 

ENEE 433 Electronic Instrumentation for 
Physical Science. (3) Two hours of lec- 
ture and two hours of laboratory per 
week. Prerequisites, ENEE 300 or 306, 
PHYS 271 or equivalent, or consent of in- 
structor. The concept of instrumentation 
systems from sensor to readout; discus- 
sions of transducers, system dynamics, 
precision and accuracy; measurement of 
electrical parameters; direct, differential, 
and potentiometric measurements; 
bridge measurements, time and frequen- 

Graduate Programs / 97 



cy measurements, waveform generation 
and display. 

ENEE 434 Introduction to Neural Net- 
works and Signals. (3) Prerequisite, ENEE 
204 or 300. Introduction in ttie generation 
and processing of bioelectric signals in- 
cluding structure and function of the 
neuron, membrane ttieory, generation 
and propagation of nerve impulses, 
synaptic mechanisms, transduction and 
neural coding of sensory events, central 
nervous system processing of sensory 
information and correlated electrical 
signals, control of effector organs, mus- 
cle contraction and mechanics, and 
models of neurons and neural networks. 

ENEE 435 Electrodes and Electrical Pro- 
cesses in Biology and Medicine. (3) 

Prerequisites, ENEE 204 or 300. Tech- 
niques for recording biological signals 
such as brain, muscle and cardial elec- 
trical potentials; membrane theory; half- 
cell potentials, liquid junction potentials, 
polarization of electrodes; biological and 
medical instrumentation; and applica- 
tions in the design of cardial 
pacemakers, or a similar case study. 

ENEE 438 Topics in Biomedical 
Engineering. (1-3) Prerequisite, permis- 
sion of the instructor. May be taken for 
repeated credit. The content may vary 
from semester to semester. Selected 
topics of current interest from such 
areas as bioelectric systems, modeling 
instrumentation, automated diagnostic, 
health-care delivery, etc. Repeatable to a 
maximum of 9 hours. 

ENEE 442 Software Engineering. (3) Pre- 
requisites: ENES 240; ENEE 250 or 
equivalent. Architectural aspects of soft- 
ware engineering. Machine language and 
machine structure; assembly language 
and assemblers; macro-language and 
macro-processors; loaders and linkers; 
programming languages and language 
structure; compilers and interpreters; 
operating systems. 

ENEE 443 Introduction to Computers and 
Computation. (3) Prerequisite, ENES 240 
or equivalent. Basic structure and 
organization of digital systems; represen- 
tation of data, introduction to software 
systems; assembly language; application 
of computers in engineering and physical 
systems. Not open for students who 
have credit in ENEE 250. 

ENEE 444 Logic Design of Digital 
Systems. (3) Prerequisite, ENEE 250. 
Review of switching algebra; gates and 
logic modules; map simplification tech- 
niques; multiple-output systems; 
memory elements and sequential 
systems; large switching systems; 
Iterative networks; sample designs, com- 
puter oriented simplification algorithms; 
state assignment; partition techniques; 
sequential system decompositions. 

ENEE 445 Computer Laboratory. (2) Pre- 
requisite, ENEE 444. One lecture and 
three lab hours per week. Hardware 
oriented experiments providing practical 
experience in the design, construction, 
and checkout of components and inter- 
faces for digital computers and data 

98 / Graduate Programs 



transmission systems. Projects include 
classical design techniques and applica- 
tions of current technology. 

ENEE 446 Digital Computer Design. (3) 

Prerequisite: ENEE 250. Essential 
elements of the hardware design of 
digital computers. Arithmetic and logic 
units, adders, multipliers, dividers, logic 
and shifting operations, floating point 
arithmetic. Memory organization, design 
of a basic computer; instruction set, bus 
structure, fetch-execute microoperations, 
hard-wired control unit, micro- 
programmed control unit, index 
registers, indirect addressing, interrupt 
operation, direct memory access. 
Organization of commercially available 
computers. No student will tje allowed 
credit for both CMSC 410 and ENEE 446. 

ENEE 450 Discrete Structures. (3) Prereq- 
uisite: ENES 240 or equivalent. Review of 
set algebra including relations, partial 
ordering and mappings. Algebraic struc- 
tures including semigroups, and groups. 
Graph theory including trees and 
weighted graphs. Boolean algebra and 
prospositional logic. Applications of 
these structures to various areas of com- 
puter engineering. 

ENEE 456 Analog and Hybrid Computers. 

(3) Prerequisite, ENEE 314. Programming 
the analog computer; analog computing 
components; error analysis, repetitive 
operation; synthesis of systems using 
the computer; hybrid computer systems. 

ENEE 460 Control Systems. (3) Prereq- 
uisite, ENEE 322. Review of transform 
analysis and linear algebra, mathematical 
models for control system components, 
transient response design, error analysis 
and design, root locus, frequency 
response, system design and compensa- 
tion. 

ENEE 461 Control Systems Laboratory. 
(2) Prerequisite, ENEE 460. One lecture 
and three lab hours per week. Projects to 
enhance the student's understanding of 
feedback control systems and to 
familiarize him with the characteristics 
and limitations of real control devices. 
Students will design, build, and test ser- 
vomechanisms, and will conduct analog 
and hybrid computer simulations of con- 
trol systems. 

ENEE 462 Systems, Control and Com- 
putation. (3) Prerequisites, ENEE 300 or 
304, and MATH 246 or consent of instruc- 
tor. Matrix algebra, state space analysis 
of discrete systems, state space analysis 
of continuous systems, computer 
algorithms for circuit analysis, optimiza- 
tion and system simulation. 

ENEE 464 Linear System Theory. (3) 

Prerequisite, ENEE 322. An introduction 
to the state space theory of linear 
engineering systems; state variables, 
matrix exponential and impulse 
response. Linear sampled-data systems, 
discrete systems. Reliability, stability 
and equivalence. Relation to Laplace 
transform. Application to circuits, con- 
trols, communications and computers. 

ENEE 472 Transducers and Electrical 
Machinery. (3) Prerequisite, ENEE 304. 



Electromechanical transducers, theory of 
electromechanical systems, power and 
wideband transformers, rotating elec- 
trical machinery from the theoretical and 
performance points of view. 

ENEE 473 Transducers and Electrical 
Machinery Laboratory. (1) Corequisite, 
ENEE 472. Experiments on transformers, 
synchronous machines, induction 
motors, synchros, loudspeakers, other 
transducers. 

ENEE 480 Fundamentals of Solid State 
Electronics. (3) Prerequisite, ENEE 381. 
Review of Maxwell's equation, electro- 
magnetic properties of dielectrics; in- 
troduction to quantum mechanics and 
quantum statistics; classical and quan- 
tum theory of metals; theory of semi- 
conductors and semiconductor devices; 
principle of magnetic devices and 
selected topics. 

ENEE 481 Antennas. (3) Prerequisite, 
ENEE 381. Introduction to the concepts 
of radiation, generalized far field for- 
mulas; antenna theorems and fundamen- 
tals; antenna arrays, linear and planar ar- 
rays; aperture antennas; terminal im- 
pedance; propagation. 

ENEE 483 Electromagnetic 
Measurements Laboratory. (2) Prereq- 
uisites, ENEE 305 and ENEE 380. One 
lecture and three lab hours per week. Ex- 
periments designed to provide familiarity 
with a large class of micro-wave and op- 
tical components, techniques for inter- 
connecting them into useful systems, 
and techniques of high frequency and 
optical measurements. 

ENEE 487 Particle Accelerators, Physical 
and Engineering Principles. (3) Prereq- 
uisites: ENEE 380 and PHYS 420, or con- 
sent of the instructor. Sources of 
charged particles; methods of accelera- 
tion and focusing of ion beams in elec- 
tromagnetic fields; basic theory, design, 
and engineering principles of particle ac- 
celerators. 

ENEE 488 Topics in Electrical Engineer- 
ing. (3) Prerequisite, permission of the in- 
structor. May be taken for repeated 
credit up to a total of six credits, with the 
permission of the student's advisor and 
the instructor. 

ENEE 496 Lasers and Electro-Optic 
Devices. (3) Pre- or corequisite: ENEE 
381. Optical resonators, Fabry-Perot 
etalon. Theory of laser oscillation, rate 
equations. Gaseous, solid state, 
semiconductor and dye laser systems. 
Electro-optic effects and parametric 
oscillators. Holography. 

ENEE 601 Active Network Analysis. (3) 

Prerequisite, ENEE 406 or equivalent. 
The complex frequency plane, conven- 
tional feedback and sensitivity, theorems 
for feedback circuits, stability and 
physical reliability of electrical networks, 
Nyquist's and Routh's criteria for stabili- 
ty, activity and passivity criteria. 

ENEE 602 Transients In Linear Systems. 

(3) Prerequisite, undergraduate major in 
electrical or mechanical engineering or 
physics. Operational circuit analysis, the 



Fourier integral, transient analysis of 
electrical and mechanical systenns and 
electronic circuits by the La Place 
transform method. 

ENEE 603 Transients in Linear Systems. 

(3) Prerequisite, undergraduate major in 
electrical or mechanical engineering or 
physics. Continuation of ENEE 602. 

ENEE 604. Advanced Electronic Circuit 
Design. (3) Prerequisite, ENEE 312 or 
consent of the instructor. Comparison of 
bipolar and field effect transistors, de- 
tailed frequency response of single and 
multistage amplifiers, design of feedback 
amplifiers, D-C coupling techniques, 
design of multistage tuned amplifiers. 

ENEE 605 Graph Ttieory and Network 
Analysis. (3) Prerequisite, ENEE 600. 
Linear graph theory as applied to elec- 
trical networks, cut sets and tie sets, in- 
cidence matrices, trees, branches and 
mazes, development of network equa- 
tions by matrix and index notation, net- 
work characteristic equations for natural 
circuit behavior, signal-flow-graph theory 
and Mason-S rule, stability of active two- 
part networks. 

ENEE 608 Graduate Seminar. (1-3) Prereq- 
uisite, consent of instructor. Every 
semester regular seminars are held in 
electrical science and in the six areas of 
specialization offered by the electrical 
engineering department. They may be 
taken, by arrangement with the student's 
advisor, for repeated credit. 

ENEE 609 Projects in Electrical Engineer- 
ing. (1-3) Prerequisite: consent of the in- 
structor. Individual projects on advanced 
systems in electrical engineering. May be 
repeated for credit up to a maximum of 
three credits. 

ENEE 610 Electrical Network Theory. (3) 

Undergraduate circuit theory or consent 
of the instructor. f\/latrix algebra, network 
elements, ports, passivity and activity, 
geometrical and analytical descriptions 
of networks, state variable characteriza- 
tions, scattering matrices, signal flow 
graphs, sensitivity. 

ENEE 620 Random Processes in Com- 
munication and Control. (3) Prerequisite: 
ENEE 324 or equivalent. Introduction to 
random processes: characterization, 
classification, representation; Gaussian 
and other examples. Linear operations 
on random processes, stationary pro- 
cesses: covariance function and spectral 
density. Linear least-square waveform 
estimation; Wiener-Kolmogoroff filtering, 
Kalman-Bucy recursive filtering; function 
space characterization, non-linear opera- 
tions on random processes. 

ENEE 621 Estimation and Detection 
Theory. (3) Prerequisite: ENEE 620 or 
equivalent or consent of instructor. 
Estimation of unknown parameters, 
Cramer-Rao lower bound; optimum (map) 
demodulation; filtering, amplitude and 
angle modulation, comparison with con- 
ventional systems; statistical decision 
theory Bayes, Minimax, Neyman/Pear- 
son, Criteria-68 simple and composite 
hypotheses; application to coherent and 



incoherent signal detection; M-Ary 
hypothesis; application to uncoded and 
coded digital communication systems. 
(Listed also as MAPL644.) 

ENEE 630 Advanced Topics — Radar 
Signals and Systems. (3) Corequisite, 
ENEE 620. Review of linear systems and 
signals: Fourier transform representation 
time — bandwidth product, resolution, 
complex representation; maximum 
signal-to-noise ratio criterion receiver 
and signal design, radar range equation; 
statistical detection theory: probability of 
error performance; statistical estimation 
theory: unknown parameters, Range- 
Doppler radar, ambiguity problem, 
asymptotic maximum likelihood estima- 
tion and Cramer-Rao lower bound; 
resolution of multiple objects. 

ENEE 633. Modeling of Nerves and 
Muscles With Applications to Prosthetic 
Devices. (3) Prerequisite: undergraduate 
degree in engineering or physics, or per- 
mission of the instructor. Principles and 
circuit models for resting and active 
membrane potentials of nerves and 
muscles; synaptic mechanisms including 
probabilistic models of neuromuscular 
transmission; electrode potentials and 
reactions; propagation of biopotentials in 
a volume conductor; properties, 
mechanical models, and circuit analogs 
for muscles and proprioceptors; spinal 
reflexes in the control of posture; ap- 
plications of the above in the design of 
prosthetic and orthotic devices. 

ENEE 634 Models of Transduction and 
Signal Processing in Sensory Systems. 

(3) Prerequisite, ENEE 633 or ENEE 435 
or permission of the instructor. General 
organization of sensory systems; recep- 
tor mechanisms; receptor and neural 
models; statistics of neural spike trains; 
peripheral signal processing in sensory 
systems, with emphasis on vision and 
audition; introduction to signal process- 
ing in the central nervous system; ap- 
plications to development of sensory 
protheses. 

ENEE 640 Arithmetic and Coding 
Aspects of Digital Computers. (3) Prereq- 
uisite, ENEE 440 or 446 or permission of 
the instructor. Digital logic design 
aspects; sequential circuits; computer 
number systems; arithmetic codes for er- 
ror corrrection; residue number theory; 
arithmetic units design; fault detection 
and correction circuits. 

ENEE 642 Software System Implementa- 
tion. (3) Prerequisite: ENEE 442 or 
equivalent. Implementation aspects of 
software engineering. Programming 
languages; architectural design; program 
design; structured programming; 
peripheral storage devices; 1/0 program- 
ming; debugging and evaluation. 

ENEE 646 Digital Computer Design. (3) 

Prerequisite, ENEE 446. Introduction to 
design techniques for digital computers; 
digital arithmetic; logic circuits; digital 
memories; design of computer elements; 
arithemetic unit; and control unit. A sim- 
ple digital computer will be designed. 



ENEE 648 Advanced Topics in Electrical 
Engineering. (3) Every semester courses 
intended for high degree of specializa- 
tion are offered by visiting or regular 
electrical engineering faculty members in 
two or more of the areas listed in 488. 
The student should check with the elec- 
trical engineering office of graduate 
studies for a list and the description of 
the topics offered currently. 

ENEE 651 Coding Theory and Applica- 
tions. (3) Prerequisite, ENEE 450 and 
some knowledge of logic of switching 
systems. Introduction to coding and brief 
review of modern algebra; theory of 
linear codes; decoding; hamming, cyclic, 
and Bose-Chaudhuri codes; error- 
checking codes for arithmetic; an -I- B 
type codes; residue checks; practical self 
checking arithmetic units; simple 
automatic fault diagnosing techniques. 

ENEE 652 Automata Theory. (3) Prereq- 
uisite, ENEE 421 or CMSC 640. This is 
the same course as CMSC 740. Introduc- 
tion to the theory of abstract 
mathematical machines; structural and 
behavioral classification of automata; 
finite-state automata; theory of regular 
sets; pushdown automata; linear- 
bounded automata; finite transducers; 
turing machines; universal turing 
machines. 

ENEE 654 Combinatorial Switching 
Theory. (3) Prerequisites, ENEE 450 and 
ENEE 444. Application of algebraic 
techniques to combinatorial switching 
networks; multi-valued systems; sym- 
metries and their use; optimization 
algorithms; heuristic techniques; majori- 
ty and threshold logic; function decom- 
position; cellular cascades. 

ENEE 655 Structure Theory of Machines. 

(3) Prerequisites, ENEE 450 and ENEE 
444. Machine realizations; partitions and 
the substitution property; pair algebras 
and applications; variable dependence; 
decomposition; loop-free structures; set 
system decompositions; semigroup 
realizations. 

ENEE 657 Simulation of Dynamic 
Systems. (3) Prerequisite, ENEE 443. 
Mechanistic methods for differential 
equation solution; application of analog 
or hybrid computers and digital differen- 
tial analyzers for that purpose; design 
and structure of languages for digital- 
analog simulation on a general purpose 
digital computer; mimic language and ex- 
amples of its use. Class will run simula- 
tion programs on a large-scale computer. 

ENEE 660 Control System Analysis and 
Synthesis. (3) Prerequisite, under- 
graduate automatic control theory 
background or consent of instructor. The 
linear regulator problem (finite and in- 
finite time), optimal regulation with a 
prescribed degree of stability, relation of 
the optimal regulator to classical control 
specifications, sensitivity of optimal 
regulators, state estimators and their use 
in system design, optimal regulators with 
input disturbances, tracking systems. 
Course includes a brief review of 
classical design techniques, signal flow 

Graduate Programs / 99 



graphs, error coefficients and an intro- 
duction to sample-data systems. 

ENEE 661 NonLinearand Adaptive Con- 
trol Systems. (3) Prerequisite, under- 
graduate background in linear control 
ttieory or consent of instructor. Brief 
review of the state space, state plane 
and phase plane, linearization and stabili- 
ty in the small, equivalent linearization 
and the describing function, systems 
with stochastic inputs, exact methods of 
analysis, stability in the large and the se- 
cond method of Lyaponov. frequency do- 
main stability criteria, Povo's method and 
its extensions, introduction to optimum 
switched systems, stability of systems 
with input. 

ENEE 662 Sampled-Data Control 
Systems. (3) Prerequisite, preparations in 
linear feedback control theory or consent 
of instructor. Z-transform and modified 
Z-transform method of analysis, root 
locus and frequency response methods 
of analysis, ideal and finite width sam 
pling, discrete and continuous compen- 
sation of digital control systems, state 
space equations, controllability and 
observability of discrete systems, stabili- 
ty, minimum time and minimum energy 
control, statistical design and the 
discrete Kalman filter. 

ENEE 663 System Theory. (3) Modelling 
of systems, abstract definition of state, 
linearity and its implications, linear dif- 
ferential systems, controllability and 
observability, impulse response, transfer 
functions, realization nonlinear differen- 
tial systems, definitions of stability, 
Lyapunov stability theory, input/output 
stability, frequency domain stability con- 
ditions. (Listed also as MAPL 640.) 

ENEE 664 Optimization and Control. (3) 

Prerequisite, ENEE 760. Calculus of 
variations, direct methods of optimiza- 
tion, Euler-Lagrange equations, inequali- 
ty constraint, maximum principle, 
Hamilton-Jacobi theory, dynamic pro- 
gramming, adaptive and stochastic con- 
trol, filtering theory. 

ENEE 665 Linear System Identification. 

(3) Prerequisites — MATH 400 and ENEE 
322 or equivalent ENEE 620. Representa- 
tions for linear systems. Parameter 
estimation techniques such as least 
square and maximum likelihood. Correla- 
tion methods with white noise inputs. 
Stochastic approximation and gradient 
algorithms. Applications of 
quarilinearization and invariant imbed- 
ding. Effect of abreviation noise. 

ENEE 680 Electromagnetic Theory I. (3) 

Prerequisite, ENEE 381 or equivalent. 
Theoretical analysis and engineering ap- 
plications of Maxwell's equations. Boun- 
dary value problems of electrostatics and 
magnetostatics. 

ENEE 681 Electromagnetic Theory II. (3) 

Prerequisite, ENEE 381 or equivalent. 
Continuation of ENEE 680. Theoretical 
analysis and engineering applications of 
Maxwell's equations. The homogeneous 
wave equation. Plane wave propagation. 
The interaction of plane waves and 
material media. Retarded potentials. 

100 / Graduate Programs 



The Hertz potential. Simple radiating 
systems. Relativisitic covariance of Max- 
well's equations. 

ENEE 683 Mathematics for Elec- 
tromagnetlsm. (3) Prerequisite, 
undergraduate preparation in elec- 
tromagnetic theory and advanced 
calculus. Tensors and curvilinear coor- 
dinates, partial differential equations of 
electrostatics and electrodynamics, tunc- 
tionals, integral equations, and calculus 
of variations as applied to elec- 
tromagnetism. 

ENEE 686 Charged Particle Dynamics, 
Electron and Ion Beams. (3) Three hours 
per week. Prerequisite, consent of in- 
structor. General principles of single- 
particle dynamics: mapping of the elec- 
tric and magnetic fields; equation of mo- 
tion and methods of solution; production 
and control of charge particle beams; 
electron optics: Liouville's theorem; 
space charge effects in high current 
beams; design principles of special elec- 
tron and ion beam devices. 

ENEE 690 Quantum and Wave 
Phenomena with Electrical Application. 

(3) Two lectures per week. Prerequisite, 
ENEE 381 and ENEE 382 or equivalent. 
Introduction of quantum and wave 
phenomena from electrical engineering 
point of view. Topics included: general 
principles of quantum mechanics, 
operator algebra, the microwave reso- 
nant cavity and the analagous potential 
well problem, harmonic oscillator, 
hydrogenic atom. Perturbation method 
applied to the transmission line and 
potential well problems. Periodically 
loaded transmission line and Kronig- 
Penny model of band theory. 

ENEE 696 Integrated and Microwave 
Electronics. (3) Prerequisite, ENEE 310. 
Registration in ENEE 793 recommended. 
Active and passive elements used in 
semiconductor structures. Design ap- 
plication of linear and digital integrated 
circuits. 

ENEE 697 Semiconductor Devices and 
Technology. (3) Prerequisite ENEE 496 or 
equivalent. Registration in ENEE 793 
recommended. The principles, structures 
and characteristics of semiconductor 
devices. Technology and fabrication of 
semiconductor devices. 

ENEE 700 Network Synthesis. (3) Prereq- 
uisite, ENEE 605 or equivalent. Design of 
driving-point and transfer impedance 
functions with emphasis of the transfer 
loss and phase of minimum-phase net- 
works, flow diagrams, physical network 
characteristics, including relations ex- 
isting between the real and imaginary 
components of network functions, 
modern methods of network synthesis. 

ENEE 701 Network Synthesis. (3) Prereq- 
uisite, ENEE 700 or equivalent. Design of 
driving-point and transfer impedance 
functions with emphasis of the transfer 
loss and phase of minimum-phase net- 
works, flow diagrams, physical network 
characteristics, including relations ex- 
isting between the real and imaginary 



components of network functions, 
modern methods of network synthesis. 

ENEE 703 Semiconductor Device 
Models. (3) Prerequisite. ENEE 605 or 
equivalents. Single-frequency models for 
transistors; small-signal and wide-band 
models for general non-reciprocal 
devices, hybrid-pi and tee models for 
transistors; relationship of models to 
transistor physics; synthesis of wide- 
band models from terminal behavior, 
computer utilization of models for other 
semiconductor devices. 

ENEE 707 Applications of Tensor 
Analysis. (3) Prerequisite, ENEE 600 or 
602. The mathematical background of 
tensor notation, which is applicable to 
electrical enginsering problems. Applica- 
tions of tensor analysis to electrical cir- 
cuit theory and to field theory. 

ENEE 721 Information Theory. (3) Co- 
requisite: ENEE 620. Prerequisite: STAT 
400 or equivalent. Information measure, 
entropy, mutual information; source en- 
coding; noiseless coding theorem, noisy 
coding theorem: exponential error 
bounds; introduction to probabilistic er- 
ror correcting codes, block and convolu- 
tional codes and error bounds: channels 
with memory; continuous channels; rate 
distortion (unction. (Same as MAPL 731.) 

ENEE 722 Coding Theory. (3) Prereq- 
uisite: ENEE 721/MAPL 731. Algebraic 
burst and random error correcting codes, 
convolutional encoding and sequential 
decoding, threshold decoding, con- 
catenated codes, P-N sequences, 
arithemetic codes. (Same as MAPL 732.) 

ENEE 724 Digital Signal Processing. (3) 

Prerequisite, ENEE 620 or consent of in- 
structor. Review of Z transforms; correla- 
tion functions and power spectral den- 
sities for discrete time stochastic pro- 
cesses: discrete time Wiener filters; 
methods for designing digital filters to 
meet precise frequency domain 
specification; effects of truncation, 
round-off and finite word length 
arithmetic on the accuracy and stability 
of digital filters; adaptive equalizers (or 
narrow band data channels; discrete 
Fourier transform and fast Fourier 
transform; homomorphic filtering: Gauss- 
Markov estimates; spectral density 
estimation. 

ENEE 728 Advanced Topics in Com- 
munication Theory. (3) Topics selected, 
as announced, from advanced com- 
munication theory and its applications. 

ENEE 730 Advanced Topics — Radar 
Signals and Systems. (3) Prerequisite, 
ENEE 620 or equivalent. The theory of 
imaging radar systems. Classifications, 
resolution mechanisms, and principles. 
System design for additive noise: effects 
of ambiguity, multiplicative noise, motion 
errors, nonlinearities, and scattering 
mechanism. System design for ambiguity 
and multiplicative noise. Optical process- 
ing. Application to synthetic aperture, 
astronomical, and hologram radar. 

ENEE 733 Neural Control of Animal 
HAovemenf. (3) Prerequisite: ENEE 633 or 
634. Properties of muscles, propriocep- 



tors, reflexes, and central nervous 
system structures; linear and nonlinear 
models; field potential analysis and 
theories of cerebellar function; and ttie 
control and coordination of these struc- 
tures during voluntary and involuntary 
movement in animals. 

ENEE 746 Digital Systems Engineering. 

(3) Prerequisite, ENEE 646. Systems 
aspects of digital-computer-based 
systems; data flow analysis: system 
organization; control languages; con- 
soles and displays; remote terminals; 
software-hardware tradeoff; system 
evaluation; case studies from selected 
applications areas such as data acquisi- 
tion and reduction information storage, 
or the like. 

ENEE 748 Topics in Computer Design. 
(1-3) Prerequisite, permission of the in- 
structor. Such topics as computer 
arithmetic, computer reliability, and 
threshold logic will be considered. May 
be taken for repeated credit. 

ENEE 760 Mathematics of Optimization. 

(3) Prerequisite, course in advanced 
calculous or real analysis. Introduction to 
functional analysis with emphasis on ap- 
plications to system theory and optimiza- 
tion. Topics covered are linear spaces 
and operators, Hilbert and Banach 
spaces. Baire category theorem, Hahn- 
Banach Theorem, principle of uniform 
boundedness, duality. 

ENEE 761 Control of Distributed 
Parameter Systems. (3) Prerequisite; an 
introductory course in functional analytic 
methods at the level of ENEE 760, and 
background in control and system 
theory. Study of systems governed by 
paritial differential equations. Delay 
systems. Boundary and distributed con- 
trol, Lyapunov stability. Optimal control 
of systems governed by paritial differen- 
tial equations and of delay systems. Ap- 
plications to continuum mechanics, 
distributed networks, biology, 
economics, and engineering. (Same as 
MAPL741.) 

ENEE 762 Stochastic Control. (3) Prereq- 
uisites: ENEE 620 or equivalent: and 
ENEE 663/MAPL 640; or consent of the 
instructor. Stochastic control systems, 
numerical methods for the Ricatti equa- 
tion, the separation principle, control of 
linear systems with Gaussian signals and 
quadratic cost, nonlinear stochastic con- 
trol, stochastic stability, introduction to 
stochastic games. (Same as MAPL 742.) 

ENEE 769 Advanced Topics in Control 
Theory. (3) Topics selected, as an- 
nounced, from advanced control theory 
and its applications. 

ENEE 772 Mathematical Models in 
Estimation Theory. (3) Prerequisite: 
background in functional analysis, real 
analysis and random processes. Abstract 
measures, probability measures on func- 
tional spaces, integration; Markov pro- 
cesses, stochastic differential equations, 
ITO's rule; Kalman-Bucy model; duality of 
estimation and control, singular detec- 
tion, point processes; RKHS, linear 
theory, multiplicity representations; addi- 



tional models and applications. (Same as 
MAPL 735.) 

ENEE 774 Mathematics of Continuous 
Networks. (3) Nonoriented systems, 
ports, linear orientations, theory of distri- 
butions, scattering matrices, operatory 
theory of networks, activity, invariant 
embedding, multivariable PR and BR 
state-determined systems, synthesis, in- 
terval functions, tolerance analysis, 
neuron networks and models, N/lanley- 
Rowe relations. Oscillators and nonlinear 
subharmonic generation. 

ENEE 780 Microwave Engineering. (3) 

Prerequisite, ENEE 681. Mathematical 
methods for the solution of the wave 
equation, transmission lines and wave- 
guide structures, surface guides and ar- 
tifical dielectrics. 

ENEE 781 Optical Engineering. (3) 

Fourier analysis in two dimensions, dif- 
fraction theory, optical imaging systems, 
spatial filtering, holography. 

ENEE 782 Radio Wave Propagation. (3) 

Two lectures per week. Prerequisite, 
ENEE 681. General solutions of Max- 
well's equations, geometrical optics ap- 
proximations, propagation above a plane 
earth, effects of surface irregularities 
and stratified atmospheres, scattering by 
turbulence. 

ENEE 783 Radio Wave Propagation. (3) 

Two lectures per week. Prerequisite 
ENEE 782. Continuation of ENEE 782. 

ENEE 784 Antenna Theory. (3) Two lec- 
tures per week. Prerequisite, ENEE 681 
or equivalent. Review of Maxwell's equa- 
tions: radiative networks; linear anten- 
nas; antenna arrays; aperture antennas; 
advanced topics. 

ENEE 790 Quantum Electronics I. (3) Two 

lectures per week. Prerequisite: a 
knowledge of quantum mechanics and 
electromagnetic theory. Spontaneous 
emission, interaction of radiation and 
matter, masers, optical resonators, the 
gas, solid and semi-conductor lasers, 
electro-optical effect, propagation in 
anisotropic media and light modulation. 

ENEE 791 Quantum Electronics II. (3) 

Nonlinear optical effects and devices, 
tunable coherent light sources — optical 
parametric oscillator, frequency conver- 
sion and dye laser. Ultrashort pulse 
generation and measurement, stimulated 
Raman effect, and applications, interac- 
tion of acoustic and optical waves, and 
holography. 

ENEE 793 Solid State Electronics. (3) 

Prerequisite, a graduate course in quan- 
tum mechanics or consent of instructor. 
Properties of crystals; energy bands: 
electron transport theory: conductivity 
and Hall effect: statistical distributions: 
Fermi level: impurities; non-equilibrium 
carrier distributions: normal modes of 
vibration: effects of high electric fields: 
P-N junction theory, avalanche 
breakdown; tunneling phenomena: sur- 
face properties. 

ENEE 799 Master's Thesis Research. (1-6) 



ENEE 899 Doctoral Dissertation Re- 
search. (1-8) 

Engineering Materials 
Program 

Professor and Director: Spain' 

Professors: Arsenault' 

Assistant Professors: Mathers 

Associate Faculty: Marcinkowski^ Park' 

'joint appointment with Chemical 

Engineering 

'joint appointment with Mechanical 

Engineering 

'joint appointment with Physics 

The Engineering Materials program 
is interdisciplinary between 
Chemical and Mechanical Engineer- 
ing. Special areas of concentration 
include diffraction, dislocation and 
mechanical behavior of materials, 
x-ray and electron microscopic tech- 
niques, electronic and magnetic 
behavior of materials, and the 
chemical physics of materials. 

Admission and Degree Information 

The programs leading to the M.S. 
and Ph.D. degrees are open to 
qualified students holding the B.S. 
degree. Admission may be granted 
to students with degrees in any of 
the engineering and science areas 
from accredited programs. In some 
cases It may be necessary to require 
courses to fulfill the background. 

The candidate for the M.S. degree 
has the choice of following a plan of 
study with thesis or without thesis. 
The equivalent of at least three years 
of full-time study beyond the B.S. 
degree is required for the Ph.D. 
degree. All students seeking 
graduate degrees In Engineering 
Materials must enroll in ENMA 650, 
660 and 671. In addition to the 
general rules of the Graduate School 
certain special degree requirements 
are set forth by the Department in 
their departmental publications. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

Special facilities available for 
graduate study In Engineering 
Materials are coordinated through 
the Center for Materials Research, 
the Laboratory for Radiation and 
Polymer Science, the Laboratory for 
High Pressure Science and various 
central facilities. Special equipment 
available includes a scanning elec- 
tron microscope, x-ray diffraction 
equipment, crystal growing, sample 
preparation and mechanical testing 
facilities, and high pressure and 
cryogenic equipment. 



Graduate Programs / 101 



Additional Information 

Information is available from the 
Director, Engineering Materials Pro- 
gram, Department of Cfiemical 
Engineering. 

Courses 

ENMA 462 Deformation of Engineering 
Materials. (3) Prerequisites, ENES 230 or 
consent of instructor. Relationship of 
structure to the mechanical properties of 
materials. Elastic and plastic deforma- 
tion, microscopic yield criteria, state of 
stress and ductility. Elements of disloca- 
tion theory, work hardening, alloy 
strengthening, creep, and fracture in 
terms of dislocation theory. 

ENMA 463 Chemical, Liquid and Powder 
Processing of Engineering Materials. (3) 

Prerequisites, ENES 230 or consent of in- 
structor. Methods and processes used in 
the production of primary metals. The 
detailed basic principles of beneficiation 
processes, pyrometallurgy, hydrometal- 
lurgy, electrometallurgy, vapor phase pro- 
cessing and electroplating. Liquid metal 
processing including casting, welding, 
brazing and soldering. Powder process- 
ing and sintering. Shapes and structures 
produced in the above processes. 

ENMA 464 Environmental Effects on 
Engineering Materials. (3) Prerequisites, 
ENES 230 or consent of instructor. In- 
troduction to the phenomena associated 
with the resistance of materials to 
damage under severe environmental con- 
ditions. Oxidation, corrosion, stress cor- 
rosion, corrosion fatigue and radiation 
damage are examined from the point of 
view of mechanism and influence on the 
properties of materials. Methods of cor- 
rosion protection and criteria for selec- 
tion of materials for use in radiation en- 
vironments. 

ENMA 470 Structure and Properties of 
Engineering Materials. (3) A comprehen- 
sive survey of the atomic and electronic 
structure of solids with emphasis on the 
relationship of structure to the physical 
and mechanical properties. 

ENMA 471 Physical Chemistry of 
Engineering Materials. (3) Equilibrium, 
multicomponent systems and relation- 
ship to the phase diagram. Thermo- 
dynamics of polycrystalline and poly- 
phase materials. Diffusion in solids, 
l<inetics of reactions in solids. 

ENMA 472 Technology of Engineering 
Materials. (3) Relationship of properties 
of solids to their engineering applica- 
tions. Criteria for the choice of materials 
for electronic, mechanical and chemical 
properties. Particular emphasis on the 
relationships between structure of the 
solid and its potential engineering ap- 
plication. 

ENMA 473 Processing of Engineering 
Materials. (3) The effect of processing on 
the structure of engineering materials. 
Processes considered include refining, 
melting and solidification, purification by 
zone refining, vapor phase processing, 
mechanical working and heat treatments. 

102 / Graduate Programs 



ENMA 495 Rheology of Engineering 
Materials. (3) Prerequisites; ENES 230 or 
consent of instructor. Study of the defor- 
mation and flow of engineering materials 
and its relationship to structural type. 
Elasticity, visoelasticity, anelasticity and 
plasticity of single phase and 
multiphase materials. Students who have 
credit for ENMA 495 may not take ENGH 
495 for credit. 

ENMA 496 Polymeric Engineering 
Materials. (3) Prerequisite: ENES 230. A 
comprehensive summary of the funda- 
mentals of particular interest in the 
science and applications of polymers. 
Polymer single crystals, transformations 
in polymers, fabrication of polymers as 
to shape and internal structure. Students 
who have credit for ENMA 496 may not 
take ENGH 496 for credit. 

ENMA 650 Structure of Engineering 
Materials. (3) Prerequisite, ENMA 470 or 
equivalent. The structural aspects of 
crystalline and amorphous solids and 
relationships to bonding types. Point and 
space groups. Summary of diffraction 
theory and practice. The reciprocal lat- 
tice. Relationships of the microscopically 
measured properties to crystal sym- 
metry. Structural aspects of defects in 
crystalline solids. 

ENMA 651 Electronic Structure of 
Engineering Materials. (3) Prerequisite: 
ENMA 650. Electronic and magnetic 
materials in relationship to their applica- 
tions. Metallic conductors, resistive 
alloys, superconducting materials, semi- 
conductors, hard and soft magnetic 
materials, Piezo-electric and Piezo- 
magnetic materials, optical materials. 
Emphasis on relationships between elec- 
tronic configuration, crystal structure, 
defect structure and physical properties. 

ENMA 659 Special Topics in Structure of 
Engineering Materials. (3) Prerequisite, 
consent of instructor. 

ENMA 660 Chemical Physics of 
Engineering Materials. (3) Prerequisite, 
Thermodynamics and statistical 
mechanics of engineering solids. Cohe- 
sion, thermodynamic properties. Theory 
of solid solutions. Thermodynamics of 
mechanical, electrical, and magnetic 
phenomena in solids. Chemical thermo- 
dynamics, phase transitions and thermo- 
dynamic properties of polycrystalline and 
polyphase materials. Thermodynamics of 
defects in solids. 

ENMA 661 Kinetics of Reactions in 
Materials. (3) Prerequisite, ENMA 660. 
The theory of thermally activated pro- 
cesses in solids as applied to diffusion, 
nucleation and interface motion. 
Cooperative and diffusionless trans- 
formations. Applications selected from 
processes such as allotropic transforma- 
tions, precipation, martensite formation, 
solidification, ordering, and corrosion. 

ENMA 669 Special Topics in the 
Chemical Physics of Materials. (3) Prereq- 
uisite, consent of instructor. 

ENMA 671 Dislocations in Crystalline 
Materials. (3) Prerequisite, ENMA 650. 



The nature and interactions of defects in 
crystalline solids, with primary emphasis 
on dislocations. The elastic and electric 
fields associated with dislocations. Ef- 
fects of imperfections on mechanical 
and physical properties. 

ENMA 672 Mechanical Properties of 
Engineering Materials. (3) Prerequisite, 
ENMA 671. The mechanical properties of 
single crystals, polycrystalline and 
polyphase materials. Yield strength, work 
hardening, fracture, fatigue and creep are 
considered in terms of fundamental 
material properties. 

ENMA 679 Special Topics in the 
Mechanical Behavior of Materials. (3) Pre- 
requisite, consent of instructor. 

ENMA 680 Experimental Methods in 
Materials Science. (3) Methods of 
measuring the structural aspects of 
materials. Optical and electron 
microscopy. Microscopic analytical 
techniques. Resonance methods. Elec- 
trical, optical and magnetic measure- 
ment techniques. Thermodynamic 
methods. 

ENMA 681 Diffraction Techniques in 
Materials Science. (3) Prerequisite, ENGH 
620. Theory of diffraction of electrons, 
neutrons and x-rays. Strong emphasis on 
diffraction methods as applied to the 
study of defects in solids. Short range 
order, thermal vibrations, stacking faults, 
microstrain. 

ENMA 689 Special Topics in Experimen- 
tal Techniques in Materials Science. (3) 

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. 

ENMA 691 Special Topics in Engineering 
Materials. (3) Prerequisite, consent of in- 
structor. 

ENMA 697 Seminar in Engineering 
Materials. (1). 

ENMA 698 Special Problems in Engineer- 
ing Materials. (1-16). 
ENMA 799 Master's Thesis Research. 
(1-6). 

ENMA 899 Doctoral Dissertation Re- 
search. (1-8). 

English Language and 
Literature Program 

Professor and Chairman: Kenny 

Professors: Bode, Bryer, Freedman, 
Hovey, Isaacs, Lawson, Lutwack, Mish, 
Murphy, Myers, Panichas, Peterson, 
Russell, Salamanca, Schoenbaum, 
Whittemore, Winton 

Associate Professors: Barnes, Barry, 
Birdsall, Brown, Coogan, Cooper, Fry, 
Greenwood, G. Hamilton, Herman, 
Holton, Houppert, Howard, Jellema, 
Kinnaird, Kleine, Mack, Miller, Moore, 
Portz, Smith, Thorberg, Vitzthum, 
Wilson 

Assistant Professors: Burger, Gate, 
Dunn, D. Hamilton, James, I. Ousby, 
Rutherford, Trousdale, Van Egmond, 
Vlach 

Tfie Department of Englisfi offers 
graduate work leading to the 



degrees of Master of Arts and Doc- 
tor of Philosophy. Areas of special- 
ization for the M.A. and Ph.D. in- 
clude: English literature, American 
literature, and folklore. In addition, 
candidates for the M.A. degree may 
specialize in creative writing, and in 
linguistics. 

Admission and Degree Information 

In addition to the general Graduate 
School requirements, applicants to 
the M.A. program ordinarily should 
present a 3.5 GPA in English and a 
minimum of 18 hours of upper-level 
English courses. Applicants to the 
Ph.D. program should present a 3.75 
GPA and an M.A. degree in English. 

Departmental requirements for the 
degree of Master of Arts include: (1) 
ENGL 601; (2) three credits from the 
following: ENGL 482, 483, 484, 485, 
486; (3) six credits in the ENGL 
620/630 series; and (4) six credits of 
seminars. Candidates have a non- 
thesis option under which they take 
30 credits, submit a substantial 
seminar paper for deposit, and pass 
a four-hour comprehensive examina- 
tion. 

Departmental requirements for the 
degree of Doctor of Philosophy in- 
clude: (1) a foreign language require- 
ment; (2) at least three hours of 
linguistics; (3) a comprehensive writ- 
ten examination on three fields (dis- 
sertation field and two additional 
fields) which may be taken with per- 
mission after nine hours beyond the 
Master of Arts and must be taken 
upon the completion of 30 hours. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

In addition to drawing on the cultural 
and intellectual resources of Wash- 
ington, D.C., the English department 
is an active participant in the Folger 
Institute of Renaissance and 18th 
Century Studies. Folger Institute 
fellowships have been awarded to 
advanced graduate students in the 
English department. 

The Department is also a member 
of South Atlantics Graduate English 
(SAGE). Graduate students from 
Maryland may take courses at other 
SAGE institutions, and the English 
department is eligible for a lecturer 
of its choice from another SAGE in- 
stitution. 

Financial Assistance 
Financial assistance is available in 
the form of fellowships and teaching 
assistantships. Fellowships are 



awarded directly by the Graduate 
School to nominees from the 
English department. The number of 
teaching assistantships is con- 
tingent on available funds; currently 
96 students are teaching assistants. 

Additional Information 

Additional information on admis- 
sion, financial aid, and degree re- 
quirements can be obtained from 
Calhoun Winton, Director of 
Graduate Studies, Department of 
English, University of Maryland. 

Courses 

ENGL 401 English Medieval Literature in 

Translation. (3) 

ENGL 402 Chaucer. (3) 

ENGL 403 Shakespeare. (3) Early period: 
histories and comedies. 

ENGL 404 Shakespeare. (3) Late periods: 
tragedies and romances. 

ENGL 405 The Major Works of 
Shakespeare. (3) Students who have 
credit for ENGL 403 or 404 cannot 
receive credit for ENGL 405. 

ENGL 407 Literature of the Renaissance. 

(3) 

ENGL 410 Edmund Spenser. (3) 

ENGL 411 Literature of the Renaissance. 

(3) 

ENGL 412 Literature of the Renaissance. 

(3) 

ENGL 414 Milton. (3) 

ENGL 415 Literature of the Seventeenth 
Century, 1660-1700. (3) 

ENGL 416 Literature of the Eighteenth 
Century. (3) Age of Pope and Swift. 

ENGL 417 Literature of the Eighteenth 
Century. (3) Age of Johnson and the 
Preromantics. 

ENGL 418 Major British Writers. (3) Two 

writers studied intensively each 
semester. 

ENGL 419 Major British Writers. (3) Two 

writers studied intensively each 
semester. 

ENGL 420 Literature of the Romantic 
Period. (3) First generation: Blake, Words- 
worth, Coleridge, et. al. 

ENGL 421 Literature of the Romantic 
Period. (3) Second generation: Keats, 
Shelly, Byron, et. al. 

ENGL 422 Literature of the Victorian 
Period. (3) Early years. 

ENGL 423 Literature of the Victorian 
Period. (3) Middle years. 

ENGL 424 Late Victorian and Edwardian 
Literature. (3) A study of the literary 
movements and techniques which ef- 
fected the transition from Victorian to 
modern literature. 

ENGL 425 Modern British Literature. (3) 

An historical survey of the major writers 



and literary movements in English prose 
and poetry since 1900. 

ENGL 430 American Literature, Begin- 
ning to 1810, the Colonial and Federal 
Periods. (3) 

ENGL 431 American Literature, 1810 to 
1865, The American Renaissance. (3) 

ENGL 432 American Literature, 1865 to 
1914, Realism and Naturalism. (3) 

ENGL 433 American Literature, 1914 to 
the Present, the Modern Period. (3) 

ENGL 434 American Drama. (3) 

ENGL 435 American Poetry ■ Beginning 
to the Present. (3) 

ENGL 436 The Literature of American 
Democracy. (3) 

ENGL 437 Contemporary American 
Literature. (3) A survey of the poetry, 
prose, and drama written in America in 
the last decade. 

ENGL 438 Major American Writers. (3) 

Two writers studied intensively each 
semester. 

ENGL 439 Major American Writers. (3) 

Two writers studied intensively each 
semester. 

ENGL 440 The Novel in America to 1910. 

(3) 

ENGL 441 The Novel in America Since 

1910. (3) 

ENGL 442 Literature of the South. (3) A 

historical survey, from eighteenth- 
century beginnings to the present. 

ENGL 443 Afro-American Literature. (3) 

An examination of the literary expression 
of the Negro in the United States, from 
its beginning to the present. 

ENGL 444 Experimental Approaches to 
Literature • Emerson and Thoreau. (3) 

Variable subject matter presented in ex- 
perimental methods and approaches. 
Grading in satisfactory/fail only. Consent 
of instructor required for admission. 

ENGL 445 Modern British and American 
Poetry. (3) Prerequisite - permission of in- 
structor required for students with credit 
in ENGL 345. A study of the formation of 
the 'modern tradition' in British and 
American poetry, exploring the distinc- 
tive energy and consciousness in the 
poets of the early twentieth century 
(1896-1930). Special emphasis on 
Hopkins, Yeats, Pound, Eliot, and 
Stevens. Collateral readings in essays on 
modern poetics, and in other poets of the 
period. 

ENGL 446 Contemporary British and 
American Poetry. (3) Prerequisite - per- 
mission of instructor required for 
students with credit in ENGL 345. A 
study of British and American poetry 
from the depression to the present. 
Special emphasis on Auden, Williams, 
Dylan Thomas, Theodore Roethke, 
Robert Lowell. A more general study of 
the work of some of these: Berryman, 
Jarrell, Fuller, Bishop, Wright, Kinnell, 
Larkin and including the projectivists, the 
Beats and the present scene. 



Graduate Programs / 103 



ENGL 447 Satire. (3) An introduction to 

Englisti and American satire from 

Chaucer to ttie present. 

ENGL 449 Playwriting. (3) 

ENGL 450 Elizabethan and Jacobean 

Drama. (3) Beginnings to Marlowe. 

ENGL 451 Elizabethan and Jacobean 

Drama. (3) Jonson to Webster. 

ENGL 452 English Drama from 1660 to 

1800.(3) 

ENGL 453 Literary Criticism. (3) 

ENGL 454 Modern Drama. (3) 

ENGL 455 The English Novel. (3) Eigh- 
teenth Century. 

ENGL 456 The English Novel. (3) Nine- 
teenth Century. 

ENGL 457 The Modern Novel. (3) 

ENGL 460 Introduction to Folklore. (3) 

ENGL 461 Folk Narrative. (3) Studies in 
legend, tale, and myth. Prerequisite, 
ENGL 460. 

ENGL 462 Folksong and Ballad. (3) Pre- 
requisite, ENGL 460. 
ENGL 463 American Folklore. (3) Prereq- 
uisite, ENGL 460. An examination of 
American folklore in terms of history and 
regional folk cultures. Exploration of col- 
lections of folklore from various areas to 
reveal the difference in regional and 
ethnic groups as vifitnessed in their oral 
and literary traditions. 

ENGL 464 Afro-American Folklore and 
Culture. (3) An examination of the culture 
of the Negro in the United States in 
terms of history (antebellum to the 
present) and social changes (rural to ur- 
ban). Exploration of aspects of Negro 
culture and history via oral and literary 
traditions and life histories. 

ENGL 465 Urban Folklore. (3) Prereq- 
uisite, ENGL 460. An examination of the 
folklore currently originating in white, ur- 
ban, American culture. 

ENGL 476 Modem Fantasy and Science 
Fiction. (3) Major works of fantasy and 
science fiction since the mid-eighteenth 
century, emphasizing their continuity 
and their relationships to philosophical 
speculation, scientific discovery, literary 
history and cultural change. 

ENGL 478 Selected Topics in English 
and American Literature before 1800. (3) 

ENGL 479 Selected Topics in English an 
American Literature after 1800. (3) 

ENGL 481 Introduction to English Gram- 
mar. (3) A brief review of traditional 
English grammar and an introduction to 
structural grammar, including phonology, 
morphology and syntax. 

ENGL 482 History of the English 
Language. (3) 

ENGL 483 American English. (3) 

ENGL 484 Advanced English Grammar. 

(3) Credit may not be granted in both 
ENGL 434 and LING 402. 

ENGL 485 Advanced English Structure. 
(3) 

104 / Graduate Programs 



ENGL 486 Introduction to Old English. (3) 

An introduction to the grammar, syntax, 
and phonology of Old English. Selected 
readings from Old English prose and 
poetry. 

ENGL 489 Special Topics in English 

Language. (3) Studies in topics of current 

interest; repeatable to a maximum of 9 

hours. 

ENGL 493 Advanced Expository Writing. 

(3) 

ENGL 498 Creative Writing. (3) 

ENGL 499 Advanced Creative Writing. (3) 

ENGL 601 Bibliography and Methods. (3) 

ENGL 602 Middle English. (3) 

ENGL 603 English Language - Old 
English to Early Modern English. (3) 

ENGL 604 Old English. (3) Grammar, syn- 
tax, phonology and prosody of Old 
English. Designed to give graduate 
students a working knowledge of Old 
English and to introduce them to the ma- 
jor Old English texts in the original. 

ENGL 611 Approaches to College Com- 
position. (3) A seminar emphasizing 
rhetorical and linguistic foundations for 
the handling of a course in freshman 
composition. For graduate assistants 
(optional to other graduate students). 

ENGL 620 Reading in Medieval English 
Literature. (3) 

ENGL 621 Readings In Renaissance 
English Literature. (3) 

ENGL 622 Readings in Seventeenth- 
Century English Literature. (3) 

ENGL 623 Readings Eighteenth-Century 
English Literature. (3) 
ENGL 624 Readings in English Romantic 
Literature. (3) 

ENGL 625 Readings In English Victorian 
Literature. (3) 

ENGL 626 Readings in American 
Literature before 1865. (3) 

ENGL 627 Readings in American 
Literature since 1865. (3) 

ENGL 630 Readings in 20th Century 
English Literature. (3) 

ENGL 718 Seminar in Medieval 
Literature. (3) 

ENGL 719 Seminar in Renaissance 
Literature. (3) 

ENGL 728 Seminar in Seventeenth- 
Century Literature. (3) 

ENGL 729 Seminar in Eighteenth-Century 
Literature. (3) 

ENGL 738 Seminar in Nineteenth- 
Century Literature. (3) 

ENGL 739 Seminar In Nineteenth- 
Century Literature. (3) 

ENGL 748 Seminar in American 
Literature. (3) 

ENGL 749 Studies in Twentieth-Century 
Literature. (3) 

ENGL 758 Literary Criticism. (3) 



ENGL 759 Seminar in Literature and the 
Other Arts. (3) 

ENGL 768 Studies in Drama (3) 

ENGL 769 Studies in Fiction. (3) 

ENGL 778 Seminar in Folklore. (3) 

ENGL 788 Studies in the English 
Language. (3) May be repeated for credit 
to a maximum of 9 hours. 

ENGL 799 Master's Thesis Research. 

(1-6) 

ENGL 819 Seminar in Themes and Types 

in English Literature. (3) 

ENGL 828 Seminar in Themes and Types 
in American Literature. (3) 

ENGL 899 Doctoral Dissertation Re- 
search. (1-8) 
Linguistics 
LING 401 Phonetic and Phonemlcs. (3) 

Training in the identification, description 
and symbolization of various sounds 
found in language. Study of scientific 
techniques for classifying sounds into 
units which are perceptually relevant for 
a given language. 

LING 402 Morphology and Syntax. (3) A 
detailed study of language structure. No 
student may receive credit for both LING 
402 and ENGL 484. 

LING 403 Historical Linguistics. (3) Pre- 
requisite, LING 401 and 402, or 
equivalent. A study of change in the 
phonological, grammatical and semantic 
structures of natural languages: 
language typology: reconstruction and 
various allied topics will be treated. 
LING 498 Seminar in Linguistics. (3) Pre- 
requisite: LING 100. Advanced topics in 
linguistics. Lectures and discussions by 
faculty, students and invited outside 
scholars. Repeatable to a maximum of 
six credits provided content is different. 

LING 609 Seminar in Linguistics. (3) 

Entomology Program 

Professor and Chairmar): Steinhauer 
Professors: Bickley, Davidson, Harrison, 

Jones, Menzer, Messersmith, Wirth 
Associate Professors: Caron, Miller, 

Reichelderfer, Wood 
Assistant Professors: Armstrong, Denno, 

Dively, Hellman, Nelson 
Lecturer: Spangler 

The Departnnent of Entomology of- 
fers both the M.S. and Ph.D. 
degrees. Graduate students may 
specialize in physiology and mor- 
phology, toxicology, biosystematlcs, 
ecology and behavior, medical ento- 
mology, apiculture, insect pathology, 
and economic entomology. 

Admission and Degree Information 

Students applying for graduate w/ork 
In entomology are expected to have 
strong backgrounds in the biological 
sciences, chemistry and mathe- 
matics. Since the Department Is par- 



ticularly anxious to find strong basic 
preparation, an undergraduate major 
in entomology is not required for ad- 
mission to the program. Students 
lacking certain specific courses in 
their undergraduate program may 
need to extend the normal period of 
time required for the degree. 

In the M.S. and Ph.D. programs, 
the student is given great latitude in 
the selection of the advisory study 
committee, choice of the major 
study areas and supporting course 
work and choice of the research pro- 
gram. The M.S. degree is awarded 
following the successful completion 
of the course requirements and a 
satisfactory thesis. A non-thesis 
M.S. option is available for those in- 
terested in qualifying as pest 
management specialists. In this pro- 
gram a field experience course in- 
cluding a comprehensive report is 
substituted for the thesis. 

The demonstration of competence 
in one foreign language is required 
for the Ph.D. Upon admission to the 
Ph.D. program, the student is given a 
preliminary interview (which may be 
combined with the M.S. final oral ex- 
amination) in which the program of 
course work and collateral reading, 
the plan for demonstration of com- 
petence in the foreign language 
chosen, and the general outline of 
the proposed research area are 
established and approved. Following 
the completion of most course work 
and the demonstration of foreign 
language competency, the oral quali- 
fying examination is administered 
before the student applies for admis- 
sion to candidacy. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

Facilities are maintained in the 
Department for research in all areas 
of specialization offered, and in addi- 
tion, cooperative programs with 
other departments in Agricultural 
and Life Sciences are possible. 
Cooperative research programs are 
often maintained by the Department 
with several government agencies, 
such as the Beltsville Agricultural 
Research Center, the U.S. National 
Museum of Natural History, and the 
Walter Reed Army Institute of 
Research. Specialized facilities are 
frequently made available to 
graduate students in these pro- 
grams. In many instances graduates 
of the programs in entomology find 



employment in such government 
agencies because of the contacts 
made in these cooperative projects. 

Financial Assistance 

There are a limited number of 
teaching and research assistant- 
ships available to entomology 
graduate students on a competitive 
basis. Several part-time employment 
opportunities are available in govern- 
mental and private research and 
developmental laboratories in the 
area. 

Additional Information 

The Department's "Guidelines for 
Graduate Students" give additional 
information on the graduate pro- 
gram, including requirements for ad- 
mission, course requirements, ex- 
aminations, seminars, and research 
areas and facilities. Copies are 
available from the Department of En- 
tomology, University of Maryland. 
Courses 

ENTM 407 Entomology for Science 
Teachers. (4) Summer. Four lectures and 
four three-hour laboratory periods a 
week. This course will include the 
elements of morphology, taxonomy and 
biology of insects using examples com- 
monly available to high school teachers. 
It will include practice in collecting, 
perserving, rearing and experimenting 
with insects insofar as time will permit. 

ENTM 412 Advanced Apiculture. (3) One 

lecture and two three-hour laboratory 
periods a week. Prerequisite, ENTM 111. 
The theory and practice of apiary 
management. Designed for the student 
who wishes to keep bees or requires a 
practical knowledge of bee management. 

ENTM 421 Insect Taxonomy and Biology. 

(4) Two lectures and two three-hour 
laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite: 
ENTM 204. Introduction to the principles 
of systematic entomology and the study 
of all orders and the important families 
of insects; immature forms considered. 

ENTM 432 Insect Morphology. (4) Two 

lectures and two three-hour laboratory 
periods a week. Prerequisite: ENTM 204. 
A basic study of insect form, structure 
and organization in relation to function. 

ENTM 442 Insect Physiology. (4) Prereq- 
uisites: ENTM 204 and CHEM 104 or 
equivalent. Three lectures and one three- 
hour laboratory per week. Functions of 
internal body systems in insects. 

ENTM 451 Economic Entomology. (4) 

Two lectures and two two-hour 
laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite: 
ENTM 204. The recognition, biology and 
control of insects injurious to fruit and 
vegetable crops, field crops and stored 
products. 

ENTM 452 Insecticides. (2) Prerequisite, 
consent of the department. The develop- 



ment and use of contact and stomach 
poisons, fumigants and other important 
chemicals, with reference to their 
chemistry, toxic action, compatability, 
and host injury. Recent research em- 
phasized. 

ENTM 453 Insect Pests of Ornamental 
Plants. (3) Prerequisite: ENTM 204. Two 
lectures and one three-hour laboratory 
period a week. The recognition, biology 
and control of insects and mites in- 
jurious to ornamental shrubs, trees and 
greenhouse crops. Emphasis is placed 
on the pests of woody ornamental 
plants. 

ENTM 462 Insect Pathology. (3) Two lec- 
tures and one three-hour laboratory 
period per week. Prerequisite, MICB 200, 
prerequisite or corequisite, ENTM 442 or 
consent of the instructor. An introduc- 
tion to the principal insect pathogens 
with special reference to symptomology, 
epizootiology, and microbial control of 
insect pests. 

ENTM 472 Medical and Veterinary En- 
tomology. (4) Three lectures and one two- 
hour laboratory period a week. Prereq- 
uisite: ENTM 204 or consent of depart- 
ment. A study of the morphology, tax- 
onomy, biology and control of the ar- 
thropod parasites and disease vectors of 
man and animals. The ecology and 
behavior of vectors in relation to disease 
transmission will be emphasized. 

ENTM 498 Seminar. (1) Prerequisite, 
senior standing. Presentation of original 
work, reviews and abstracts of literature. 

ENTM 612 Insect Ecology. (2) Second 
semester. One lecture and one two-hour 
laboratory period a week. Prerequisite, 
consent of the department. A study of 
fundamental factors involved in the rela- 
tionship of insects to their environment. 
Emphasis is placed on the insect as a 
dynamic organism adjusted to its sur- 
roundings. 

ENTM 625 Experimental Honey Bee 
Biology. (2) First semester. One three- 
hour lab a week. Fifteen labs during 
semester will include topics such as 
communication, nest construction and 
organization, behavior, insect societies 
and bee and wasp biology. 

ENTM 641 Advances in Insect 
Physiology. (2) First semester, alternate 
years. Two lectures a week. Prereq- 
uisites, ENTM 442 or consent of instruc- 
tor. Lectures on current literature with 
reading assignments and discussion. 

ENTM 643 Aspects of Insect 
Biochemistry. (2) First semester. Two lec- 
tures a week. (Alternate years.) Prereq- 
uisite, one year of biochemistry, or 
equivalent, or consent of the instructor. 
Lectures and group discussions on the 
energy sources of insects, intermediary 
metabolism, utilization of energy sources 
specialized subjects of current interest, 
such as light production, insect pigment 
formation, pheromones, venoms, and 
chemical defense mechanisms. 

ENTM 653 Toxicology of Insecticides. (4) 

First semester. Three lectures and one 



Graduate Programs / 105 



three-hour laboratory period a week. 
(Alternate years, not offered 1977-1978.) 
Prerequisite, permission of the instruc- 
tor. A study of the physical, chemical, 
and biological properties of insecticides. 
Emphasis is placed on the relationship of 
chemical structures to insecticidal activi- 
ty and mode of action. Mechanisms of 
resistance are also considered. 

ENTM 654 Insect Pest Population 
Management. (2) Two lectures a week. 
Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Cur- 
rent developments in pest management 
theory and practice. Emphasis on agro- 
ecosystem components and their 
manipulation. Population sampling, 
damage thresholds, cost-benefit relation- 
ships, and modeling in pest manage- 
ment. 

ENTM 672 Culicidology. (2) Second 
semester. One lecture and one three- 
hour laboratory period a week. (Alternate 
years.) The classification, distribution, 
ecology, biology, and control of mos- 
quitoes. 

ENTM 689 Entomological Topics. (1-3) 

First and second semesters. One lecture 
or one two-hour laboratory period a week 
for each credit hour. Prerequisite, con- 
sent of department. Lectures, group 
discussions or laboratory sessions on 
selected topics such as: aquatic insects, 
biological control of insects, entomolog- 
ical literature, forest entomology, history 
of entomology, insect biochemistry, in- 
sect embryology, immature insects, In- 
sect behavior, principles of economic en- 
tomology, insect communication, prin- 
ciples of entomological research. 

ENTM 698 Seminar. (1) Presentation of 
topics of current interest, including 
thesis and dissertation research, by 
faculty members, students, and outside 
speakers. 

ENTM 699 Advanced Entomology. (1-6) 

Credit and prerequisites to be deter- 
mined by the department. First and sec- 
ond semesters. Studies of minor prob- 
lems in morphology, physiology, tax- 
onomy and applied entomology, with par- 
ticular reference to the preparation of the 
student for individual research. 

ENTM 789 Field Experience in Pest 
Management. (1-6) Prerequisite, ENTM 
654 or consent of the department. In- 
volvement in practical problems of pest 
management in field situations. The stu- 
dent will be assigned to a problem area 
for intensive experience, usually during 
the summer. A final written report is re- 
quired for each assignment. Repeatable 
to a maximum of six credits. 

ENTM 799 Master's Tliesis Research. 
(1-6) 

ENTM 899 Doctoral Dissertation Re- 
search. (1-8) 

Family And Community 
Development Program 

Professor and Chairman: Gaylin 
Associate Professors: Brabble, Myricks, 
Rubin, Wilson 

106 / Graduate Programs 



Assistant Professors: Churaman, 

Garrison, Orvedal 
A Master of Science Degree in Fami- 
ly and Community Development is 
offered under a graduage program 
within the College of Human 
Ecology. The program is particularly 
responsive to the contemporary 
needs of families and the most ef- 
fective ways of providing programs 
and services in the community. 

The program objectives of the 
Department of Family and Communi- 
ty Development are directed toward 
educating professionals who are 
prepared to develop and direct a 
variety of programs and services that 
are both family-oriented and com- 
munity based. The areas of 
specialization in the Department are: 
family studies, community studies 
with particular emphasis on pro- 
grams serving families, and manage- 
ment and consumer studies. Faculty 
members use and encourage an in- 
terdisciplinary approach to the study 
of human problems related to social 
change and to helping students 
become agents of change, through 
the family unit. 

An integrated practicum ex- 
perience is offered which enables 
students to work directly with 
families and community agencies. 
Admission and Degree Information 
The Department will continue to 
adopt the policies of the Graduate 
School as the basic criteria for ad- 
mission to the Master's program. In 
addition, it is recommended that in- 
dividuals take the Aptitude section 
of the GRE, and have adequate 
undergraduate preparation in one or 
more of the following areas: family 
development, psychology, sociology, 
or human ecology. A course in 
elementary statistics at the under- 
graduate level is required. 

The Master's program is 30 hours. 
The student may choose either the 
thesis or non-thesis option. Six 
hours of thesis research are required 
for those students selecting the 
thesis option. The non-thesis option 
permits more extensive field ex- 
perience in lieu of the research 
thesis. Any student selecting this 
option will complete 30 hours of 
course work with oral and written 
comprehensive examinations upon 
completion. 
Financial Assistance 
Due to the limited number of 



available Graduate Teaching 
Assistantships, and the high de- 
mand, application for financial aid 
should be made prior to April 1st, for 
the fall semester of the coming year. 

Additional Information 

Further information regarding this 
program should be obtained by con- 
tacting the Department or the Col- 
lege of Human Ecology directly. 

Courses 

FMCD 431 Farnily Crises and Rehabilita- 
tion. (3) Deals with various types of fami- 
ly crises situations and how families 
cope with the rehabilitation process. It 
covers issues at various stages of the 
family cycle ranging from divorce, 
teenage runaways, abortion, to the effect 
of death on a family. Role playing and in- 
terviewing techniques are demonstrated 
and ways of helping the family through 
the crises are emphasized. 

FMCD 443 Consumer Problems. (3) Con- 
sumer practices of American families. 
Merchandising practices as they affect 
the consumer. Organizations and laws in 
the interest of the consumer. 

FMCD 446 Living Experiences With 
Families. (3-6) 

A — Domestic Intercultural 
B — International Intercultural 
Prerequisites: FMCD 330, ANTH 101; 
FMCD 250; optional, language com- 
petence. An individual experience in liv- 
ing with families of a sub-culture within 
the U.S. or with families of another coun- 
try, participating in family and communi- 
ty activities. A foreign student may par- 
ticipate and live with an American family. 

FMCD 447 Home Management for the 
Disabled. (3) Application of home 
management concepts in the use of 
resources to promote maintenance of 
homemaker independence through 
physiological and psychological ad- 
justments in the family and home en- 
vironment. The purpose of this course is 
to prepare students for working effective- 
ly with disabled homemakers. 

FMCD 448 Selected Topics in Home 
Management. (3) Seminar format will be 
used to examine the ways families set 
priorities and organize their efforts and 
resources to achieve both social and 
economic goals. Prior registration in 
FMCD 250, 341, or other courses in 
management theory, systems analysis or 
research methods is desirable. 
Repeatable for a maximum of 6 credits 
provided subject matter is different. 

FMCD 453 Family-Community Advocacy. 

(3) Legislative efforts, state and federal, 
which have impact on families. The 
techniques, tactics, and strategies of lob- 
byists. 

FMCD 485 Introduction to Family 
Counseling. (3) Provides the fundamental 
theoretical concepts and clinical pro- 
cedures that are unique to marital and 



family therapy. These techniques are 
contrasted with individually-orientated 
psychotherapy. Pre-marital, marital and 
family, and divorce counseling techni- 
ques are demonstrated and evaluated. 

FMCD 487 Legal Aspects of Family Prob- 
lems. (3) Laws and legal involvement that 
directly affect specific aspects of the 
family: adoption, marriage, estate plan- 
ning, property rights, wills, etc. Emphasis 
will be given to the involvement of a pro- 
fessional lawyer; principles and inter- 
pretation of the law. 

FMCD 499 Special Topics. (1-3) 

A — Family studies 

B — Community studies 

C — Management and consumer studies 

FMCD 600 Readings in Research and 
Theory of the Family. (3) Emphasis is 
placed on surveying current research. 
concepts and theory in marital and family 
dynamics. The relationship of the con- 
temporary family to the society and com- 
munity are discussed and family patterns 
within various social classes and across 
different cultures are compared. 
Changes in family functioning through- 
out the family life cycle and over the last 
hundred years are described and analyz- 
ed. 

FMCD 602 Integrative Aspects of Human 
Ecology. (3) The philosophical foundation 
tor the home economics profession are 
explored in this course. An historical ap- 
proach is used in part to indicate the 
growth of home economics, its relation- 
ship to other disciplines and its in- 
tegrative function for the practitioner of 
the applied human sciences. Emphasis is 
placed upon recent trends and future 
directions for the professional as change 
agent and his role within society. 

FMCD 609 Seminar Current Issues in 
Family and Community Development. 
(1-4) This seminar will be open to all 
graduate students for non-credit or 
variable credit by prior arrangement. It is 
considered an informal vehicle to 
generate communication and discussion 
among all members of the department. 
Presentations will include reviews and 
critiques of recent articles and books 
within the field and those relevent to it. 
In addition, original informal discussion 
papers from faculty and students will be 
generated for presentation and discus- 
sion. Guest speakers and discussants 
will be encouraged when deemed ap- 
propriate. 

FMCD 610 Familimetrics. (3) Prerequi- 
sites. FMCD 401 and statistics. The 
primary focus is on the advantages and 
limitations of family research procedures 
and the degree of correspondence be- 
tween these methods. Ways of develop- 
ing and evaluating adequate research 
procedures will be emphasized and re- 
cent innovations in the field will be con- 
sidered. 

FMCD 615 Community Interaction With 
Families. (3) A study of relationships of 
the individual within the family and in- 
volvement with the community. Com- 



munity organization and structure will be 
studied from the perspective of (1) in- 
dividual involvement; (2) family involve- 
ment; (3) intergroup involvement, i.e., 
racial, ethnic, religious and class groups. 
Theoretical frameworks are to be 
developed with effective operational ap- 
proaches applied in local community 
organizations. Students will participate 
in studying available community groups 
and their effects on individuals. Govern- 
mental agency programs and funded 
community projects will be studied, with 
special attention given to the philosophy 
of various funding agencies. 

FMCD 625 Advanced Consumer Affairs. 

(3) An analysis of current consumer 
behavior found in various family life 
styles and of community processes for 
dealing with consumer problems. Em- 
phasis is given to recent research and 
theoretical frameworks in the consumer 
area. 

FMCD 660 Program Planning and Evalua- 
tion. (1-6) Consideration is given to 
research program development and/or 
evaluation of an existing research pro- 
gram in relation to objectives and need. 
Reporting of research for publication in a 
journal and periodicals will also be 
stressed. 

FMCD 668 Special Topics in Family Life. 
(1-6) Individual study or arranged group 
study. 

FMCD 678 Special Topics in Community 
Services. (1-6) Individual study or ar- 
ranged group study. 

FMCD 686 Introduction to Family 
Counseling. (3) This course gives the fun- 
damental theoretical concepts and 
clinical procedures that are unique to 
family and marital therapy. Family and 
marital therapy are contrasted with 
individually-oriented psychotherapy in 
terms of historical development, assump- 
tions and techniques. Various types of 
clinical techniques for marital and family 
therapists are presented. Premarital, 
marital and family, divorce counseling 
approaches are considered. 

FMCD 688 Special Topics in 
Management-Consumer. (1-6) Individual 
study or arranged group study. 

FMCD 691 Family-Community Consulta- 
tion. (3) The foci of this course are upon 
defining areas of behavior which can be 
referred to the family-community consul- 
tant and upon methodology which can be 
applied by the consultant to family or 
professional situations. Roles such as 
homemaker rehabilitation consultant 
could receive added emphasis through 
field experience participation which is 
encouraged in the course. 

FMCD 695 Practicum in Family and Com- 
munity Services. (3) A field experience 
which provides one of the following: (1) 
direct contact with family life styles dif- 
ferent from one's own (2) observation 
and/or (3) experience of a professional 
role in working with families (consulting, 
counseling, informal education, leader- 
ship training, community action, case 



work. etc.). Observation and/or ex- 
perience with services, educational pro- 
grams or action programs dealing with a 
particular type of family problem (finan- 
cial, consumer, help in emergencies, 
health, housing, homemaker rehabilita- 
tion, family realtionships and 
management) will be included. 

FMCD 698 Special Topics in General 
Human Ecology. (1-6) Individual study or 
arranged group study. 

FMCD 799 Master's Thesis Research. 

(1-6) 

Food, Nutrition and Institu- 
tion Administration 
Program 

Professor and Chairman: Prather 
Professors: Ahrens. Beaton 
Associate Professors: Butler, Cox, 

Williams 
Assistant Professors: Poplai, Wodarski 
Adjunct Professors: Stewart, Trout 

The Department offers a program 
leading to a Master of Science 
degree in each of the following ma- 
jor areas: food, nutrition, and institu- 
tion administration. The Department 
participates in an interdepartmental 
program for Master of Science and 
Doctor of Philosophy degrees in 
nutritional science which is de- 
scribed under that title. The area of 
food includes study in experimental 
foods as well as cultural and con- 
sumer aspects of food. Nutrition in- 
cludes the science of nutrition as 
well as the broad area of community 
nutrition. Institution administration 
includes all phases of food service 
systems. 

Admission and Degree Information 

In addition to minimum Graduate 
School requirements, a satisfactory 
score on the aptitude portion of the 
Graduate Record Examination is re- 
quired. A minimum combination of 
900 with a minimum of 400 on both 
the verbal and quantitative is re- 
quired for admission. 

Thesis and non-thesis options are 
available for the Masters of Science 
degree in food, nutrition or institu- 
tion administration, but the Master 
of Science degree in nutritional 
science is available only through a 
thesis option. 

All students are required to take a 
Seminar, a statistics and a Research 
Methods course. Other courses are 
selected with the guidance of an ad- 
visor and/or a committee. Non-thesis 
option students must prepare a 
research paper, present an addi- 

Graduate Programs / 107 



tional seminar and take a written 
comprehensive examination in addi- 
tion to an oral examination. An 
average of three or four semesters is 
usually required to complete the 
M.S. thesis option and two or three 
semesters for the non-thesis option. 
Facilities and Special Resources 
The Department has special ar- 
rangements and cooperative 
agreements with laboratories at the 
Nutrition Institute, A.R.S., U.S.D.A. 
and the University Affiliated Program 
in Child Development at Georgetown 
University Hospital Clinic, for 
students in nutrition and foods. 
There are faculty with advanced 
degrees in the areas of food 
chemistry, cultural foods, com- 
munity nutrition, human and animal 
nutrition, and food service systems. 

Financial Assistance 

There are a limited number of 
graduate teaching assistantships 
and research assistantships 
available. 

Additional Information 
Copies of a Department mimeograph 
with additional information concern- 
ing admission requirements, 
courses, faculty, facilities, etc. are 
available from the Department Chair- 
man. 
Courses 
Food 

FOOD 440 Advanced Food Science. (3) 
Three lectures per week. Prerequisites: 
FOOD 250 and CHEM 261 or 461. 
Chemical and physical properties of food 
as related to consumer use in the home 
and institutions. 

FOOD 445 Advanced Food Science 
Laboratory. (1) One three-hour laboratory 
per week. Prerequisite, CHEM 201 and 
consent of instructor. Chemical deter- 
mination of selected components in 
animal and plant foods. 

FOOD 450 Experimental Food Science. 

(3) One lecture, two laboratories per 
week. Prerequisite, FOOD 440 or 
equivalent. Individual and group 
laboratory experimentation as an in- 
troduction to methods of food research. 

FOOD 480 Food Additives. (3) Prereq- 
uisite: FOOD 440 or equivalent. Effects 
of intentional and incidental additives on 
food quality, nutritive value and safety. 
Current regulatory procedures. 

FOOD 490 Special Problems in Foods. 
(2-3) Prerequisite, FOOD 440 and consent 
of instructor. Individual selected prob- 
lems in the area of food science. 

FOOD 498 Special Topics. (1-3) Prereq- 
uisite: consent ot instructor. Selected 
current aspects of food. Repeatable to a 



maximum of six credits if the subject 
matter is substantially different. 
FOOD 610 Readings in Food. (3) Prereq- 
uisite: FOOD 440 or consent of instruc- 
tor. A critical survey of the literature of 
recent developments in food research. 

FOOD 820 Nutritional and Quality Evalua- 
tion of Food. (3) Prerequisite: FOOD 440 
or consent of instructor. Effects of pro- 
duction, processing, marketing, storage, 
and preparation on nutritive value and 
quality of foods. 

FOOD 640 Food Enzymes. (3) First 
semester, alternate years. Two lectures 
and one three-hour laboratory. Prereq- 
uisite, FOOD 440 or equivalent. The 
classification and behavior of naturally 
occurring and added enzymes in food; in- 
cludes the effects of temperature, PH, 
radiation, moisture, etc., on enzyme ac- 
tivity. 

FOOD 650 Advanced Experimental Food. 
(3-5) Second semester. Two lectures and 
three laboratory periods a week. Selected 
readings of literature in experimental 
foods. Development of individual 
problem. 

FOOD 660 Research Methods. (3) Prereq- 
uisite: a statistics course. A study of ap- 
propriate research methodology and 
theories including experimental design. 
Each student is required to develop a 
specimen research proposal. 

FOOD 678 Special Topics in Foods. (1-6) 

Individual or group study in an area of 

foods. 

FOOD 688 Seminar. (1-2) Reports and 

Discussions of Current Research in 

Foods. 

FOOD 799 Master's Thesis Research. (1-6) 
Nutrition 

NUTR 425 International Nutrition. (2) Two 

lectures per week. Prerequisite, course in 
basic nutrition. Nutritional status of 
world population and local, national and 
international programs for improvement. 

NUTR 430 Nutritional Biochemistry. (3) 

Prerequisite: CHEM 261 or equivalent. 
Nutritional biochemistry with special em- 
phasis on the relationship between bio- 
chemistry and nutrition. 
NUTR 435 History of Nutrition. (2) Two 
lectures per week. Prerequisite, course in 
basic nutrition. A study of the develop- 
ment of the knowledge of nutrition and 
its interrelationship with social and 
economic developments. 

NUTR 450 Advance Human Nutrition. (3) 

Prerequisites: consent of department: 
NUTR 300 and CHEM 261 or concurrent 
registration in CHEM 462. Two lectures 
and one two-hour laboratory. A critical 
study of the physiological and metabolic 
influences on nutrient utilization, with 
particular emphasis on current problems 
in human nutrition. 

NUTR 460 Therapeutic Human Nutrition. 

(3) Two lectures and one laboratory 
period a week. Prerequisites, NUTR 300, 
450. Modifications of the normal ade- 



quate diet to meet human nutritional 
needs in pathological conditions. 

NUTR 470 Community Nutrition. (3) Pre- 
requisites: NUTR 300, 450, 460. A study 
of different types of community nutrition 
programs, problems and projects. 

NUTR 480 Applied Diet Therapy. (3) Open 

only to students accepted into and par- 
ticipating in the U.S. army dietetic intern- 
ship program at Walter Reed General 
Hospital or the coordinated undergradu- 
ate dietetics program. Application of 
principles of normal and therapeutic 
nutrition in total medical care and 
instruction of patients. Clinical ex- 
periences in hospital therapeutics, 
pediatrics, research and a variety of 
clinics are included. For students in the 
coordinated undergraduate dietetics pro- 
gram, 238 hours of clinical experience is 
required and this course must be accom- 
panied by NUTR 460. 

NUTR 485 Applied Community Nutrition. 

(3) Prerequisite: NUTR 460 and concur- 
rent registration in NUTR 470. Open only 
to students accepted into and participat- 
ing in the coordinated undergraduate 
program in dietetics. Application of prin- 
ciples in community nutrition through 
guided experiences in different aspects 
of nutrition programs in the community. 
This course requires 238 hours of clinical 
experience. 

NUTR 490 Special Problems in Nutrition. 
(2-3) Prerequisites, NUTR 300 and con- 
sent of instructor. Individual selected 
problems in the area of human nutrition. 

NUTR 498 Special Topics. (1-3) Prereq- 
uisite: consent of instructor. Selected 
current aspects of nutrition. Repeatable 
to a maximum of six credits if the sub- 
ject matter is substantially different. 

NUTR 600 Recent Progress in Human 
Nutrition. (3) Recent developments in the 
science of nutrition with emphasis on 
the interpretation of these findings for 
application in health and disease. 
NUTR 610 Readings in Nutrition. (1-3) 
Reports and discussions of significant 
nutritional research and investigation. 

NUTR 615 Maternal and Infant Nutrition. 

(3) Prerequisite: NUTR 460 or equivalent, 
or consent of instructor. Current 
literature concerning the importance of 
diet during pregnancy and infancy on the 
health of the mother and infant. Physio- 
logical and biochemical changes during 
pregnancy and infancy, current issues in 
infant feeding, such as possible effects 
of diet during infancy on obesity and 
degenerative diseases in later life, and 
current public healtn programs designed 
to serve pregnant women and infants. 
NUTR 620 Nutrition for Community Ser- 
vices. (3) Application of the principles of 
nutrition to various community problems 
of specific groups of the public. 
Students may select specific problems 
for independent study. 

NUTR 630 Nutritional Aspects of Energy 
Balance. (3) Prerequisite: CHEM 462 or 
equivalent, or consent of instructor. The 



108 / Graduate Programs 



prevalence and basic causes of caloric 
imbalance, along with a wide variety of 
approacfies to weigfit control. 

NUTR 660 Research Methods. (3) Prereq- 
uisite, a statistics course. A study of ap- 
propriate research mettiodology and 
theories including experimental design. 
Each student is required to develop a 
specimen research proposal. 

NUTR 670 Intermediary Metabolism in 
Nutrition. (3) Second semester. Prereq- 
uisite, CHEM 461, 462 or equivalent. The 
major routes of carbohydrate, fat, and 
protein metabolism with particular em- 
phasis on metabolic shifts and their 
detection and significance in nutrition. 

NUTR 678 Special Topics in Nutrition. 
(1-6) Individual or group study in an area 
of nutrition. 

NUTR 680 Human Nutritional Status. (3) 

First semester, alternate years. Methods 
of appraisal of human nutritional status, 
to include dietary, biochemical and an- 
thropometric techniques. 

NUTR 698 Seminar in Nutrition. (1-3) A 

study in depth of a selected phase of 
nutrition. 

NUTR 699 Problems in Nutrition. (1-4) 

Prerequisite, permission of faculty. Ex- 
perience in a phase of nutrition of in- 
terest to the student. Use is made of ex- 
perimental animals, human studies and 
extensive, critical studies of research 
methods, techniques or data of specific 
projects. 

NUTR 799 Master's Thesis Research. (1-6) 
Institution Administration 

I ADM 410 School Food Service. (3) Two 

lectures and one morning a week for 
field experience in a school food service. 
Prerequisite, FOOD 200, or 240 and 250, 
and NUTR 300, or consent of instructor. 
Study of organization and management, 
menu planning, food purchasing, 
preparation, service, and cost control in a 
school lunch program. 

lADM 420 Quantity Food Purchasing. (2) 

Prerequisites: FOOD 240 and lADlVl 300, 
or consent of instructor. Food selection 
and the development of integrated pur- 
chasing programs. Standards of quality; 
marketing distribution systems. 

lADM 430 Quantity Food Production. (4) 

Two hours of lecture and one six-hour 
laboratory a week. Prerequisites; FOOD 
240 and lADM 300, or consent of instruc- 
tor. Scientific principles and procedures. 
Laboratory experience in management 
techniques and in quantity food produc- 
tion and service. 

lADM 440 Food Service Personnel Ad- 
ministration. (2) Prerequisite, lADM 300. 
Principles of personnel administration in 
food services, emphasis on personnel 
selection, supervision and training, job 
evaluation, wage and payroll structure, 
current labor regulations, and interper- 
sonal relationships and communications. 

lADM 450 Food Service Equipment and 
Planning. (2) Two lectures a week. Prereq- 
uisite, consent of instructor. Equipment 



design selection, maintenance and effi- 
cient layout, relation of the physical 
facility to production and service. 

lADM 460 Administrative Dietetics I. (3) 

Open only to students accepted into and 
participating in the U.S. army dietetic in- 
ternship program at Walter Reed General 
Hospital or the coordinated undergradu- 
ate dietetic program. Application of 
management theory through guided ex- 
perience in all aspects of hospital dietary 
department administration. For students 
in the coordinated undergraduate dietet- 
ics program, 238 hours of hospital food 
service management experience is re- 
quired and this course must be accom- 
panied by lADM 300 and 430. 

lADM 470 / dministrative Dietetics II. (3) 

Open only ;o students accepted into and 
participating in the U.S. army dietetic in- 
ternship program at Walter Reed General 
Hospital or the coordinated undergradu- 
ate dietetics program. Continuation of 
lADM 460. For students in the coor- 
dinated undergraduate program, 238 
hours of food service experience is re- 
quired and this course must be accom- 
panied by lADM 420 and 440. 

lADM 490 Special Problems in Food Ser- 
vice. (2-3) Prerequisites, senior standing, 
five hours in lADM courses and consent 
of instructor. Individual selected prob- 
lems in the area of food service. 

lADM 498 Special Topics. (1-3) Prereq- 
uisites, consent of instructor. Selected 
current aspects of institution administra- 
tion. Repeatable to a maximum of six 
credits if the subject matter is substan- 
tially different. 

lADM 600 Food Service Administration. 

(3) First or second semester. Principles 
of organization and management related 
to a food system. Control of resources 
through the use of quantitative methods. 
Administrative decision-making, and per- 
sonnel policies and practices. 

lADM 610 Readings in Food Administra- 
tion. (3) Reports and discussion of 
significant research and development in 
the area of food administration. 

lADM 630 Computer Application in Food 
Service. (3) Alternate years. Prerequisite: 
lADM 600 or equivalent. The use of 
automatic data processing and program- 
ming for the procurement and issuing of 
food commodities, processing of ingre- 
dients, menu selection, and labor alloca- 
tions. 

lADM 640 Sanitation and Safety in Food 
Service. (3) Alternate years. Prerequisite, 
MICB 200. Principles and practices of 
sanitation and safety unique to the pro- 
duction, storage and service of food in 
quantity: includes current legislation. 

lADM 650 Experimental Quantity Food 
Production. (3) Alternate years. Two lec- 
tures and one three-hour laboratory. Pre- 
requisites: lADM 430 and FOOD 450 or 
equivalents. Application of experimental 
methods to quantity food production, 
recipe development and modification: 
relationship of food quality to production 
methods. 



lADM 660 Research Methods. (3) Prereq- 
uisite: A statistics course. A study of ap- 
propriate research methodology and 
theories including experimental design. 
Each student is required to develop a 
research proposal. 

lADM 678 Special Topics in Institutional 
Food. (1-6) Individual or group study in an 
area of institutional food service. 

lADM 688 Seminar. (1) Reports and 
discussion of current research in institu- 
tion administration. tVlay be repeated to a 
maximum of three semester hours of 
credit. 

lADM 799 Master's Thesis Research. (1-6) 

First and second semesters. Credit in 
proportion to work done and results ac- 
complished. Investigation in some 
phases -"f institution administration 
which may form the basis of a thesis. 



Food Science Program 

Professor and Chairman: King (Dairy 
Science) 

Professors: Bender (Agricultural and Re- 
source Economics), Young (Animal 
Science), Keeney (Chemistry), Davis 
and Mattick (Dairy Science), Kramer, 
Twigg and Wiley (Horticulture) 

Associate Professors: Wheaton (Agri- 
cultural Engineering), Buric (Animal 
Science), Westhoff (Dairy Science), 
Bigbee, Heath and Thomas (Poultry 
Science) 

Assistant Professors: Vijay (Dairy 
Science), Solomos (Horticulure) 

Visting Lecturer: Bednarczyk 

The Food Science Program offers 
the Master of Science and Doctor of 
Philosophy degrees. The Program Is 
interdepartmental with participation 
or support from the Departments of 
Animal Science, Dairy Science, Hor- 
ticulture, Poultry Science, 
Agricultural Engineering, Chemistry, 
and Agricultural and Resource 
Economics. Programs of study and 
research are individually planned 
with the student and an appropriate 
committee. Areas of study encom- 
pass animal, plant, seafood, and 
fabricated food products. Specializa- 
tion is available in food microbiology 
and fermentations, food chemistry 
and biochemistry, quality assurance, 
food engineering and product 
development, nutritional evaluation, 
food sanitation, packaging, and 
distribution. 

Admission and Degree Information 

There are no special admission re- 
quirements above those required by 
the Graduate School. The Food 
Science Admissions Committee 
evaluates and makes recommenda- 

Graduate Programs / 109 



tions on all applications based on 
academic and professional ex- 
perience and letters of recommenda- 
tions (at least 3 required). When 
feasible the Committee may conduct 
a personal interview. In the absence 
of a bachelors degree in Food 
Science or Food Technology a 
strong background in physical and 
biological sciences is recom- 
mended. Inadequate prerequisites 
may result in a recommendation to 
complete a remedial program as a 
special student, undergraduate 
status. Program requirements are as 
follows: 1) Food Science; the 
equivalent of the following courses 
FDSC 412, 413, Principles of Food 
Processing; FDSC 421, Food 
Chemistry; FDSC 430, Food 
fVlicrobiology; FDSC 431, Food Quali- 
ty Control. 2) Biochemistry — 
minimum of 3 hours graduate credit. 
3) Colloquium (seminar). Attendance 
each semester and at least 2 presen- 
tations for credit during the program 
of study. 4) Provisional requirements 
based on admission must be 
satisfied as soon as practical. 

For the M.S. degree, a student 
must complete the program of study 
as approved by his committee which 
will include the minimum require- 
ments. Students entering the Pro- 
gram without a background in Food 
Science will probably complete 
about 30 hours of course work to ob- 
tain the M.S. degree. For the M.S. 
with thesis, a research proposal 
must be submitted to the student's 
committee for review and approval 
by the end of the second semester 
of study. Students who for various 
reaons or circumstances cannot 
readily satisfy the thesis research 
may complete an additional 6 hours 
of courses at the 600 level in addi- 
tion to the program requirements 
above. A scholarly paper on a sub- 
ject approved by the committee 
must be prepared and presented at a 
regular FDSC colloquium. A final 
comprehensive examination in- 
cluding defense of the scholarly 
paper will be conducted by the 
student's committee. The above pro- 
grams should be completed within 3 
semesters and a summer session. 

For admission to the doctoral pro- 
gram, the M.S. degree is not required 
but is generally recommended. 
Students completing an M.S. degree 
in the FDSC Program, UMCP must 

110/ Graduate Programs 



receive a favorable recommen- 
dation from the M.S. degree final ex- 
amining committee. Students admit- 
ted from outside the FDSC Program, 
UMCP will be examined orally by 
their committee as a basis for 
developing a suitable program of 
study. The student must complete a 
program of study as approved by the 
student's committee including 
minimum requirements of the 
Graduate School and FDSC Program 
requirements. There is no required 
number of hours of course work. 
Programs are developed on an in- 
dividual basis. There is no language 
requirement. A proposal for disserta- 
tion research must be presented to 
the student's committee for review 
and approval by the end of the third 
semester of study. A comprehensive 
oral examination will be conducted 
by the committee and other in- 
terested faculty members after 
substantial completion of the pro- 
gram of study and usually before the 
end of the fourth semester. Satisfac- 
tory performance in this examination 
is required before recommendation 
for admission to candidacy is 
granted. Each student will assist in 
teaching at least one course 
regardless of whether employed as a 
graduate assistant. The candidate 
will defend the dissertation before a 
committee of at least 5 members ap- 
pointed by the Dean for Graduate 
Studies. The candidate's advisor is 
usually chairman of the committee. 
It is recommended that the can- 
didate prepare initial drafts of in- 
tended publications for review 
before the final examination. This 
program should be completed in 3 
years or less depending on the can- 
didate's previous background. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

The combined resources of the par- 
ticipating Departments are available 
for Food Science research. 
Laboratories, pilot plants, and equip- 
ment are located in the Animal 
Sciences Center, Holzapfel Hall, 
Turner Laboratory and Shriver Hall. 
Facilities are available for the ex- 
perimental processing of fruits, 
vegetables, poultry, red meat, and 
dairy products. A seafood process- 
ing facility is located off campus. 
Laboratories are equipped for micro- 
biological, biochemical, biophysical, 
and engineering research including 



facilities for laboratory animals. In- 
strumentation includes gas-liquid 
chromatographs, atomic absorption 
spectrophotometers, electron 
microscope, radioisotope counters, 
amino acid analyzer, ultra-centrifuge, 
fermenters, and controlled environ- 
ment incubator. University research 
farms are available for both plant 
and animal production studies. 
Specialized facilities of nearby 
government and food industry 
laboratories are regularly made 
available for graduate student 
research. The National Agricultural 
Library is about 3 miles from the 
campus. The FDSC Program has an 
exchange agreement with the Food 
Science Department of the Central 
University of Venezuela for graduate 
study and research. 

Financial Assistance 

Teaching and research assistant- 
ships are made available by the par- 
ticipating Departments. Financial 
support is also available from con- 
tracts and grants and by special ar- 
rangements with several nearby 
government laboratories. 

Additional Information 

A detailed brochure, "Graduate 
Study in Food Science," is available 
in the Program Office and can be ob- 
tained by contacting: Dr. R. L. King, 
Coordinator and Chairman, Food 
Science Program, Animal Sciences 
Center, University of Maryland. 
Telephone #: 301-454-3928. 

Courses 

FDSC 412 Principles of Food Processing 

I. (3) Two lectures and one laboratory per 
week. A study of the basic methods by 
which foods are preserved (unit opera- 
tions). Effect of raw product quality and 
the various types of processes on yield 
and quality of the preserved products. 

FDSC 413 Principles of Food Processing 

II. (3) Three lectures per week. A detailed 
study of food processing with emphasis 
on line and staff operations, including 
physical facilities, utilities, pre-and post- 
processing operations, processing line 
development and sanitation. 

FDSC 421 Food Chemistry. (3) Three lec- 
tures per week. Prerequisites: CHEM 203 
and 204. The application of basic 
chemical and physical concepts to the 
composition and properties of foods. 
Emphasis on the relationship of process- 
ing technology, to the keeping quality, 
nutritional value, and acceptability of 
foods. 

FDSC 422 Food Product Research and 
Development. (3) Two lectures, and one 
laboratory per week. Prerequisites, FDSC 



413. CHEM 461. or permission of instruc- 
tor. A study of the research and develop- 
ment function for improvement of ex- 
isting products and development of new, 
economically feasible and marketable 
food products. Application of chemical- 
physical characteristics of ingredients to 
produce optimum quality products, cost 
reduction, consumer evaluation, equip- 
ment and package development. 

FDSC 423 Food Chemistry Laboratory. (2) 

Pre- or corequisite: FDSC 421. Two 
laboratories per week. Analysis of the 
major and minor constituents of food us- 
ing chemical, physical and instrumental 
methods in concordance with current 
food industry and regulatory practices. 
Laboratory exercises coincide lecture 
subjects in FDSC 421. 

FDSC 430 Food Microbiology. (2) Two 

lectures per week. Prerequisite: MICB 
200 or equivalent. A study of micro- 
organisms of major importance to the 
food industry with emphasis on food- 
borne Outbreaks, public health signifi- 
cance, bioprocessing of foods and con- 
trol of microbial spoilage of foods. 

FDSC 431 Food Qualify Control. (4) Three 
lectures and one laboratory per week. 
Definition and organization of the quality 
control function in the food industry: 
preparation of specifications: statistical 
methods for acceptance sampling; in- 
plant and processed product inspection. 
Instrumental and sensory methods for 
evaluating sensory quality, identity and 
wholesomeness and their integration in- 
to grades and standards of quality. 

FDSC 434 Food Microbiology Laboratory. 

(2) Two laboratories per week. Pre- or co- 
requisite: FDSC 430. A study of tech- 
niques and procedures used in the 
microbiological examination of foods. 

FDSC 442 Horticultural Products Pro- 
cessing. (3) Two lectures and one 
laboratory per week. Commercial 
methods of canning, freezing, 
dehydrating, fermenting, and chemical 
pereservation of fruit and vegetable 
crops. 

FDSC 451 Dairy Products Processing. (3) 

Two lectures and one laboratory per 
week. Method of production of fluid milk, 
butter, cheese, condensed and 
evaporated milk and milk products and 
ice cream. 

FDSC 461 Technology of Market Eggs 
and Poultry. (3) Two lectures and one 
laboratory per week. A study of the tech- 
nological factors concerned with the pro- 
cessing, storage, and marketing of eggs 
and poultry and the factors affecting 
their quality. 

FDSC 471 Meat and Meat Processing. (3) 

Two lectures and one laboratory a week. 
Prerequisite. CHEM 461 or permission of 
instructor. Physical and chemical char- 
acteristics of meat and meat products, 
meat processing, methods of testing and 
product development. 



FDSC 482 Seafood Products Processing. 

(3) Two lectures and one laboratory a 
week. Prerequisite. CHEM 461 or permis- 
sion of instructor. The principal preserva- 
tion methods for commercial seafood 
products with particular reference to the 
invertebrates. Chemical and microbiolog- 
ical aspects of processing are em- 
phasized. 

FDSC 621 Systems Analysis in the Food 
Industry. (3) Construction and solution of 
models for optimizing feed, product for- 
mulations, nutrient-palatability costs. 
Methods for optimizing processes, inven- 
tories, and transportation systems. 

FDSC 631 Advanced Food Microbiology. 

(2) One lecture and one laboratory period 
a week. Prerequisite. FDSC 430 or per- 
mission of instructor. An in depth under- 
standing and working knowledge of a 
selected number of problem areas and 
contemporary topics in food micro- 
biology. 

FDSC 689 Seminar in Food Science. (1-3) 
A — Lipids 
B — Proteins 
C — Carbohydrates 
D — Organoleptic Properties 
E — Fermentation 
F — Enzymes and Microorganisms 
G — Flavor Analysis 
I — Assays 

Studies in depth of selected phases of 
food science are frequently best ar- 
ranged by employment if a lecturer from 
outside the university to teach a specific 
phase. Flexibility in the credit offered 
permits adjustment to the nature of the 
course. 

FDSC 698 Colloquium in Food Science. 

(1) First and second semester. Oral 
reports on special topics or recently 
published research in food science and 
technology. Distinguished scientists are 
invited as guest lecturers. A maximum of 
three credits allowed for the M.S. 

FDSC 699 Special Problems in Food 
Science. (1-4) First and second 
semesters. Prerequisite CHEM 461 or 
permission of instructor. Credit accord- 
ing to time scheduled and magnitude of 
problem. An experimental program on a 
topic other than the student's thesis 
problem will be conducted. Four credits 
shall be the maximum allowed toward an 
advanced degree. 

FDSC 799 Master's Thesis Research. (1-6) 

FDSC 811 Advances in Food Technology. 

(3) First semester, alternate years. Pre- 
requisite. CHEM 461 or permission of in- 
structor. A systematic review of new 
products, processes and management 
practices in the food industry. 

FDSC 899 Doctoral Dissertation Re- 
search. (1-8) 



French Language and 
Literature Program 

Professor ana Cnairman Thernen 
Professors: Bingham. MacBain. Rosenfield 
Associate Professors: Demaitre. Fink. Hall. 

Tanca 
Assistant Professors: Campagna. Hicks. 

Meijer. Russell 

The Department of French and Italian 
prepares students for the MA. and Ph.D. 
degrees in French language and litera- 
ture. The composition of the Graduate 
faculty and the variety of course offer- 
ings make it possible for students to 
specialize in any penod or movement of 
French literature or any aspect of the 
French language, with the consent of 
their advisers. 

Admission and Degree Information 

Entry into the M.A. program is open to 
students having a solid grounding in 
French language and literature. All appli- 
cants, whether graduates of the Univer- 
sity of Maryland or not. must take all 
parts of the G R.E.. including the Ad- 
vanced Examination in French. 

In addition to evidence of indepen- 
dent scholarly research in the form of a 
thesis (thesis option) or seminar papers 
(non-thesis option), successful comple- 
tion of the MA. program involves pass- 
ing a comprehensive examination in 
three parts: the Graduate Language Pro- 
ficiency Examination (translation into 
and from French): a six-hour examina- 
tion in French literature from the Middle 
Ages to the present (a reading knowl- 
edge of Old French will be supposed): 
and a one hour oral examination in 
French literature from the Middle Ages 
to the present. The M.A. program is gen- 
erally completed in four semesters, or 
less if Summer Session offenngs are 
utilized. 

Entry into the Ph.D. program is open 
to the most highly qualified and most 
highly motivated candidates, who can 
show that individual research is their 
major interest and who give evidence 
of strong qualifications to pursue that 
interest. 

All applicants for the Ph.D. program 
(except M.A. graduates of this Depart- 
ment) must pass a three-part prelim- 
inary examination administered at the 
start of the Fall semester, consisting of 
an explication de texte. an essay and 
an oral examination, before being fully 
admitted to the program. They are then 
required to complete a program of semi- 
nars related to their field of interest and 
to pass five Special Topic examinations 

Graduate Programs /111 



and a Foreign Language translation 
examination before being admitted to 
candidacy and beginning work on ttieir 
dissertation. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

In addition to the University graduate 
and undergraduate libraries, the Depart- 
ment maintains a reference library. Area 
research facilities include the Library of 
Congress and the Folger Library (special- 
izing in 16th and 18th-century literature). 

Financial Assistance 

Financial support is available in the form 
of assistantships and fellowships; for 
information contact the Department of 
French and Italian. 

Additional Information 

For complete information concerning 
the Department's requirements, set 
forth in the Guide to Graduate Pro- 
grams in French, write to the Depart- 
ment of French and Italian Language 
and Literature. 

Courses 

FREN 400 Applied Linguistics. (3) The na- 
ture of applied linguistics and Its contribution 
to the effective teaching of foreign languages. 
Comparative study of English and French, 
with emphasis upon points of divergence. An- 
alysis, evaluation and construction of related 
dnils. 

FREN 401 Introduction to Stylistics. (3) 

Prerequisite, FREN 302, or course chairman's 
consent. Comparative stylistic analysis; de- 
tailed grammatical analysis; translation. 

FREN 404 Oral Practice for Teachers of 
French. (3) Prerequisites. FREN 31 1 and 
FREN 312, or consent of the Instructor. De- 
velopment of fluency In French, stress on cor- 
rect sentence structure and Idiomatic ex- 
pression. Credit may not be applied toward 
the French major. 

FREN 405 Explication de Textes. (3) Oral 
and written analysis of short literary works, or 
of excerpts from longer works chosen for their 
historical, structural, or stylistic interest, with 
the purpose of training the major to under- 
stand literature in depth and to make mature 
esthetic evaluations of it. 

FREN 41 1 Introduction to Medieval Litera- 
ture. (3) French literature from the ninth 
through the fifteenth century. LaChanson Epique, 
Le Roman Courtois, Le Lai; La LItterature 
Bourgeoise, Le Theatre, La Poesle Lyrique 

FREN 412 Introduction to Medieval Litera- 
ture. (3) French literature from the ninth 
through the fifteenth century. La Chason Epique. 
Le Roman Courtois, Le Lai; La LItterature 
Bourgeoise, Le Theatre, La Poesle Lyrique 

FREN 421 French Literature of the Sixteenth 
Century. (3) The Renaissance in France: 
Humanism. Rabelais, Calvin, the Pleiade, 
Montaigne, Baroque poetry. 

FREN 422 French Literature of the Six- 
teenth Century. (3) The Renaissance in 

112 / Graduate Programs 



France: Humanism, Rabelais, Calvin, the 
Pleiade. Motaigne, Baroque Poetry. 

FREN 431 French Literature of the Seven- 
teenth Century. (3) Descartes, Pascal, 
Comeille, Racine; the remaining great classi- 
cal writers, with special attention to Moliere. 

FREN 432 French Literature of the Seven- 
teenth Century. (3) Descartes. Pascal, 
Corneille, Racine; the remaining great classi- 
cal writers, with special attention to (VIoliere. 

FREN 441 French Literature of the Eigh- 
teenth Century. (3) Development of philo- 
sophical and scientific movement; Montesquieu, 
Voltaire, Diderot, Rousseau. 

FREN 442 French Literature of the Eigh- 
teenth Century. (3) Development of philo- 
sophical and scientific movement; Montesquieu, 
Voltaire, Diderot, Rousseau. 

FREN 451 French Literature of the Nine- 
teenth Century. (3) Drama and poetry from 
Romanticism to Symbolism: the major prose 
writers of the same penod. 

FREN 452 French Literature of the Nine- 
teenth Century. (3) Drama and poetry from 
Romanticism to Symbolism; the major prose 
writers of the same period. 

FREN 461 Studies in Twentieth Century 
Literature-The Early Years. (3) French 
poetry, theater and the novel during the age 
of Proust and GIde. 

FREN 462 Studies in Twentieth Century 
Literature - Mid-Century Writers. (3) Mod- 
ern French poetry, theater and the novel, with 
special emphasis on the Literature of Anxiety 
and Existentialism. 

FREN 463 Studies in Twentieth Century 
Literature - The Contemporary Scene. (3) 

French writers and literary movements since 
about 1950, with special emphasis on new 
forms of the novel and theater. 

FREN 471 French Civilization I. (3) French 
life, customs, culture, traditions (800-1750). 

FREN 472 French Civilization II. (3) French 
life, customs, culture, traditions (1750 — 
present day France). 

FREN 478 Themes and Movements of 
French Literature in Translation. (3) Stud- 
ies treatments of thematic problems or of liter- 
ary or historical movements in French litera- 
ture. Topic to be determined each semester. 
Given in English 

FREN 479 Masterworks of French Litera- 
ture in Translation. (3) Treats the works 
of one or more major French wnters. Topic to 
be determined each semester. Given In English. 

FREN 488 Pro-Seminar in a Great Literary 
Figure. (3) Each semester a specialized 
study will be made of one great French wnter 
chosen from some representative literary pe- 
riod or movement since the middle ages. Re- 
peatable for a maximum of six credits. 

FREN 489 Pro-Seminar in Themes or 
Movements of French Literature. (3) Re- 

peatable for a maximum of six credits. 

FREN 491 Honors Reading Course, 
Poetry. (3) 

H - Honors, Poetry. 

Supervised readings to be taken normally 
only by students admitted to the Honors pro- 
gram. 



FREN 492 Honors Reading Course, Novel. 
(3) 

H - Honors, Novel 

Supervised readings to be taken normally 
only by students admitted to the Honors pro- 
gram. 

FREN 493 Honors Reading Course Drama. 

(3) 

H - Honors, Drama. 

Supervised readings to be taken normally 
only by students admitted to the Honors pro- 
gram. 

FREN 494 Honors Independent Study. (3) 

H - Honors. 

Honors Independent study involves guided 
readings based on an honors reading list and 
tested by a 6 hour written examination. Honors 
494 and 495 are required to fulfill the depart- 
mental honors requirement In addlton to two 
out of the following. 491 H, 492H, 493H. Open 
only to students admitted to the departmental 
Honors program. 

FREN 495 Honors Thesis Research. (3) 

Honors thesis research Involves the writing of 
a paper under the direction of a professor 
In this department and an oral examination. 
Honors 494 and 495 are required to fulfill the 
departmental honors requirement In addition 
to two out of the following, 491 H, 492H, 493H. 
Open only to students admitted to the depart- 
mental Honors program. 

FREN 498 Special Topics in French Litera- 
ture. (3) Repeatable for a maximum of six 
credits. 

FREN 499 Special Topics in French Stud- 
ies. (3) An aspect of French studies, the specific 
topic to be announced each time the course 
IS offered. Repeatable for a maximum of 6 
credits. 

FREN 600 Problems in Bibliography and 
Research Methods. (3) 

FREN 601 The History of the French 
Language. (3) 

FREN 602 Comparative Romance Linguis- 
tics. (3) Also listed as SPAN 612. 

FREN 603 Stylistics. (3) Advanced composi- 
tion, translation, stylistic analysis. 

FREN 609 Special Topic in the French 
Language. (3) 

FREN 610 La Chanson Oe Roland. (3) Close 
reading of the text, study of epic formulae and 
early medieval literary techniques; reading 
knowledge of Old French desirable. 

FREN 619 Special Topic in Medieval French 
Literature. (3) 

FREN 629 Special Topic in Sixteenth 
Century French Literature. (3) 

FREN 630 Corneille. (3) 

FREN 631 Moliere. (3) 

FREN 632 Racine. (3) 

FREN 639 Special Topic in Seventeenth 
Century French Literature. (3) 

FREN 640 Voltaire. (3) 

FREN 641 Rousseau. (3) 

FREN 642 Diderot. (3) 



FREN 649 Special Topic in Eighteenth 
Century French Literature. (3) 

FREN 650 French Poetry in the Nineteenth 
Century. (3) 

FREN 651 French Poetry in the Nineteenth 
Century. (3) 

FREN 652 The French Novel in the Nine- 
teenth Century. (3) 

FREN 653 The French Novel in the Nine- 
teenth Century. (3) 

FREN 659 Special Topic in Nineteenth 
Century French Literature. (3) 

FREN 660 French Poetry in the Twentieth 
Century. (3) 

FREN 662 The French Novel in the Twen- 
tieth Century. (3) 

FREN 663 The French Novel in the Twen- 
tieth Century. (3) 

FREN 664 The French Theatre in the Twen- 
tieth Century. (3) 

FREN 665 The French Theatre in the Twen- 
tieth Century. (3) 

FREN 669 Special Topic in Twentieth 
Century French Literature. (3) 

FREN 679 The History of Ideas in France. 

(3) Analysis of currents of ideas as reflected 
in different periods and auttiors of Frencfi 
literature 

FREN 689 Seminar in a Great Literary 
Figure. (3) 

FREN 699 Seminar. (3) Topic to be Deter- 
mined Each Semester. 

FREN 702 Structural French Linguistics. 

(3) Synchronic description of tfie phonology, 
morphology and syntax of modern spoken 
French: standard French in contrast with 
other vaheties. 

FREN 709 College Teaching of French. (1) 

Introduction to the teaching of French at the 
college level with particular emphasis on meth- 
odology. Seminars in theory, demonstration 
of different teaching techniques, supervised 
practice teaching, training in language labora- 
tory procedures, evaluation of instructional 
materials. Required of all graduate assistants 
in French. Repeatable to a maximum of two 
credits. 

FREN 799 Master's Thesis Research. (1-6) 

FREN 801 Independent Study. (3) Designed 
to permit doctoral candidates to work indepen- 
dently in areas of special interest to them, 
under the close supervision of a professor 
of their choice. 

FREN 802 Independent Study. (3) Designed 
to permit doctoral candidates to work indepen- 
dently in areas of special interest to them, 
under the close supervision of a professor of 
their choice. 

FREN 818 French Literary Criticism. (3) 

Analysis and evaluation of various trends in 
literary chticism as a manifestation of the 
French literary genius. Topic to be deter- 
mined each semester. 

FREN 899 Doctoral Dissertation Research. 
(1-8) 



Italian 

ITAL 410 The Italian Renaissance. (3) A 

study of major trends of thought in Renais- 
sance literature, philosophy, art, and science. 

ITAL 498 Special Topics in Italian Literature 

(3) Repeatable for a maximum of six credits 

ITAL 499 Special Topics in Italian Studies 

(3) An aspect of Italian studies, the specific 
topic to be announced each time the course 
IS offered. Repeatable for a maximum of 6 
credits. 

Geography Program 

Professor and Chairman: Harper 
Professors: Deshler, Fonaroff 
Associate Professors: Brodsky, Chaves, 

Groves, Mitchell, Thompson, WIedel 
Assistant Professors: Christian, 

Cirrincione, Garst, Muller, Petzold, 

Roswell, Thorn, Yoshioka 

The programs for both the Master of 
Arts and Doctor of Philosophy 
degrees in the Department of Geog- 
raphy are designed to provide the 
student with an opportunity for 
specialization in several areas. 

Considering particular advantages 
inherent in the College Park location 
the Department has built its gradu- 
ate program around three major 
areas of concentration and has 
assembled in each a group of faculty 
members with complementary and 
overlapping interests. The areas are: 

1) Physical geography with em- 
phasis on physical systems involv- 
ing the inter-relationships between 
landforms, climate, and other en- 
vironmental elements and their rela- 
tionship with man's activities. The 
University's meteorology program 
and Water Resources Research 
Center and work in agriculture and 
biology provide support for this pro- 
gram as do various Federal Govern- 
ment environmental programs and 
the special consortium studying 
Chesapeake Bay and its resources. 

2) A cultural-historical geography 
area, with particular attention to 
tropical settlement and resource 
utilization, health and disease, and 
various themes of historical geog- 
raphy of the Americas. This special- 
ty draws on the incomparable ar- 
chival material in the Washington 
area, in state historical agencies, 
and in Baltimore. 3) The geography 
of metropolitan areas and urban 
systems supported by affiliation 
with the University's Institute for Ur- 
ban Studies and regional and local 
planning agencies. There are partic- 
ular strengths In social aspects, land 
use and transportation, and histori- 



cal geography of urban areas. 

Individual faculty members have 
other interests that enable students 
to work on special programs such as 
human ecology, environmental prob- 
lems, medical geography, Latin 
America, Africa, and cartography. 
Students planning such programs 
should contact the Department or 
appropriate faculty member to deter- 
mine their feasibility. 
Admission and Degree Information 
While progress in the graduate pro- 
gram is largely an individual matter, 
students entering the M.A, program 
should consider a two-year program 
normal; those entering the Ph.D. 
should think of three years as the 
norm. The Department requires very 
few particular courses — students 
at both levels initiate their own pro- 
grams of coursework and submit a 
plan of study for approval. 

Incoming M.A. students are ex- 
pected to have an undergraduate de- 
gree in the field or in a closely 
related field, with substantial work in 
geography. In the latter case, 
remedial work may be required prior 
to admission to the degree program. 
All graduate applicants should sub- 
mit GRE examination results. 

Because of the degree of special- 
ization inherent in Ph.D. training, the 
Department only considers ap- 
plicants whose interests coincide 
with departmental staff competence 
— in general, the three major areas 
of geography described above. Pro- 
spective students who are unsure 
whether their interests match those 
of the Department are encouraged to 
submit a proposal for consideration. 

For admission to the doctoral pro- 
gram, the Department normally re- 
quires a grade-point average higher 
than 3.0 and an M.A. degree from a 
recognized geography department, 
or competence In terms of fields of 
study and level of achievement com- 
parable to the M.A. degree of the 
Department. 

A non M.A. — direct Ph.D. pro- 
gram is possible by petition from the 
student and upon approval of a 
faculty committee appointed by the 
Department Chairman. 

M.A. students have the choice of 
either thesis or non-thesis programs. 
The non-thesis option involves the 
preparation of two substantial 
research papers. All M.A. students 
take an oral examination defense of 



Graduate Programs / 1 13 



a research proposal prior to work on 
the thesis or papers and a final oral 
examination based either on the 
thesis or one of the two research 
papers. 

After completion of formal course- 
work requirements for the Ph.D., 
there is a two-part qualifying exami- 
nation. Part One is a written exam- 
ination in the student's two major 
fields of specialization. Part Two is 
an oral examination evaluating the 
dissertation proposal. Upon satisfac- 
tory completion of the dissertation 
there is a final oral examination. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

Departmental research facilities in- 
clude a reference library with exten- 
sive journal collection, a map collec- 
tion, and a cartographic laboratory. 
A remote computer terminal in the 
building provides direct connection 
with the University's Computer 
Science Center. The Department ex- 
pects to move into new quarters in 
1978 with expanded computation 
and laboratory facilities. Several 
faculty members have particular 
skills in quantitative methods and 
other analytical tools, and the 
Department has its own publication 
of monographs in an Occasional 
Paper series. 

Additional Information 

More detailed information on the 
M.A. and Ph.D. programs can be ob- 
tained from the Department which 
has available a booklet on the gradu- 
ate programs. 

Courses 

GEOG 400 Geography of North America. 

(3) An examination of the contemporary 
patterns of American and Canadian life 
from a regional viewpoint. Major topics 
include; the significance of the physical 
environment, resource use, the political 
framework, economic activities, demo- 
graphic and socio-cultural character- 
istics, regional identification, and 
regional problems. 

GEOG 402 Geography of Maryland and 
Adjacent Areas. (3) An analysis of the 
physical environment, natural resources, 
and population in relation to agriculture, 
industry, transport, and trade in the State 
of Maryland and adjacent areas. 

GEOG 406 Historical Geography of North 
America before 1800. (3) An analysis of 
the changing geography of the U.S. and 
Canada from pre-Columbian times to the 
end of the 18th century. Emphasis on 
areal variations and changes in the set- 
tlements and economies of Indian and 
Colonia populations. Areal specialization 

114 / Graduate Programs 



and the changing patterns of agriculture, 
industry, trade, and transportation. Popu- 
lation growth, composition and interior 
expansion. Regionalization. 

GEOG 407 Historical Geography of North 
America After 1800. (3) An analysis of the 
changing Geography of the U.S. and 
Canada from 1800 to the 1920's. Em- 
phasis on the settlement expansion and 
socio-economic development of the U.S., 
and comparisons with Canadian ex- 
perience. Immigration, economic ac- 
tivities, industrialization, transportation 
and urbanization. 

GEOG 410 Geography of Europe. (3) Agri- 
cultural and industrial development of 
Europe and present-day problems in rela- 
tion to the physical and cultural setting 
of the continent and its natural re- 
sources. 

GEOG 411 Historical Geography of 
Europe after 1500. (3) An analysis of the 
changing Geography of Europe from the 
Columbian discoveries until the early 
20th century with particular emphasis on 
Western Europe, the medieval legacy, the 
impact of overseas expansion, and 
changing patterns of population, agri- 
culture, industry, trade, and transporta- 
tion. Attention to the development of the 
nation-state and to agricultural and in- 
dustrial revolutions. 

GEOG 415 Economic Resources and 
Development of Africa. (3) The natural 
resources of Africa in relation to agri- 
cultural and mineral production; the 
various stages of economic development 
and the potentialities of the future. 
GEOG 420 Geography of Asia. (3) Lands, 
climates, natural resources, and major 
economic acitivities in Asia (except 
Soviet Asia). Outstanding differences be- 
tween major regions. 

GEOG 421 Economic and Political 
Geography of Eastern Asia. (3) Study of 
China, Korea, Japan, the Philippines; 
physical geographic setting, population, 
economic and political geography. 
Potentialities of major regions and recent 
developments. 

GEOG 422 Cultural Geography of China 
and Japan. (3) Survey of geographical 
distribution and interpretation of cultural 
patterns of China and Japan. Emphasis 
on basic cultural institutions, outlook on 
life, unique characteristics of various 
groups. Trends of cultural change and 
contemporary problems. 

GEOG 423 Economic and Political 
Geography of South and Southeast Asia. 

(3) Study of the Indian subcontinent. Far- 
ther India, Indonesia; physical 
geographic setting, population, 
economic and political geography. 
Potentialities of various countries and 
regions and their role in present Asia. 

GEOG 431 Economic and Cultural 
Geography of Caribbean America. (3) An 

analysis of the physical framework, 
broad economic and historical trends, 
cultural patterns, and regional diversifi- 
cation of Mexico, Central America, the 
West Indies. 



GEOG 432 Economic and Cultural 
Geography of South America. (3) A 

survey of natural environment and 
resources, economic development and 
cultural diversity of the South American 
Republics, with emphasis upon problems 
and prospects of the countries. 

GEOG 434 Historical Geography of the 
Hispanic World. (3) An examination of 
the social, economic, political and 
cultural geography of the countries of 
the Iberian peninsula and Latin America 
in the past with concentration on 
specific time periods of special 
significance in the development of these 
countries. 

GEOG 435 Geography of the Soviet 
Union. (3) The natural environment and 
its regional diversity. Geographical fac- 
tors in the expansion of the Russian 
State. The geography of agricultural and 
industrial production in relation to avail- 
able resources, transportation problems, 
and diversity of population. 

GEOG 437 Introduction to Regional 
Methods. (3) Inquiry into the evolution of 
regional methodology with specific 
reference to geographic problems. 
Critical analysis and evaluation of past 
and contemporary theories and a 
thorough examination of alternate 
regional methodologies. Application of 
quantitative and qualitative techniques of 
regional analysis and synthesis to tradi- 
tional and modern regional geography 
emphasizing principles of regionaliza- 
tion, 

GEOG 440 Process Geomorphology. (3) 

Study of the major processes involved in 
the development of landforms, especially 
weathering, wasting, and fluvial erosion. 
Evaluation of models of slope and land- 
scape evolution, 

GEOG 441 Geomorphological Environ- 
ment. (3) Prerequisite; GEOG 440, An ex- 
amination of environments, coastal, 
glacial, lithologic, etc, which lead to the 
spatial differentiation of landforms, 

GEOG 445 Climatology. (3) The geo- 
graphic aspects of climate with em- 
phasis on energy-moisture budgets, 
steady-state and non-steady-state clima- 
tology, and climatic variations at both 
macro and micro-scales, 

GEOG 446 Systematic and Regional 
Climatology. (3) Prerequisite, GEOG 445, 
or permission of instructor. Methodology 
and techniques of collecting and 
evaluating climatological information. A 
critical examination of climatic classifi- 
cations. Distribution of world climates 
and their geographical implications, 

GEOG 450 Cultural Geography. (3) Pre- 
requisite, GEOG 201 , 202, or consent of 
instructor. An analysis of the impact of 
man through his ideas and technology 
on the evolution of geographic land- 
scapes. Major themes in the relation- 
ships between cultures and environ- 
ments. 

GEOG 451 Political Geography. (3) 
Geographical factors in national power 
and international relations; an analysis of 



the role of 'geopolitics' and 'geo- 
strategy,' with special reference to the 
current world scene. 

GEOG 452 Cultural Ecology. (3) Basic 
issues concerning the natural history of 
man from the perspective of the geogra- 
pher. Basic components of selected 
behavioral and natural systems their 
evolution and adaptation, and survival 
strategies. 

GEOG 453 Population Geography. (3) Pre- 
requisite; GEOG 202 or consent of in- 
structor. Emphasis on the spatial charac- 
teristics of population distribution and 
growth, migration, fertility and mortality 
from a global perspective. Basic 
population-environmental relationships; 
carrying capacity, density, relationships 
to national development. 

GEOG 455 Urban Geography. (3) Origins 
of cities, followed by a study of elements 
of site and location with reference to 
cities. The patterns and functions of 
some major world cities will be analyzed. 
Theories of land use differentiation 
within cities will be appraised. 

GEOG 456 The Social Geography of 
Metropolitan Areas. (3) A socio-spatial 
approach to man's interaction with his 
urban environment; the ways people 
perceive, define, behave in, and structure 
their cities and metropolitan areas. 
Spatial patterns of social activities as 
formed by the distribution and inter- 
action of people and social institutions. 

GEOG 457 Historical Geography of 
Cities. (3) The course is concerned with 
the urbanization of the United States and 
Canada prior to 1920. Both the evolution 
of the urban system across the countries 
and the spatial distribution of activities 
within cities will be considered. Special 
attention is given to the process of in- 
dustrialization and the concurrent struc- 
turing of residential patterns among 
ethnic groups. 

GEOG 459 Proseminar in Urban 
Geography. (3) A problems-oriented 
course for students with a background in 
urban geography using a discussion/ 
lecture format. It will focus on a partic- 
ular sub-field within urban geography 
each time it is taught taking advantage of 
the special interests of the instructor. 

GEOG 460 Advanced Economic Geogra- 
phy I — Agricultural Resources. (3) Pre- 
requisite, GEOG 201 or 203. The nature 
of agricultural resources, the major types 
of agricultural exploitation in the world 
and the geographic conditions. Main 
problems of conservation. 

GEOG 461 Geographic Aspects of En- 
vironmental Quality. (3) Prerequisite: 
GEOG 202 or consent of instructor. Basic 
issues of human — environment interac- 
tions. Reactions of natural systems to 
human intervention. Examination of the 
geographic characteristics of environ- 
mental disruptions. 

GEOG 462 Water Resources and Water 
Resource Planning. (3) GEOG 201 or 203, 
or permission of instructor. Water as a 
component of the human environment. A 



systematic examination of various 
aspects of water, including problems of 
domestic and industrial water supply, ir- 
rigation, hydroelectric power, fisheries, 
navigation, flood damage reduction and 
recreation. 

GEOG 463 Geographic Aspects of Pollu- 
tion. (3) The impact of man on his en- 
vironment and resultant problems. Ex- 
amination of the spatial aspects of 
physical and socio-economic factors in 
air, water, and land pollution. 

GEOG 465 Geography of Transportation. 

(3) The distribution of transport routes on 
the earth's surface, patterns of transport 
routes, the adjustment of transport 
routes and media to conditions of the 
natural environment, population centers 
and their distribution. 

GEOG 466 Industrial Localization. (3) 

Factors and trends in the geographic 
distribution of the manufacturing in- 
dustries of the world, analyzed with 
reference to theories of industrial loca- 
tion. 

GEOG 470 History and Theory of Car- 
tography. (3) The development of maps 
throughout history. Geographical orienta- 
tion, coordinates and map scales. Map 
projections, their nature, use and limita- 
tions. Principles of representation of 
features on physical and cultural maps. 
Modern uses of maps and relationships 
between characteristics of maps and use 
types. 

GEOG 471 Cartography and Graphics 
Pracficum. (3) 

GEOG 472 Problems of Cartographic 
Representation and Procedure. (3) Two 

hours lecture and two hours laboratory a 
week. Study of cartographic compilation 
methods. Principles and problems of 
symbolization, classification and 
representation of map data. Problems of 
representation of features at different 
scales and for different purposes. Place- 
name selection and lettering, stick-up 
and map composition. 

GEOG 473 Problems of ft/lap Evaluation. 

(3) Two hours lecture and two hours 
laboratory a week. Schools of topo- 
graphic concepts and practices. Theoret- 
ical and practical means of determining 
map reliability, amp utility, and source 
materials. Nature, status and problems 
of topographic mapping in different parts 
of the world. Non-topographic special 
use maps. Criteria of usefulness for pur- 
poses concerned and of reliability. 

GEOG 490 Geographic Concepts and 
Source Materials. (3) A comprehensive 
and systematic survey of geographic 
concepts designed exclusively for 
teachers. Stress will be placed upon the 
philosophy of geography in relation to 
the social and physical sciences, the use 
of the primary tools of geography, source 
materials, and the problems of present- 
ing geographic principles. 

GEOG 498 Topical Investigations. (1-3) In- 
dependent study under individual 
guidance. Restricted to advanced under- 
graduate students with credit for at least 



24 hours in geography and to graduate 
students. Any exception should have the 
approval of the head of the department. 

GEOG 499 Undergraduate Research. (3) 

Directed regional or systematic study in- 
volving several subfields of geography, 
including cartographic presentation, and 
usually requiring field work, and leading 
to an undergraduate thesis. 

GEOG 600 Introduction to Graduate 
Study in Geography. (3) Introduces the 
student both to research procedures 
needed in graduate work and to current 
trends and developments in geographic 
research. Lectures by various staff 
members form basis for discussion. 
Research paper required. 

GEOG 601 Field Course. (3) 

GEOG 605 Quantitative Spatial Analysis. 

(3) This course will provide students with 
a working knowledge of various tools of 
multivariate analysis in the context of 
scientific geographic methodology rather 
than from the statistical theory view- 
point. Emphasis is on the application of 
statistical tools and a working knowl- 
edge of them will be a basis for evalua- 
tion of professional literature in the 
various fields of geography using quanti- 
tative techniques. Students should gain a 
background suitable for using the tech- 
niques in research. 

GEOG 610 Seminar in Geographic 
Methodology. (3) The seminar will em- 
phasize an intensive survey of the basic 
concepts of geography, a critical evalua- 
tion of major approaches to the study of 
geography, and a detailed analysis of the 
principal methodological problems both 
theoretical and practical confronting 
geography today. 

GEOG 615 Geomorphology. (3) 

GEOG 618 Seminar in Geomorphology. 

(3) Study and discussion of empirical and 
theoretical research methods applied to 
geomorphological problems including 
review of pertinent literature. 

GEOG 625 Advanced General Clima- 
tology. (3) First semester. Prerequisite, 
GEOG 260 or consent of instructor. Ad- 
vanced study of elements and controls of 
the earth's climates. Principles of 
climatic classification. Special analysis 
of certain climatic types. 

GEOG 626 Applied Climatology. (3) Sec- 
ond semester. Prerequisite, consent of 
instructor. Study of principles, tech- 
niques, and data of micro-climatology, 
physical and regional climatology 
relating to such problems and fields as 
transportation, agriculture, industry, ur- 
ban planning, human comfort, and 
regional geographic analysis. 

GEOG 628 Seminar in Meteorology and 
Climatology. (3) Prerequisite: consent of 
instructor. Selected topics in meteorol- 
ogy and climatology chosen to fit the in- 
dividual needs of advanced students. 
Repeatable to a maximum of six credits. 

GEOG 638 Seminar in Physical Geogra- 
phy. (3) Prerequisite: consent of instruc- 
tor. An examination of themes and prob- 



Graduate Programs / 115 



lems in the field ot physical geography. 
Repeatable to a maximum of six credits. 

GEOG 640 Theory and Practice in 
Cultural Geography. (3) An introductory 
survey of the basic structure and recent 
trends in the field of cultural geography. 
Emphasis on theoretical principles and 
analytical procedures employed in in- 
vestigating cultural problems and on 
literature which has resulted from this 
research. 

GEOG 648 Seminar in Cultural Geogra- 
phy. (3) Prerequisite: GEOG 450 or con- 
sent of instructor. An examination of 
themes and problems in the field of 
economic geography. Repeatable to a 
maximum of six credits. 

GEOG 655 Theory and Method in 
Historical Geography. (3) The philo- 
sophical and methodological issues 
associated with historical approaches to 
human geography. Introduction to the 
use and interpretation of sources for the 
study of the North American past. Em- 
phasis on Incorporation of time in 
geographic studies, on the evaluation of 
traditional approaches to past 
geographies and on present theoretical, 
analytical, and empirical procedures 
employed in historical inquiry. 

GEOG 658 Seminar in Historical Geogra- 
phy. (3) An examination of themes and 
problems in historical geography with 
reference to selected areas. Prerequisite: 
consent of instructor. 

GEOG 668 Seminar in Economic Geogra- 
phy. (3) Prerequisite: consent of instruc- 
tor. An examination of themes and prob- 
lems in the field of economic geography. 
Repeatable to a maximum of six credits. 

GEOG 670 Theory and Method in Urban 
Geography .(3) Introductory survey of the 
structure and recent trends in urban 
geography. Emphasis on concepts in ur- 
ban geography using a problem solving 
approach. Urban literature, data sources, 
urban information systems, and survey 
research and sampling. 

GEOG 678 Seminar in Political Geogra- 
phy. (3) Beginning with a review of con- 
temporary advanced theory, the seminar 
will turn to problems such as the spatial 
consequences of political behavior, the 
political system and the organization of 
space including perceived space, the 
organization of political space. Repeat- 
able to a maximum of six semester 
hours. 

GEOG 679 Seminar In Urban Geography. 

(3) Flexible in format to allow adaptation 
to particular topic being considered, this 
seminar is for advanced students in the 
department's metropolitan areas special- 
ty. Students normally will have had the 
seminar in economic geography. Possi- 
ble topics include: metropolitan systems, 
the impact of migrants and immigrants 
on the internal structure of the city, the 
development of black ghettos, the use of 
particular techniques in urban geographi- 
cal research. 

GEOG 698 Seminar In Cartography. (1-16) 



GEOG 718 Seminar in the Geography of 
Europe and Africa. (3) Prerequisite: 
GEOG 410, 415 or consent of instructor. 
Analysis of special problems concerning 
the resources and development of 
Europe and Africa. Repeatable to a maxi- 
mum of six credits. 

GEOG 738 Seminar in the Geography of 
East Asia. (3) Analysis of problems con- 
cerning the geography of East Asia with 
emphasis on special research methods 
and techniques applicable to the prob- 
lems of this area. Repeatable to a maxi- 
mum of six credits. 

GEOG 748 Seminar in the Geography of 
Latin America. (3) Prerequisite: GEOG 
431 , 432 or consent of instructor. An 
analysis of recent changes and trends in 
industrial development, exploitation of 
mineral resources and land utilization. 
Repeatable to a maximum of six credits. 

GEOG 758 Seminar in the Geography of 
the U.S.S.R. (3) Prerequisite; reading 
knowledge of Russian and GEOG 435 or 
consent of instructor. Investigation of 
special aspects of Soviet geography. Em- 
phasis on the use of Soviet materials. 
Repeatable to a maximum of six credits. 

GEOG 768 Seminar in the Geography of 
the Near East. (3) 

GEOG 788 Selected Topics in Geogra- 
phy. (1-3) Readings and discussion on 
selected topics in the field of geography. 
To be taken only with the joint consent 
of advisor and head of the department of 
geography. 

GEOG 789 Independent Readings. (1-3) 

Independent reading as arranged be- 
tween a graduate faculty member and 
student. Repeatable to a maximum of six 
credits. 

GEOG 790 Internship in Geography. (3) 
Field experience in the student's special- 
ty in a Federal, State, or local agency or 
private business. A reserach paper re- 
quired. 

GEOG 798 Independent Study. (1-6) Open 
only to students in the non-thesis M.A. 
option. 

GEOG 799 Master's Thesis Research. 
(1-6) 

GEOG 899 Doctoral Dissertation Re- 
search. (1-6) 



German Language and Liter- 
ature Program 

Professor and Chairman: Stern 
Professors: Best, Hinderer, Jones, 

Hering 
Associate Professors: Fleck, Pfister, 

Beicken 
Assistant Professors: Elder, Frederiksen 

The Germanic Section of the Depart- 
ment of Germanic and Slavic Lan- 
guages and Literatures offers pro- 
grams of study leading to the M.A. 
and Ph.D. degrees. Specialization in- 
cludes the following areas: Lan- 



guage Pedagogy and Applied Lin- 
guistics; Germanic Philology; 
Medieval Literature and Culture; 
Literature of the German Speaking 
Countries from the Rennalssance to 
the Present. 

Admission and Degree Information 

In addition to the Graduate School 
requirements, candidates must have 
a bachelor's degree with an under- 
graduate major in German language 
and literature or the equivalent, and 
fluency in the written and spoken 
language. Candidates for the doc- 
torate must have a master's degree 
in Germanic Studies or in a related 
discipline, for example: German, 
Scandinavian Studies, Language 
Education, Medieval Studies, etc. 

Degree requirements for the M.A. 
(thesis option) are: 24 hours of 
coursework, the thesis, and a written 
comprehensive examination. The 
M.A. (non-thesis option) requires 30 
hours of coursework, a mini-thesis 
with oral defense, and a written com- 
prehensive examination. For both 
options the comprehensives consist 
of five two-hour examinations based 
on the coursework and the M.A. 
Reading List. 

Degree requirements for the Ph.D. 
are as follows: 1) completion of at 
least 30 hours of coursework, over a 
period of residency at the University 
of Maryland of at least one year, and 
a further 12 hours of dissertation 
research; 2) a reading skill examina- 
tion in a language other than English 
or German, which may be another 
Germanic language or a language 
related to the candidate's research; 
3) comprehensive written examina- 
tions; 4) oral presentation of the 
dissertation topic to the Germanic 
Section graduate faculty before the 
topic is approved; 5) the dissertation; 
6) oral dissertation defense. The doc- 
toral comprehensives consist of 
seven three-hour examinations. The 
candidate has considerable freedom 
in choosing the subject to be 
covered in four of the examinations; 
-the other three being the required 
fields of philology or applied linguis- 
tics, medieval literature, and modern 
literature. Candidates who opt for all 
four selected topics in German 
literature will choose subjects in 
each of the following periods: 16th 
and 17th centuries, 18th century, 
19th century, 20th century; in which 



116 / Graduate Programs 



case the required modern literature 
examination will require interpreta- 
tion of a text. Candidates who select 
topics from other fields such as 
philology, Scandinavian Studies, 
medieval studies, etc., will take a 
general examination in the modern 
literature required exam. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

In addition to its course offerings 
listed below, the Germanic Section 
of the Department of Germanic and 
Slavic Languages and Literatures 
sponsors the German Club, the 
University of Maryland Chapter of 
Delta Phi Alpha (the national Ger- 
man language honors society), and a 
Drama Reading Circle at which Ger- 
man plays are read by students with 
assigned roles and then discussed 
with faculty assistance. Distin- 
guished scholars and lecturers, as 
well as visiting professors, visit the 
metropolitan area and campus 
regularly. College Park's closeness 
to Washington, D.C. facilitates 
participation in the many cultural 
functions of the capital with its 
wealth of German and Scandinavian 
social groups and national societies. 

Financial Assistance 

The Germanic Section is able to con- 
tribute to the financial support of its 
graduate students in the form of 
teaching and non-teaching assistant- 
ships as well as several fellowships. 

Additional Information 

For further information write to: 
Director of Graduate Studies, De- 
partment of Germanic and Slavic 
Languages and Literature. 

Courses 

GERM 001 Elementary German for 
Graduate Students. (3) Intensive elemen- 
tary course In the German language 
designed particularly for graduate 
students who wish to acquire a reading 
knovidedge. This course does not carry 
credit towards any degree at the univer- 
sity. 

GERM 401 Advanced Conversation. (3) 

Prerequisite: GERM 302 or equivalent. An 
opportunity for the advanced student to 
gain further conversational fluency and 
polish through intensive exercise in the 
aural/oral skills. Conducted in German. 

GERM 402 Stylistics. (3) Prerequisite: 
GERM 302 or equivalent. An advanced 
level presentation of German written 
style shifting concern from what is gram- 
matically correct to usage that is 
stylistically superior. Conducted in Ger- 
man. 



GERM 409 Selected Topics in German 
Language Study. (3) Prerequisite: GERM 
302 and permission of instructor. 
Repeatable to a maximum of six credits 
if subject matter is different. 

GERM 410 Structure of the German 
Language. (3) Prerequisite: GERM 302 or 
equivalent. An introduction to applied 
linguistics suited to the needs of the ad- 
vanced student and/or teacher of Ger- 
man. Structural analysis of the 
phonetics, phonology, morphology, syn- 
tax an vocabulary of modern German 
contrasted with the structure of modern 
English. Instruction in English. 

GERM 420 Literary Bibliography and 
Research Methods. (3) Prerequisite: 
GERM 115 or equivalent. Introduction to 
the use of German bibliographies, 
catalogues, and reference works in order 
to locate both primary and secondary 
sources. Techniques of conducting 
research, composing and documenting 
term papers and theses. Instruction in 
English. 

GERM 421 Literature of the Middle Ages. 

(3) Prerequisites: GERM 321 and 322, or 
permission of instructor. German 
literature from the 8th through the 15th 
centuries. Readings include Old High 
German Texts; The German heroic, 
courtly and popular Epic; Minnesang, 
Meistersang, the Late Medieval Epic: folk 
literature of the Late Middle Ages. Read 
in modern German translation. 

GERM 422 German Literature of the 
Baroque Period. (3) Prerequisites: GERM 
321 and 322, or permission of instructor. 
The Baroque period readings include 
such authors as Opitz, Grimmelhausen, 
Gryphius, Bidermann, Scheffler, 
Gerhardt, Lohenstein, Hofmannswaldau, 
Beer, Weise. Readings and instruction in 
German. 

GERM 423 Enlightenment: Storm and 
Stress. (3) Prerequisites: GERM 321 and 
322, or permission of instructor. The 
period (ca. 1720-1786) from Gottsched's 
influence to Goethe's Italian journey. 
Readings include such authors as Gott- 
sched, Gellert, Lessing, WIeland, 
Klopstock, Claudius, Herder, Klinger, 
Lenz, Schiller, and Goethe. Readings and 
instruction in German. 

GERM 424 Classicism. (3) Prerequisites: 
GERM 321 and 322, or permission of in- 
structor. The period (ca. 1786-1832) from 
Goethe's Italian journey to his death. 
Readings include such authors as 
Goethe, Schiller, Jean Paul, Hoelderlin. 
Readings and instruction in German. 

GERM 431 Romaticism and Biedermeier. 

(3) Prerequisites: GERM 321 and 322 or 
permission of instructor. The Romantic 
and Biedermeier periods. Readings in- 
clude such authors as Tieck, 
Wackenroder, Novalis, Brentano, Arnim, 
Kleist, E.T.A. Hoffmann, Eichendorff, 
Grillparzer, Raimund, Nestroy, Lenau, 
Moerike, Droste-Huelshoff, Stifter. 
Readings and instruction in German. 

GERM 432 Junges Deutschland and 
Realism. (3) Prerequisite: GERM 321 and 



322, or permission of instructor. Realism 
and periods of political unrest surround- 
ing the year 1848. Readings include such 
authors as Heine, Grabbe, Boerne, 
Buechner, Gutzkow, Hebbel, Keller, 
Storm, Raabe, Meyer, Fontane. Readings 
and instruction in German. 

GERM 433 Naturalism and its Counter 
Currents. (3) Prerequisites: GERM 321 
and 322 or permission of instructor. The 
periods of Naturalism, Impressionism, 
Neoromanticism and Neoclassicism. 
Readings include such authors as 
Anzengruber, Holz, Sudermann, Haupt- 
mann, George, Wedekind, Hofmannsthal, 
Schnitzler, Rilke. Heinrich Mann, 
Hesse. Readings and instruction in 
German. 

GERM 438 German Literature in Transla- 
tion. (3) Different movements, genres, or 
other special topics will be treated each 
semester. Repeatable up to a maximum 
of six credits if subject matter is dif- 
ferent. May not be counted in fulfillment 
of German major requirement for German 
literature. Readings and instruction in 
English. 

GERM 439 Proseminar in German 
Literature. (3) Prerequisites: GERM 321 
and 322, or permission of instructor. 
Specialized study of an author, school, 
genre, or theme. Repeatable to a maxi- 
mum of six credits if subject matter is 
different. Readings and instruction in 
German. 

GERM 462 Expressionism to the Present. 

(3) Prerequisites — GERM 321 and 322. 
Prose and dramatic writings from Expres- 
sionism to present. Modern literary and 
philosophical movements. 

GERM 471 Introduction to Indo-European 
Philology. (3) Basic principles of 
historical language study: terminology of 
phonetics and morphology, language 
families, writing systems. Reconstructed 
Indo-European and surveys of the most 
important ancient Indo-European lan- 
guages: Sanskrit, Old Church Slavonic, 
Lithuanian, Classic Greek, Latin, Gothic. 
Instruction in English: no knowledge of 
German required. 

GERM 472 Introduction to Germanic 
Philology. (3) Prerequisites: GERM 115 
and GERM 471, or equivalent. Recon- 
structed Proto-Germanic and surveys of 
Gothic, Old Norse, Old English, Old 
Saxon. The development of High German 
from the Old High German period 
through Middle High German to modern 
German: a short introduction to modern 
German dialectology. Instruction in 
English. 

GERM 473 Reading Swedish, Danish and 
Norwegian I. (3) Develops reading facility 
in three languages in one semester. 
Texts read include Bergman's Seventh 
Seal, Tales by H.C. Andersen, excerpts 
works by Ibsen and Hamsun, and 
selected folk literature. No foreign 
language prerequisite. 

GERM 474 Reading Swedish, Danish and 
Norwegian II. (3) Prerequisite — GERM 
473 or permission of the instructor. Fur- 
ther development of reading facility. 



Graduate Programs / 117 



GERM 475 Old Norse. (3) The language of 
the Old Icelandic Saga, the Eddas and 
Skaldic poetry. Reading of texts in the 
original; historical development of Old 
Norse and its role in the Germanic 
language family. No knowledge of Ger- 
man or a Scandinavian language re- 
quired; instruction in English. 

GERM 479 Prosemlnar in Germanic 
Philology. (3) Prerequisite — consent of 
instructor. Selected topics such as com- 
parative Germanic studies, Old Norse 
language or readings in Old Norse Litera- 
ture, modern German dialectology. 
Repeatable to a maximum of six credits 
if subject matter is different. 

GERM 489 Prosemlnar In Germanic 
Culture. (3) Selected topics in the cultural 
and intellectural history of the German 
and Germanic language areas. In English. 
Repeatable to a maximum of six credits 
if subject matter is different. 

GERM 499 Directed Study in German. 
(1-3) For advanced students, by permis- 
sion of department chairman. Course 
may be repeated for credit if content dif- 
fers. May be repeated to a maximum of 
six credits. 

GERM 611 College Teaching of German. 

(3) Instruction, demonstration and 
classroom practice under supervision of 
modern procedures in the presentation 
of elementary German courses to college 
age students. 

GERM 621 Medieval Narrative. (3) An In- 
troduction to the form and structure of 
the Medieval Narrative, treatment of the 
most important authors and works of the 
period. 

GERM 631 German Lyric Poetry. (3) An 

exposition of the genre of lyric poetry, its 
metrical and aesthetic background, il- 
lustrated by characteristic examples 
from the Middle Ages to the present. 

GERM 641 German Novelle. (3) Study of 
the development of the genre from the 
18th century to the present. 

GERM 651 German Novel. (3) The theory 
and structure of the German novel from 
the Baroque to the present. 

GERM 661 German Drama. (3) An in- 
troduction to the theory and structure of 
the German drama from the Baroque to 
the present with extensive interpretation 
of characteristic works. 

GERM 671 Gothic, Old High German, 
Middle High German I. (3) The first 
semester of a two-semester practicum in 
reading Gothic, Old and Middle High Ger- 
man, with emphasis on linguistic 
analysis. 

GERM 672 Gothic, Old High German, 
Middle High German II. (3) Prerequisite: 
German 671. Continuation of German 
671. 

GERM 799 Master's Thesis Research. 

(1-6) 

GERM 819 Individual Study. (1-3) Prereq- 
uisite: consent of instructor. May be 
repeated to a maximum of six credits if 
content differs. 



GERM 829 Seminar in German Literature 
of the Middle Ages. (3) Exhaustive study 
of one or more representative authors or 
works of the Middle Ages. May be 
repeated to a maximum of nine credits if 
content differs. 

GERM 839 Seminar in 16th and 17th Cen- 
tury Literature. (3) The German literature 
of the humanists, the Reformation and 
the Baroque is illustrated by study of one 
or more authors of the 16th or 17th cen- 
turies. May be repeated up to a total of 
nine credits when content differs. 

GERM 849 Seminar in 18th Century 
Literature. (3) In depth study of one or 
more authors from the periods Enlighten- 
ment, Sentimentalism or Storm and 
Stress or Classicism. May be repeated up 
to a total of nine credits when content 
differs. 

GERM 859 Seminar in 19th Century 
Literature. (3) Comprehensive coverage 
from one or more authors of Roman- 
ticism, Biedermeier, Young Germany or 
Realism. May be repeated for a total of 
up to nine credits when content differs. 

GERM 869 Seminar in 20th Centrury 
Literature. (3) Concentrated investigation 
of a literary movement or of one or more 
authors from the period of Naturalism to 
the present. May be repeated to a max- 
imum of nine credits if the content is dif- 
ferent. 

GERM 879 Seminar in Germanic 
Philology. (3) In depth study of a topic in 
Germanic or Indo-European philology: 
comparative Germanic grammar, 
runology, dialect geography, Eddie or 
Skaldic poetry, Indo-European studies. 
May be repeated to a maximum of nine 
credits if content differs. 

GERM 889 Seminar in Germanic Area 
Studies. (3) Comprehensive study of a 
selected topic in German or Germanic 
area studies: history of ideas, cultural 
history, Germanic literatures other than 
German, folk literature and folklore. May 
be repeated to a maximum of nine 
credits if content differs. 

GERM 899 Doctoral Dissertation Re- 
search. (1-8) 

Russian 

RUSS 001 Elementary Russian for 
Graduate Students. (3) Graduate 
students should register as auditors 
only. Intensive elementary course in the 
Russian language designed particularly 
for graduate students who wish to ac- 
quire reading knowledge. This course 
does not carry credit towards any degree 
at the university. 

RUSS 401 Advanced Composition. (3) 

RUSS 402 Advanced Composition. (3) 

RUSS 421 Russian Civilization (In Rus- 
sian) I. (3) An historical survey of Russian 
civilization, emphasizing architecture, 
painting, sculpture, music, ballet and the 
theater to the beginning of the 19th cen- 
tury pointing out the inter-relationship of 
all with literary movements. Taught in 
Russian. 



RUSS 422 Russian Civilization (In Rus- 
sian) II. (3) An historical survey of Rus- 
sian civilization emphasizing architec- 
ture, painting, sculpture, music, ballet, 
and the theater, from the beginning of 
the 19th century to the present pointing 
out the inter-relationships of all with 
literary movements. Taught in Russian. 

RUSS 441 Russian Literature of the Eigh- 
teenth Century. (3) 

RUSS 451 Russian Literature of the Nine- 
teenth Century. (3) 

RUSS 452 Russian Literature of the Nine- 
teenth Century. (3) 

RUSS 461 Soviet Russian Literature. (3) 

RUSS 462 Soviet Russian Literature. (3) 

RUSS 465 Modern Russian Poetry. (3) 

RUSS 466 Modern Russian Drama. (3) 

RUSS 467 Modern Russian Fiction. (3) 

RUSS 468 19th Century Russian 
Literature in Translation. (3) Development 
of Russian literary thought in the Rus- 
sian novel and short prose of the 19th 
century. Influence of western literatures 
and philosophies considered. Repeatable 
to a maximum of six credits when con- 
tent differs. 

RUSS 470 Applied Linguistics. (3) The 

nature of applied linguistics and its con- 
tributions to the effective teaching of 
foreing languages. Comparative study of 
English and Russian, with emphasis 
upon points of divergence. Analysis, 
evaluation and construction of related 
drills. 

RUSS 471 Comparative Slavic 
Linguistics. (3) Comparative Slavic 
linguistics and, especially, a concept of 
the place of the Russian language in the 
world of Slavic culture through the 
reading of selected texts illustrating 
common Slavic relationships and dis- 
similarities. 

RUSS 478 Soviet Literature in Transla- 
tion. (3) Russian literature since 1917, 
both as a continuation of prerevolu- 
tionary traditions and as a reflection of 
Soviet ideology. Repeatable to a maxi- 
mum of six credits when content differs. 



Government and Politics 
Program 

Professor and Chairman: Bobrow 

Professors: Anderson, Harrison, Hathorn, 
Hsueh, Jacobs, McNelly, Murphy, 
Phillips, Piper, Plischke, Segal, Young 

Associate Professors: Butterworth, 
Claude, Conway, Devine, Elkin, Glass, 
Glendening, Hardin, Heisler, Koury, 
Oppenheimer, Pirages, Ranald, 
Reeves, Stone, Terchek, Wilkenfeld 

Assistant Professors: Christensen, 
Goodin, Lanning, McCarrick, Nzuwah, 
Oliver, Peroff, Postbrief, Usianer, 
Werbos, Woolpert 

The Department of Governnnent and 
Politics offers programs leading to 
the degrees of Master of Arts and 



118 / Graduate Programs 



Doctor of Philosophy. Areas of 
specialization include American 
politics, comparative politics, inter- 
national politics, political behavior, 
normative, empirical and formal 
theory, public administration, and 
public policy. 

Admission and Degree Information 

Master's degree candidates may 
select a thesis or a non-thesis op- 
tion, both of which require six 
semester hours of research methods 
and statistics, six semester hours of 
political theory, and a compre- 
hensive examination in one field of 
political science. Both options re- 
quire a total of 30 semester hours of 
credit. 

The doctoral program is designed 
for completion within five years and 
involves seminars, directed research 
and opportunities for teaching ex- 
perience. A minimum of at least 36 
semester hours of course work at 
the 600-800 level is required. All 
students must complete nine hours 
of research methods and statistics, 
nine hours of normative, empirical, 
and formal political theory, and a 
comprehensive examination in two 
fields of political science. The ex- 
amination fields are defined by each 
student in consultation with an ad- 
visor and may cut across traditional 
departmental and disciplinary boun- 
daries. 

Financial Assistance 

In addition to teaching assistant- 
ships, the Department also has a 
government internship program for 
students interested in public ad- 
ministration and a limited and 
variable number of research posi- 
tions with research grants. 

Additional Information 

Further information and a manual on 
graduate study can be secured from 
the Department's Office of the Direc- 
tor of Graduate Studies. 

Courses 

GVPT 401 Problems of Worid Politics. (3) 

Prerequisite, GVPT 170, A study of 
governmental problems of international 
scope, such as causes of war, problems 
of neutrality, and propaganda. Students 
are .'equired to report on readings from 
current literature. 

GVPT 402 International Law. (3) Prereq- 
uisite, GVPT 170. A study of the basic 
character, general principles and specific 
rules of international lavi/, with emphasis 
on recent and contemporary trends in 



the field and its relation to other aspects 

of international affairs. 

GVPT 411 Public Personnel Administra- 
tion. (3) Prerequisite. GVPT 410 or BSAD 
360. A sun/y of public personnel Admini- 
stration, including the development of 
merit civil service, the personnel agency, 
classification, recruitment, examination 
techniques, promotion, service ratings, 
training, discipline, employee relations, 
and retirement. 

GVPT 412 Public Financial Administra- 
tion. (3) Prerequisite, GVPT 410 or ECON 
450. A survey of governmental financial 
procedures, including processes of cur- 
rent and capital budgeting, the adminis- 
tration of public borrowing, the tech- 
niques of public purchasing, and the 
machinery of control through pre-audit 
and post-audit. 

GVPT 413 Govemmental Organization 
and Management. (3) Prerequisite. GVPT 
410. A study of the theories of organiza- 
tion and management in American 
Government with emphasis on new 
trends, experiments and reorganizations. 

GVPT 414 Administrative Law. (3) Prereq- 
uisite, GVPT 170. A study of the discre- 
tion exercised by administrative agen- 
cies, including analysis of their func- 
tions, their powers over persons and 
property, their procedures, and judicial 
sanctions and controls. 

GVPT 417 Comparative Study of Public 
Administration. (3) Prerequisite. GVPT 
280 or 410, or consent of instructor. An 
introduction to the study of govern- 
mental administrative systems viewed 
from the standpoint of comparative 
typologies and theoretical schemes 
useful in cross-national comparisons and 
empirical studies of the politics of the 
administrative process in several nations. 
Both western and non-western countries 
are included. 

GVPT 422 Quantitative Political Analysis. 

(3) Prerequisite, GVPT 220, or consent of 
instructor. Introduction to quantitative 
methods of data analysis, including 
selected statistical methods, block analy- 
sis, content analysis, and scale construc- 
tion. 

GVPT 426 Public Opinion. (3) Prereq- 
uisite, GVPT 170. An examination of 
public opinion and its effect on political 
action, with emphasis on opinion forma- 
tion and measurement, propaganda and 
pressure groups. 

GVPT 427 Political Sociology. (3) Prereq- 
uisite, GVPT 220, or consent of instruc- 
tor, A study of the societal aspects of 
political life including selected aspects 
of the sociology of group formation and 
group dynamics, political association, 
community integration and political 
behavior presented in the context of the 
societal environments of political 
systems. 

GVPT 429 Problems in Political Behavior. 

(3) Prerequisite, GVPT 170. The problem 
approach to political behavior with em- 
phasis on theoretical and empirical 



studies on selected aspects of the poli- 
tical process. 

GVPT 431 Introduction to Constitutional 
Law. (3) Prerequisite, GVPT 170. A 
systematic inquiry into the general prin- 
ciples of the American constitutional 
system, with special reference to the role 
of the judiciary in the interpretation and 
enforcement of the federal constitution. 

GVPT 432 Civil Rights and the Constitu- 
tion. (3) Prerequisite, GVPT 431. A study 
of civil rights in the American constitu- 
tional context, emphasizing freedom of 
religion, freedom of expression, minority 
discrimination, and the rights of defen- 
dants. 

GVPT 433 The Judicial Process. (3) Pre- 
requisite, GVP 170. An examination of 
judicial organization in the United States 
at all levels of government, with some 
emphasis on legal reasoning, legal 
research and court procedures. 

GVPT 434 Race Relations and Public 
Law. (3) Prerequisite, GVPT 170. A poli- 
tical and legal examination of the con- 
stitutionally protected rights affecting 
racial minorities and of the constitutional 
power of the federal courts. Congress, 
and the executive to define, protect and 
extend these rights. 

GVPT 435 Judicial Behavior. (3) A study 
of judicial decision making at the state 
and national levels, drawing primarily on 
the more recent quantitative and 
behavioral literature. 

GVPT 436 The Legal Status of Women. 

(3) An examination of judicial interpreta- 
tion and application of common, 
statutory, and constitutional law as these 
affect the status of women in American 
society, 

GVPT 441 History of Polifical Theory — 
Ancient and Medieval. (3) Prerequisite, 
GVPT 170. A survey of the principal poli- 
tical theories set forth in the works of 
writers before Machiavelli. 

GVPT 442 History of Political Theory — 
Modem and Recent. (3) Prerequisite, 
GVPT 170. A survey of the principal poli- 
tical theories set forth in tfie works of 
writers from Machiavelli to J. S. Mill. 

GVPT 443 Contemporary Political Theory. 

(3) Prerequisite, GVPT 441 or 442. A sur- 
vey of the principal political theories and 
ideologies from Karl Marx to the present. 

GVPT 444 American Political Theory. (3) 

Prerequisite, GVPT 170. A study of the 
development and growth of American 
political concepts from the Colonial 
period to the present. 

GVPT 445 Russian Political Thought. (3) 

Prerequisite, GVPT 170. A survey and 
analysis of political ideas in Russia and 
the Soviet Union from early times to the 
present. 

GVPT 448 Non-Western Political 
Thought. (3) Political thought originating 
in Asia, the Middle East, and Africa. This 
is not a survey of all non-western politi- 
cal thought, but a course to be limited by 
the professor with each offering. When 



Graduate Programs / 119 



repeated by a student, consent of in- 
structor is required. 

GVPT 450 Comparative Study of Foreign 
Policy Formation. (3) Prerequisite, GVPT 
280 or 300, or consent of instructor. An 
introduction to tfie comparative study of 
foreign policy formation structures and 
processes followed by a survey of tfie 
domestic sources of policy for major 
states. A conspectus of substantive pat- 
terns of foreign policy in analytically 
salient types of systems is presented. 
Domestic and global systemic sources of 
foreign policy are compared. 

GVPT 451 Foreign Policy of the U.S.S.R. 

(3) Prerequisite, GVPT 170. A study of tfie 
development of tfie foreign policy of tfie 
Soviet Union, with attention paid to tfie 
forces and conditions tfiat make for con- 
tinuities and ctianges from Tsarist 
policies. 

GVPT 452 Inter-American Relations. (3) 

Prerequisite, GVPT 170. An analytical and 
fiistorical study of tfie Latin-American 
policies of tfie United States and of prob- 
lems in our relations witfi individual 
countries, witfi emphasis on recent 
developments. 

GVPT 453 Recent East Asian Politics. (3) 

Prerequisites: GVPT 170. The back- 
ground and interpretation of recent 
political events in East Asia and their in- 
fluence on world politics. 

GVPT 454 Contemporary African Politics. 

(3) Prerequisite, GVPT 170. A survey of 
contemporary development in the inter- 
national politics of Africa, with special 
emphasis on the role of an emerging 
Africa in world affairs. 

GVPT 455 Contemporary Middle Eastern 
Politics. (3) Prerequisite, GVPT 170. A 
sruvey of contemporary development in 
the international politics of the Middle 
East, with special emphasis on the role 
of emerging Middle East nations in world 
affairs, 

GVPT 457 American Foreign Relations. 

(3) Prerequisite, GVPT 170. The principles 
and machinery of the conduct of 
American foreign relations, with em- 
phasis on the Department of State and 
foreign service, and an analysis of the 
major foreign policies of the United 
States. 

GVPT 460 State and Local Administra- 
tion. (3) Prerequisite, GVPT 170. A study 
of the administrative structure, pro- 
cedures and policies of state and local 
governments with special emphasis on 
the state level and on intergovernmental 
relationships, and with illustrations from 
Maryland governmental arrangements. 

GVPT 461 Metropolitan Administration. 

(3) Prerequisite, GVPT 170. An examina- 
tion of administrative problems relating 
to public services, planning and coordi- 
nation in a metropolitan environment. 

GVPT 462 Urban Politics. (3) Urban 
political process and institutions con- 
sidered in the light of changing social 
and '■■conorr' ■ 'rnditions. 



GVPT 473 Legislatures and Legislation. 

(3) Prerequisite, GVPT 170. A comprehen- 
sive study of legislative organization pro- 
cedure and problems. The course in- 
cludes opportunities for student contact 
with Congress and with the Legislature 
of Maryland. 

GVPT 474 Political Parties. (3) Prereq- 
uisite, GVPT 170. A descriptive and analy- ' 
tical examination of American political 
parties, nominations, elections, and poli- 
tical leadership. 

GVPT 475 The Presidency and the Ex- 
ecutive Branch. (3) Prerequisite, GVPT 
170. An examination of the executive, 
legislative and party roles of the Presi- 
dent in the political process. 

GVPT 479 Problems of American Public 
Policy. (3) Prerequisite, GVPT 170. The 
background and interpretation of various 
factors which affect the formation and 
execution of American public policy. 

GVPT 480 Comparative Political 
Systems. (3) Prerequisite, GVPT 280 and 
at least one other course in comparative 
government. A study, along functional 
lines, of major political institutions, such 
as legislatures, executives, courts, 
bureaucracies, public organizations, and 
political parties. 

GVPT 481 Government and Administra- 
tion of the Soviet Union. (3) Prerequisite, 
GVPT 170. A study of the adoption of the 
communist philosophy by the Soviet 
Union, of its governmental structure and 
of the administration of government 
policy in the Soviet Union. 

GVPT 482 Government and Politics of 
Latin America. (3) Prerequisite, GVPT 
170. A comparative study of the govern- 
mental systems and political processes 
of the Latin American countries, with 
special emphasis on Argentina, Brazil, 
Chile, and Mexico. 

GVPT 483 Government and Politics of 
Asia. (3) Prerequisite, GVPT 280 or 453, or 
HIST 261, or 262 or HI FN 442, or 445. A 
comparative study of the political 
systems of China, Japan, India and other 
selected Asian countries. 
GVPT 484 Government and Politics of 
Africa. (3) Prerequisite, GVPT 170. A com- 
parative study of the governmental 
systems and political processes of the 
African countries, with special emphasis 
on the problems of nation-building in 
emergent countries. 

GVPT 485 Government and Politics of 
the Middle East. (3) Prerequisite, GVPT 
170. A comparative study of the govern- 
mental systems and political processes 
of the Middle Eastern countries, with 
special emphasis on the problems of 
nation-building in emergent countries. 

GVPT 486 Comparative Studies in Euro- 
pean Politics. (3) Prerequisite, GVPT 280, 
or consent of instructor. A comparative 
study of political processes and govern- 
mental forms in selected European coun- 
tries. 

GVPT 487 The Government and Politics 
of South Asia. Political systems and 



governments of such countries as India, 
Pakistan, Bangia Desh, Ceylon, and 
Nepal. 

GVPT 492 The Comparative Politics of 
Race Relations. (3) Impact of government 
and politics on race relations in various 
parts of the world. The origins, problems, 
and manifestations of such racial 
policies as segregation, apartheid, in- 
tegration, assimilation, partnership, and 
nonracialism will be analyzed. 

GVPT 600 Proseminar in Government and 
Politics. (3) Required of M.A. candidates. 
A proseminar offering a survey of major 
concepts, approaches, and research 
trends in political science. 

GVPT 700 Scope and Method of Political 
Science. (3) Required of all Ph.D. can- 
didates. A seminar in the methodologies 
of political science, and their respective 
applications to different research fields. 
Interdisciplinary approaches and biblio- 
graphical techniques are also reviewed. 

GVPT 707 Functional Problems in inter- 
national Relations — Comparative 
Systems. (3) A survey from Kautilya to 
Kaplan of the literature in IR theory with 
an emphasis on comparative historical 
systems. 

GVPT 708 Seminar in International Re- 
lations Theory. (3) An examination of the 
major approaches, concepts, and 
theories in the study of world politics 
with special emphasis on contemporary 
literature. Repeatable to a maximum of 6 
hours. 

GVPT 710 Introduction to Graduate 
Study in Public Administration. (3) An ex- 
amination of the history, background, 
and trends of public administration and 
the basic concepts and the approaches 
utilized in the organizational process of 
public bureaucracies. Readings from tex- 
tual sources will include the following: 
the study of public administration. The 
societal and political environment, 
organization theory and behavior, ad- 
ministrative law, comparative and 
development administration, policy and 
systems analysis, program planning and 
budgeting, manpower resources develop- 
ment, organizational performance and ac- 
countability. 

GVPT 720 Policy Evaluation. (3) An ex- 
amination of the application of social in- 
dicators and accounts, field and labora- 
tory experimentation, formal modeling, 
and otfier techniques drawn from the 
social sciences to problems of public 
policy selected from various levels of the 
political system. 

GVPT 780 Seminar in the Comparative 
Study of Politics. (3) An examination of 
the salient approaches to and conceptual 
frameworks for the comparative study of 
politics, followed by the construction of 
models and typologies of political 
systems. 

GVPT 799 Master's Thesis Research. (1-6) 

GVPT 802 Seminar in International Law. 

(3) Reports on selected topics assigned 
for individual study and reading in 



120 / Graduate Programs 



substantive and procedural international 
law. 

GVPT 803 Seminar in International Poli- 
tical Organization. (3) A study of ttie 
forms and functions of various interna- 
tional organizations. 

GVPT 808 Selected Topics in Functional 
Problems in International Relations. (3) 

An examination of tfie major substantive 
issues in contemporary international 
relations. 

GVPT 810 Governmental Organization 
Theory. (3) A study of recent develop- 
ments in the area of organizational 
tfieory witfi an empfiasis on empirical 
studies of organizational behavior. 

GVPT 812 Seminar in Public Financial 
Administration. (3) Readings and reports 
on topics assigned for individual or 
group study in the field of public finan- 
cial administration. 

GVPT 813 Problems of Public Personnel 
Administration. (3) Reports on topics 
assigned for individual study and reading 
in the field of public personnel adminis- 
tration. 

GVPT 814 Developmental Public Admin- 
istration. (3) Reports, readings and/or 
field surveys on topics assigned for indi- 
vidual or group study in international, na- 
tional, regional or local environments. 

GVPT 815 Government Administrative 
Planning and Management. (3) Reports 
on topics assigned for individual study 
and reading in administrative planning 
and management in government. 

GVPT 816 Studies in Comparative 
Governmental Administration. (3) An ex- 
amination of theoretical concepts and 
empirical findings in the field of com- 
parative administration. Individual 
readings and research dealing with the 
civil services of western and non-western 
nations will be assigned. 

GVPT 818 Problems of Public Adminis- 
tration. (3) Reports on topics assigned 
for individual study and reading in the 
field of public administration. 

GVPT 822 Problems in Quantitative 
Political Analysis. (3) Prerequisite, three 
hours of statistics or consent of instruc- 
tor. Study of selected problems in quan- 
titative political analysis. 

GVPT 826 Seminar in Public Opinion. (3) 

Reports on topics assigned for individual 
study and reading in the field of public 
opinion. 

GVPT 827 Seminar in Political Sociology. 

(3) Prerequisite — GVPT 427 or equiva- 
lent. Inquiries into the conceptual and 
theoretical foundations of and empirical 
data in the field of political sociology. In- 
dividual readings and research problems 
will be assigned, dealing with the social 
contexts of politics and the political 
aspects of social relationships. 

GVPT 828 Selected Problems in Political 
Behavior. (3) Individual reading and re- 
search reports on selected problems in 
the study of political behavior. 



GVPT 830 Seminar in Public Law. (3) 

Reports on topics for individual study 
and reading in the fields of constitutional 
and administrative law. 

GVPT 840 Analytical Systems and Theory 
Construction. (3) Prerequisite, GVPT 700. 
Examination of the general theoretical 
tools available to political scientists and 
of the problems of theory building. Atten- 
tion is given to communications theory, 
decision-making, game theory and other 
mathematical concepts, personality 
theory, role theory, structural-functional 
analysis, and current behavioral ap- 
proaches. 

GVPT 841 Great Political Thinkers. (3) 

Prerequisite, GVPT 441. Intensive study 
of one or more men each semester. 

GVPT 842 Man and the State. (3) Pre- 
requisite, GVPT 442. Individual reading 
and reports on such recurring concepts 
in political theory as liberty, equality, 
justice, natural law and natural rights, 
private property, sovereignty, nationalism 
and the organic state. 

GVPT 844 American Political Theory. (3) 

Prerequisite, GVPT 444. Analytical and 
historical examination of selected topics 
in American political thought. 

GVPT 845 Marxist Political Theory. (3) 

Prerequisite, GVPT 443 or consent of in- 
structor. Intensive study and analysis of 
the leading ideas of Marx and Engels and 
their development in the different forms 
of social democracy and of communism. 

GVPT 846 Theories of Democracy. (3) 

Prerequisite, GVPT 442, A survey and 
analysis of the leading theories of demo- 
cratic government, with attention to such 
topics as freedom, equality, representa- 
tion, dissent, and critics of democracy. 

GVPT 847 Seminar in Non-Western Politi- 
cal Theory. (3) Intensive study of selected 
segments of political theory outside of 
the Western European tradition. 

QVPT 848 Current Problems in Political 
Theory. (3) Prerequisite, GVPT 443. Inten- 
sive examination of the development of 
political theory since the Second World 
War. 

GVPT 850 Applied Foriegn Policy 
Analysis. (3) Individual research and 
reporting on standards of policy perfor- 
mance and analysis with emphasis on 
data display, information organization, 
forecasting, and rational resource alloca- 
tion. 

GVPT 851 Area Problems in International 
Relations — Soviet Union. (3) An ex- 
amination of problems in the relations of 
states involving the Soviet Union. 

GVPT 852 Area Problems in International 
Relations — Latin America. (3) An ex- 
amination of problems in the relations of 
states within Latin America. 

GVPT 853 Area Problems in International 

Relations — Asia. (3) An examination of 

problems in the relations of states within 

Asia. 

GVPT 854 Area Problems in International 

Relations — Africa. (3) An examination of 



problems in the relations of states within 
Africa. 

GVPT 855 Area Problems in International 
Relations — Middle East. (3) An examina- 
tion of problems in the relations of 
states within the Middle East. 

GVPT 856 Area Problems in International 
Relations — Europe. (3) An examination 
of problems in the relations of states 
within Europe. 

GVPT 857 Seminar in American Foreign 
Relations. (3) Reports on selected topics 
assigned for individual study and reading 
in American foreign policy and the con- 
duct of American foreign relations. 

GVPT 858 Selected Topics in Area Prob- 
lems in International Relations. (3) 

Special topics concerning regional prob- 
lems in the relations of states. 

GVPT 862 Seminar on Intergovernmental 
Relations. (3) Reports on topics assigned 
for individual study and reading in the 
field of recent intergovernmental rela- 
tions. 

GVPT 868 Problems of State and Local 
Government. (3) Report of topics as- 
signed for individual study in the field of 
state local government throughout the 
United States. 

GVPT 869 Seminar in Urban Administra- 
tion. (3) Selected topics are examined by 
the team research method with students 
responsible for planning, field investiga- 
tion, and report writing. 

GVPT 870 Seminar in American Political 
Institutions. (3) Reports on topics as- 
signed for individual study and reading in 
the background and development of 
American Government. 

GVPT 873 Seminar in Legislatures and 
Legislation. (3) Reports on topics as- 
signed for individual study and reading 
about the composition and organization 
of legislatures and about the legislative 
process. 

GVPT 874 Seminar in Political Parties 
and Politics. (3) Reports on topics as- 
signed for individual study and reading in 
the fields of political organization and ac- 
tion. 

GVPT 876 Seminar in National Security 
Policy. (3) An examination of the com- 
ponents of United States security policy. 
Factors, both internal and external, af- 
fecting national security will be con- 
sidered. Individual reporting as assigned. 

GVPT 878 Problems in American Govern- 
ment and Politics. (3) An examination of 
contemporary problems in various fields 
of government and politics in the United 
States, with reports on topics assigned 
for individual study. 

GVPT 881 Comparative Governmental In- 
stitutions — Soviet Union. (3) An ex- 
amination of government and politics in 
the Soviet Union. 

GVPT 882 Comparative Governmental In- 
stitdtions — Latin America. (3) An ex- 
amination of governments and politics 
within Latin America. 

Graduate Programs / 121 



GVPT 883 Comparative Governmental In- 
stitutions — Asia. (3) An examination of 
governments and politics vi^ithin Asia. 

GVPT 884 Comparative Governmental In- 
stitutions — Africa. (3) An examination of 
governments and politics within Africa. 

GVPT 885 Comparative Governmental In- 
stitutions — Middle East. (3) An examina- 
tion of governments and politics withiin 
the Middle East. 

GVPT 886 Comparative Governmental In- 
stitutions — Europe. (3) An examination 
of governments and politics within 
Europe. 

GVPT 887 Seminar in the Politics of 
Developing Nations. (3) An examination 
of the programs of political development 
in the emerging nations with special 
references to the newly independent na- 
tions of Asia and Africa, and the less 
developed countries of Latin America. In- 
dividual reporting as assigned. 

GVPT 888 Selected Topics in Com- 
parative Governmental Institutions. (3) An 

examination of special topics in com- 
parative politics. 

GVPT 898 Readings in Government and 
Politics. (3) Guided readings and discus- 
sions on selected topics in political 
science. 

GVPT 899 Doctoral Dissertation Re- 
search. (1-8) 

Health Education Program 

Professor and Chairman: Burt 
Professors: Johnson, Leviton 
Associate Professors: D. A. Girdano, 

D. E, Girdano. Miller. Tifft. Clearwater 
Ass/sfar7f Professors: Althoff. Needle. Stone. 

Yarian 

The Department of Health Education of- 
fers a program designed to prepare stu- 
dents as teachers and community 
health workers. Graduates of the pro- 
gram have placement opportunities in 
public school systems, colleges and uni- 
versities, government service and com- 
munity health. 

Admission and Degree Information 

The Department offers courses of study 
leading to the degrees of Master of Arts, 
Doctor of Education and Doctor of Philos- 
ophy. Admission is open to students 
holding the bachelors degree in areas 
related to the social, psychological or 
biological basis of health education 

Each student is required to submit a 
thesis, to present the work orally in a 
seminar, and to defend it to the satisfac- 
tion of his examining committee. All stu- 
dents must take Health Education 600 
and 710. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

The student may experience specific 
application of theory through numerous 

122 / Graduate Programs 



field studies and departmental clinics in 
the areas of children's health and de- 
velopment, developmental programs 
for the aged, obesity and weight control, 
controlling stress and tension, smoking 
cessation, and driver and safety educa- 
tion. 

The proximity of the National Institutes 
of Health and the National Library of Medi- 
cine render the University of Maryland 
unusually suited for graduate work in 
health education. 

Financial Assistance 

A limited number of Graduate Teaching 
Assistantships are available. 

Additional Information 

For information and departmental publi- 
cation whte to Dr. Daniel A. Girdano, 
Director of Graduate Studies. 



Courses 

HLTH 420 Methods and Materials in Health 
Education. (3) Prerequisites. HLTH 105 or 
140. 310 or consent of instructor. The pur- 
pose of this course is to present the interrela- 
tionships of curriculum planning, methodol- 
ogy and the selection and use of teaching 
aids and materials. Special problems asso- 
ciated with health teaching are discussed. 
Students will become familiar with a variety 
of resources as well as planning for and pre- 
senting demonstration lessons. 

HLTH 450 Health Problems of Children 
and Youth. (3) This course Involves a study 
of the health needs and problems of pupils 
from the primary grades through high school. 
Physical, mental and psychosomatic aspects 
of health are considered in relation to the de- 
velopmental and school levels. Considera- 
tion is given to such topics as diet selection 
and control; exercise, recreation and rest; 
emotional upset and its implications; and 
psychosexual development and problems. 
The role of the teacher and parent in en- 
couraging optimal health is emphasized. 

HLTH 455 Physical Fitness of the Individ- 
ual. (3) A study of the major physical fitness 
problems confronting the adult in modern 
society. Consideration is given to the scien- 
tific appraisal, development and maintenance 
of fitness at all age levels. Such problems 
as obesity, weight reduction, chronic fatigue, 
posture, and special exercise programs are 
explored. This course is open to persons out- 
side the fields of physical education and health. 

HLTH 456 Health Problems of the Aging 
and the Aged. (3) Psychological, physologi- 
cal, and socio-economic aspects of aging; 
nutrition; sexuality; death, dying, and bereave- 
ment; self actualization and creativity health 
needs and crises of the aged. 
HLTH 460 Problems in School Health 
Education in Elementary and Secondary 
Schools. (2-6) This is a workshop type 
course designed particularly for inservice 
teachers to acquaint them with the best meth- 
ods of providing good health sen/ices, health- 
ful environment and health instruction. 



HLTH 470 The Health Program in the 
Elementary School. (3) Prerequisites, 
HLTH 105 or 140; 310. This course, designed 
for the elementary school classroom teacher, 
analyzes biological and sociological factors 
which determine the health status and needs 
of the individual elementary school child. The 
various aspects of the school program are 
evaluated in tenns of their role in health edu- 
cation. The total school health program is 
surveyed from the standpoint of organization 
and administration, and health appraisal. 
Emphasis is placed upon modern methods 
and current materials in health instruction. 
(The State Department of Education accepts 
this course for biological science credit). 

HLTH 471 Women's Health. (3) The women s 
health movement from the perspective of con- 
sumerism and feminism. The physician-pa- 
tient relationship in the gynecological and 
other medical settings. The gynecological 
exam, gynecological problems, contracep- 
tion, abortion, pregnancy, breast and cer- 
vical cancer and surgical procedures. Psycho- 
logical aspects of gynecological concerns. 

HLTH 476 Death Education. (3) Examina- 
tion of the genesis and development of present 
day death attitudes and behavior by use of 
a multidisciplinary life cycle approach. 

HLTH 477 Fundamentals of Sex Education. 

(3) This course is concerned with basic infor- 
mation regarding the physical, psychological, 
social, historical, semantic and comparative 
cultural aspects of sex. The adjustment 
needs and problems of children and adults 
during the course of maturing and aging are 
studied; and special consideration is given to 
the sex education program in schools. 

HLTH 480 Measurement in Health. (3) Two 

lectures and two laboratory periods per week. 
The application of the principles and tech- 
niques of educational measurement to the 
teaching of health and physical education; 
study of functions and techniques of measure- 
ments in the evaluation of student progress 
toward the ob|ectives of health and physical 
education, and in the evaluation of the effec- 
tiveness of teaching. 

HLTH 485 Controlling Stress and Tension. 
(3) Health problems related to stress and ten- 
sion Analysis of causative psycho-social 
stressors and intervening physiological 
mechanisms Emphasis on prevention and 
control of stress through techniques such as 
biofeedback, meditation and neuromuscular 
relaxation. 

HLTH 489 Field Laboratory Projects and 
Workshop. (1-6) A course designed to meet 
the needs of persons in the field with respect 
to workshop and research projects in special 
areas of knowledge not covered by regularly 
structured courses. Note; the maximum total 
number of credits that may be earned toward 
any degree in physical education, recreation, 
or health education under PHED, RECR, or 
HLTH 489 is six. 

HLTH 600 Seminar in Health. (1) 
HLTH 650 Health Problems in Guidance. 
(3) 

HLTH 651 Seminar on the Health Cor- 
relates of the Aging and Aged. (3) Investi- 
gates the most recent theoretical formula- 



tions, research data, and clinical and thera- 
peutic approaches to improving the health 
status of the aging. Extensive readings and 
research project are required. 

HLTH 652 Seminar in Death Education. 

(3) Prerequisite. HLTH 456 or permission of 
the instructor. The advanced study and inves- 
tigation of human dying, death, bereavement, 
suicidal behavior, and their relationship to 
human health utilizing a multidiscipllnary 
approach. 

HLTH 670 Status and Trends in Health Edu- 
cation. (3) 

HLTH 687 Advanced Seminar. (1-3) 

HLTH 688 Special Problems in Health 
Education. (1-6) 

HLTH 690 Administrative Direction of 
Health Education. (3) 

HLTH 710 Methods and Techniques of 
Research. (3) 

HLTH 720 Scientific Foundations of 
Health Education. (3) 

HLTH 730 Problems in Weight Control (3) 

Prerequisite, HLTH 720 or permission of 
instructor. A study of the causes, health cost, 
and control of obesity through analysis of lipid- 
glucose interaction: hunger-satiety theories 
and mechanisms; psycho-social forces in 
obesity: body composition, energy output: 
and disease states related to obesity. 

HLTH 740 Modern Theories of Health. (3) 

HLTH 750 Stress and Disease. (3) A study 
of the causative agents of chronic disease 
with particular emphasis on stress including 
the physiological response of the human or- 
ganism to contemporary psycho-social 
stressors and mechanisms of adaptation 
and prophylaxis. 

HLTH 760 Public Health. (3) 

HLTH 791 Curriculum Construction in 
Health Education. (3) 

HLTH 799 Master's Thesis Research. (1-6) 

HLTH 899 Doctoral Dissertation Research. 
(1-8) 

Hearing and Speech 
Sciences Program 

Associate Professor and Acting Chair- 
man: Bankson 
Professors: Newby 
Associate Professors: Baker, Hamlet' 
Assistant Professor: Bernthal, 

Cicci', Diggs, Doundna, McSpaden, 

Suter' 
Lecturer: Bennett, Sedge 
Researcti Professor: Causey 
Research Assistant Professor: Elkins 
Research Associates: Punch, Schweitzer 
'joint appointment with School of Den- 
tistry 

'joint appointment with School of 
Medicine 

Admission and Degree Information 

The Department of Hearing and 
Speech Sciences offers the M.A. 
degree with either the thesis or the 
non-thesis option, and with major 
emphasis either in speech and 



language pathology or in audiology. 
The Master's degree is required for 
individuals preparing for positions 
as speech pathologists or audlo- 
logists in the schools, in the hospi- 
tals or rehabilitation facilities. In 
hearing and speech centers, or In 
other clinical settings. Academic 
course work Is combined with super- 
vised clinical practice In the Univer- 
sity Speech and Hearing Clinic and 
In selected outside clinical facilities, 
so that the graduate will meet the 
academic requirements for clinical 
certification by the American 
Speech and Hearing Association, 
and for licensing in the State of 
Maryland. The Master's degree pro- 
gram Is accredited by the American 
Boards of Examiners In Speech 
Pathology and Audiology. 

Applicants for the M.A. degree 
must have completed the equivalent 
of an undergraduate major In hearing 
and speech sciences. The M.A. pro- 
gram usually requires three semes- 
ters and a summer session to com- 
plete. Only full-time students are ad- 
mitted to the program. 

The Department also offers the 
Ph.D. degree with major emphasis in 
speech and language pathology, 
audiology, speech science, or hear- 
ing science. Ordinarily a Master's 
degree Is required for admission to 
the doctoral program. Advanced 
courses in statistics and research 
design are required of all doctoral 
candidates. Although no formal 
minor Is required, students are en- 
couraged to take appropriate 
courses In other departments. The 
Department does not require profi- 
ciency in a foreign language. Course 
programs for the doctorate are 
planned by the student and a com- 
mittee of three faculty members. 
Qualifying Interviews are scheduled 
for each candidate after completion 
of 12 semester hours In the program. 
Written and oral comprehensive ex- 
aminations for admission to can- 
didacy are scheduled at the comple- 
tion of the formal course program. 

In addition to the application 
materials required by the Graduate 
School, the Department requires ap- 
plicants to furnish scores on the ap- 
titude portions of the Graduate 
Record Examination. Prospective ap- 
plicants should note that decisions 
on summer and fall admissions are 



made In early March, and on spring 
admissions in early October. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

The Department's facilities Include a 
blocommunications laboratory with 
an anecholc chamber, a speech 
science laboratory, electronics 
workshop, two 2-room audiology 
testing suites, and nine therapy 
rooms equipped for observation. Ad- 
ditional research and clinical 
facilities are available in the 
Washington and Baltimore metro- 
politan areas. The Library of Con- 
gress, the National Library of 
Medicine, and the libraries of the 
various medical schools In the 
Washington-Baltimore area supple- 
ment the University's library at Col- 
lege Park. 

Financial Assistance 

The Department is able to provide 
some financial support In the form 
of teaching or clinical asslstantships 
or tralneeships to approximately 40 
percent of the graduate students 
enrolled. 

Additional Information 

Additional Information about the 
M.A. and Ph.D. programs may be ob- 
tained by writing to the Chairman, 
Department of Hearing and Speech 
Sciences. 

Courses 

HESP 400 Speech and Language 
Development of Children. (3) Prereq- 
uisite, HESP 202. Analysis of normal pro- 
cesses of speech an language develop- 
ment in children. 

HESP 401 Survey of Speech Disorders. 

(3) Communication disorders in school 
children. May not be used by majors in 
hearing and speech sciences to satisfy 
major or supporting course re- 
quirements. 

HESP 403 Introduction to Phonetic 
Science. (3) Prerequisites: HESP 202 and 
PHYS 102. Phonetic transcription and 
phonetic principles. Acoustical and 
perceptual phonetics. 

HESP 404 Speech Pathology II. (3) Pre- 
requisite, HESP 302, 305. Etiology and 
therapeutic management of cleft palate 
and stuttering. 

HESP 406 Speech Pathology III. (3) Pre- 
requisite, HESP 302, 305. Etiology and 
therapeutic management of aphasia and 
delayed language. 

HESP 408 Clinical Practice. (3) Prereq- 
uisites: completion of the 21 hours of 
specified courses for the major, HESP 
404 or HESP 406, and permission of the 
clinical staff. Observation and participa- 
tion in the speech and hearing clinic. 

Graduate Programs / 123 



Repeatable to a maximum of six credits, 
but only three credits may apply toward 
satisfaction of the major course require- 
ment in hearing and speech sciences. 

HESP 410 Principles and Methods in 
Speech Therapy. (3) Prerequisite, HESP 
404 or 406. Comparative methods in the 
clinical management of speech prob- 
lems. 

HESP 411 Introduction to Audiology. (3) 
Prerequisites: HESP 202 and PHYS 102. 
Anatomy and physiology of hearing, in- 
troduction to measurement and to reha- 
bilitation of the hearing-handicapped. 

HESP 412 Rehabilitation of the Hearing 
Handicapped. (3) Prerequisite: HESP 411. 
Speech reading, auditory training, and 
speech training for hard-of-hearing chil- 
dren and adults. 

HESP 414 Seminar. (3) Prerequisite, per- 
mission of instructor. Individual projects 
in phonetic science, speech pathology, 
and audiology. 

HESP 499 Independent Study. (1-3) Pre- 
requisite, departmental approval. May be 
repeated for a maximum of 6 credits. 

HESP 604 Acoustical and Perceptual 
Phonetics. (3) Laboratory techniques in 
analysis of the acoustical and perceptual 
characteristics of the speech signal. 

HESP 606 Basic Hearing Measurements. 

(3) Prerequisite: HESP 411 or equivalent. 
Administration and interpretation of 
hearing tests by pure tones and by 
speech: screening and clinical test pro- 
cedures. 

HESP 610 Aphasia. (3) Language prob- 
lems of adults associated with brain in- 
jury. 

HESP 612 Stuttering. (3) 
HESP 614 Orofacial Anomalies. (3) 

HESP 616 Language Disorders of 
Children. (3) 

HESP 620 Articulation Disorders. (3) 

HESP 622 Neuromotor Disorders of 
Speech. (3) 

HESP 624 Voice Disorders. (3) 

HESP 626 Language Disorders and Lear- 
ning Disabilities. (3) Language disorders 
in children: pre-school through 
adolescence. Effects of oral language 
disabilities on social and emotional 
development and learning of academic 
skills, including implications for assess- 
ment and remediation. 

HESP 634 Medical Aspects of Speech 
and Hearing Disorders. (1-3) Lectures by 
physicians on embryological, anatomical, 
physiological, and neurological bases of 
speech and hearing disorders. 

HESP 638 Minor Research Problems. (1-3) 

Special projects in hearing and speech 
science. Repeatable for a maximum of 6 
credits. 

HESP 640 Advanced Principles of Hear- 
ing and Speech Therapy. (3) Analysis of 
the clinical process with emphasis on 
the applicaiton of learning theory to 
treatment of speech disorders. 



HESP 648 Clinical Practice in Speech. 
(1-3) Prerequisite, permission of instruc- 
tor. Supervised training in the application 
of clinical methods in the diagnosis and 
treatment of speech disorders. Repeat- 
able for a maximum of 6 credits. 
HESP 649 Clinical Practice in Audiology. 
(1-3) Prerequisite, permission of instruc- 
tor. Supervised training in the application 
of clinical methods in the diagnosis and 
treatment of hearing disorders. Repeat- 
able for a maximum of 6 credits. 

HESP 700 Hearing-Aid Characteristics 
and Performance. (3) Electroacoustic 
characteristics of hearing aids. Methods 
of hearing-aid evaluation and selection. 

HESP 702 Diagnostic Procedures in 
Speech Pathology. (3) Diagnostic tools 
and methods in the analysis of various 
types of speech disorders. Practicum re- 
quired. 

HESP 704 Physiology Phonetics. (3) Pre- 
requisite, HESP 606 or equivalent. Tech- 
niques in the study of the speech 
mechanism. 

HESP 706 Advanced Clinical Audiology. 
(3) Prerequisite, HESP 606 or equivalent. 
Techniques for evaluation of children 
and adults presenting special diagnostic 
problems. 

HESP 708 (1-6) Independent Study. (1-6) 

Prerequisite, permission of instructor. In- 
dividual research projects under 
guidance of a faculty member. Repeat- 
able for a maximum of 6 credits. 

HESP 710 Industrial and Environmental 
Noise Problems. (3) Prerequisite: permis- 
sion of instructor. Evaluation and control 
of noise hazards. Effects of noise on 
man. Medico-legal aspects of noise-in- 
duced hearing impairment. 
HESP 720 Structure and Function of the 
Hearing Mechanism. (3) Anatomy and 
physiology of the peripheral auditory and 
vestibular systems and pathologies of 
the peripheral hearing mechanism. 

HESP 722 Experimental Audiology. (3) 

Experimental techniques in the investiga- 
tion of problems in audiology. 

HESP 724 Quantitative Methods in Hear- 
ing and Speech Science. (3) Prerequisite, 
a course in basic statistics. Analysis of 
current procedures used in quantifying 
phenomena observed in hearing and 
speech science. 

HESP 728 Advanced Clinical Practice in 
Speech. (1-10) Prerequisite, previous 
enrollment in HESP 648 and permission 
of instructor. Clinical internship in 
selected off-campus facilities. Repeat- 
able for a maximum of 10 credits. 

HESP 729 Advanced Clinical Practice in 
Audiology. (1-10) Prerequisite, previous 
enrollment in HESP 649 and permission 
of instructor. Clinical internship in 
selected off-campus facilities. Repeat- 
able for a maximum of 10 credits. 

HESP 799 Master's Thesis Research. (1-6) 

HESP 804 Instrumental Phonetics. (3) 

Prerequisites, HESP 604 and 704 or per- 



mission of instructor. Instrumental tech- 
niques in phonetic science. 
HESP 806 Administration of Hearing and 
Speech Programs. (3) Problems of staff- 
ing, budgeting, and operating training 
and clinical service programs. 
HESP 810 Experimental Design in Hear- 
ing and Speech Science. (3) Prerequisite, 
HESP 724 or permission of instructor. 
Design and evaluation of research proj- 
ects. Preparation for undertaking the 
doctoral dissertation. 

HESP 820 Bioacoustics. (3) Prerequisite, 
permission of instructor. Functioning of 
the hearing mechanism in animals and 
humans. Laboratory research methods. 

HESP 822 Psychoacoustics. (3) Prereq 
uisite, permission of instructor. Study of 
human response to acoustic stimulation. 

HESP 826 Neurophysiology of Hearing. 

(3) Processing of stimuli by the auditory 
nervous system. 

HESP 848 Seminar in Audiology. (3) Pre- 
requisite, permission of instructor. Re- 
peatable for a maximum of 6 credits. 

HESP 858 Seminar in Speech Pathology. 

(3) Prerequisite, permission of instructor. 
Repeatatjie for a maximum of 6 credits. 

HESP 868 Seminar in Speech Science. (3) 

Prerequisite, permission of instructor. 
Repeatable for a maximum of 6 credits. 

HESP 878 Seminar in Language 
Disorders. (3) Prerequisite, permission of 
instructor. Repeatable for a maximum of 
6 credits. 

HESP 899 Doctoral Dissertation Re- 
search. (1-8) 

History Program 

Professor and Chairman: Evans 
Professors: BrushV Callcott. Cockburn, 
Cole. Duffy. Foust. Gilbert, Gordon, Haber, 
Harlan, Jashemski, Kent, Merrill, A. Olson, 
Prange. Rundell, E. Smith. Sparks. Yaney 
Associate Professors: Belz, Breslow. FarrelP, 
Flack, Folsom. Hoffman. Giffin, Greenberg, 
Grimsted, Kaufman, Matossian, Mayo, K. 
Olson, Stowasser, Warren, Wright 
Assistant Professors: Bradbury, Garden^, 
Harris, Holum, Lampe, Majeska. McCluster, 
Nicklason, Perinbam, Ridgway, Ruderman, 
H. Smith, Spiegel. Williams 
^joint appointment with Institute for Fluid 
Dynamics and Applied Mathematics 
2joint appointment with Secondary Education 
3joint appointment with Philosophy 

The Department of History offers pro- 
grams leading to the degrees of Master 
of Arts and Doctor of Philosophy. Areas 
of specialization include: United States, 
Ancient, Medieval, Early Modern 
European, Modern European, British, 
Russian, Latin American, African* 
Middle Eastern*, East Asian, Diplomatics, 
Science, and Women's History*. 
*Asterisked fields at M.A. level only. 

Admission and Degree Information 

The Master of Arts degree serves both 



124 / Graduate Programs 



as a firm grounding in a field of history 
for teaching purposes and as prepara- 
tion for the expeditious pursuit of the doc- 
torate. In addition to general Graduate 
School requirements, the aptitude parts 
of the GRE are required: it should be 
noted that an undergraduate major in 
history is not as such required for ad- 
mission. Of the thirty credit hours re- 
quired for the degree, six are In M.A. the- 
sis research courses (HIST 799). fifteen 
are normally In the major field of history 
and nine in a minor (which may be taken 
within or outside of the Department). 
The historiography course (HIST 600) 
Is required and may be used as a part 
of the major or minor: two 800-level 
research-writing seminars are required. 
Fifteen credit hours at the level of 600 or 
above are required in addition to the the- 
sis research courses. 

A written examination, which Is based 
in large part on a list of books pertaining 
to the thesis and its field submitted by 
the student and approved by the advi- 
sory committee, is required upon com- 
pletion of the coursework. There will 
also be a final oral examination which 
will be confined to the thesis and the 
field In which it lies. 

Admission to the doctoral program will 
be decided by the student s M.S. ex- 
amining committee on the basis of the 
students written and oral examinations, 
thesis, and record of achievements In 
coursework. 

The MA. degree in history is normally 
required for admission to the doctoral 
program, but it does not guarantee 
admission. Students with M.A. degrees 
awarded at other institutions will be 
asked to submit substantial evidence of 
their written work and will normally be ex- 
pected to have completed the equiva- 
lent of the work required of Maryland M.A. 
students. Every student must pass a 
written examination on his major field 
normally within eighteen months of en- 
try into the doctoral program: this ex- 
amination will test a broad, intelligent. 
and informed handling of the major his- 
torical problems and literature of that 
field. A secondary or minor field of study. 
supportive of the major, is required of ail 
doctoral students: it may be taken within 
or outside of the Department. The minor 
requirement may be fulfilled by taking a 
certain combination of courses, or by 
passing a general written examination 
in the appropriate field of study, or. with 
approval of the Departments Graduate 
Committee, by having done an M.A. 
major field in history substantially dif- 



ferent from the Ph.D. major field 

An oral examination on the students 
dissertation prospectus and a bibli- 
ography on the dissertation field is re- 
quired. The dissertation is to be under- 
stood as constituting the largest single 
portion of the doctoral program: It is 
expected to be a distinct contribution to 
histoncal knowledge and/or interpreta- 
tion. 

All doctoral students must show a 
reading competence in one foreign 
language: the language examination 
must be passed before the student 
takes the written examination in the 
major field. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

In addition to the field concentrations 
described above, the Department of 
History offers several forms of special- 
ized training. In the field of historical edit- 
ing the Department has introduced a 
successful internship course in archival 
work, in conjunction with the National 
Archives. Since 1970 the Department 
has sponsored a journal of history. The 
Maryland Historian, which features 
scholarly articles and reviews and which 
provides practical experience for grad- 
uate students in the production of a 
journal. The journal was founded and is 
managed and produced by graduate 
students in the Department of History. 
The Department also sponsors three 
major editorial projects: the Booker T. 
Washington Papers: the Samuel 
Gompers Papers: and the Freedmen s 
Bureau Papers. A number of History 
Department graduate students have 
gained valuable research and editing ex- 
perience on these projects, which also 
receive support from the National Histor- 
ical Publications and Records Commis- 
sion. In conjunction with the Department 
of Philosophy, the Department of History 
offers a special program of study in the 
history and philosophy of science. This 
program, administered by a joint com- 
mittee comprising members of both de- 
partmental faculties, offers under- 
graduate and graduate courses, spon- 
sors lectures, issues a newsletter, and 
holds colloquia. Along with several 
other universities, the Department of 
History sponsors and participates in the 
Folger Institute of Renaissance and 
Eighteenth-Century Studies. The Insti- 
tute offers seminars for graduate stu- 
dents and faculty, workshops, confer- 
ences, colloquia. and lectures. The Insti- 
tute awards fellowships to graduate stu- 
dents, and several of these awards 



have gone to doctoral candidates from 
the University of Maryland History De- 
partment. Still another project supported 
by the Department of History is the 
Pompeii excavations under the direc- 
tion of faculty member Professor 
Wilhelmina Jashemski. This project, 
which is funded In part by the National 
Endowment for the Humanities, has 
furnished subjects for theses and dis- 
sertations for graduate students In Ancient 
History who have worked on it. 

Financial Assistance 

The Department of History offers 
financial assistance principally In the 
form of teaching assistantships to out- 
standing graduate students. These posi- 
tions, which vary in number according to 
the availability of funds and of which 
there were 56 in the academic year 
1976-77. are awarded to advanced stu- 
dents working toward the Ph.D. or M.A. 
degree. Appointment as a teaching as- 
sistant provides students an opportunity 
to work closely with faculty members In 
the teaching of undergraduate survey 
courses In history. 

Additional Information 

Complete descriptions of programs and 
requirements may be obtained from the 
History Department. 

Courses 

HIST 400 Independent Study. (1-6) Pre- 
requisite: departmental approval of research 
project and consent of the department. Avail- 
able to all students who wish to pursue a 
specific research topic. 

HIST 401 The Scientific Revolution-From 
Copernicus to Newton. (3) Major events in 
the history of physical science during the 16th 
and 1 7th centuries and their relation to 
philosophy, religion and society in Westem 
Europe. The attack on ancient and medieval 
scientific theories: the transition from geo- 
centric to heliocentric astronomy: discovenes 
of Kepler. Galileo and Newton: and the estab- 
lishment of the 'mechanical philosophy' that 
dominated early modem science. 

HIST 402 The Development of Modern Phys- 
ical Science-From Newton to Einstein. 

(3) The history of physics in the 18th and 19th 
centuries, including some of its connections 
with mathematics, technology, chemistry and 
planetary science. Emphasis on internal tech- 
nical developments in physical theory, with 
some discussion of experimental, philosophi- 
cal and sociological aspects. This is the 
second part of a three-semester sequence 
(HIST 401 . HIST 402. PHYS 490); each part 
may be taken independently of the others. 
For HIST 402 the prerequisites are MATH 
1 1 and PHYS 1 1 2 or 1 1 7. or equivalent com- 
petence in mathematics and physics. 

HIST 404 History of Modem Biology. (3) 

The internal development of biology in the 
nineteenth and twentieth centunes. including 



Graduate Programs / 125 



evolution, cell theory, heredity and develop- 
ment, spontaneous generation, and mech- 
anism-vitalism controversies. The philo- 
sophical aspects of the development of scien- 
tific knowledge and the interaction of biology 
with chemistry and physics. 

HIST 407 History of Technology. (3) A sur 

vey course designed for junior, senior and 
graduate students with a solid base in either 
engineering or history; it will cover the time 
span from Greek antiquity to the first world 
war Technology will be studied as a cultural 
force controlled by laws of its own and oper- 
ating within a distinctive conceptual framework. 
The course will concentrate on the changing 
character of technology in history and on the 
interactions between technology and other 
cultural forces such as science, philosophy, 
art, material culture, and the economy, 

HIST 408 Selected Topics in Women's 
History. (3) In-depth study of selected topics 
on women in Amencan society including 
such areas as women and the law, women 
and politics, the 'feminine mystique', and the 
new feminism', fviay be repeated to a maxi- 
mum of SIX semester hours. 

HIST 410 History of Early Medicine: From 
Thaumaturgy and Theurgy to the 17th 
Century Theories. (3) A histoncal sun/ey of 
the development of medicine in Europe and 
Asia from earliest times to the eighteenth 
century. Topics discussed include: primitive 
diseases, Egyptian, Chinese. Greek and 
medieval medicine, epidemics, surgical de- 
velopments, the physician and the develop- 
ment of public health administration. Enroll- 
ment limited to upper division and graduate 
students. 

HIST 41 1 History of the Emergence of 
Modern Medicine. (3) Prerequisite, junior 
standing. Development of modern medicine 
from the eighteenth century to the present 
with emphasis on the United States, including 
American Indian medicine, grovrth of medical 
professions, hospitals and public health facil- 
ities, surgery, clinical medicine, psychiatry 
and modern medical specialization, 

HIST 414 History of European Ideas I. (3) 

Review of the basic western intellectual tradi- 
tions as a heritage from the ancient-world. 
Selected important currents of thought from 
the scientific revolution of the 16th and 17th 
centuries down to the end of the 18th century. 

HIST 415 History of European Ideas II. (3) 

A continuation of HIFN 414 emphasizing 19th 
and 20th century thought. 

HIST 416 Modern Jewish Intellectual His- 
tory I. (3) An introduction to the major ideas 
and ideologies of the Jewish people from the 
penod of the expulsion from Spain in 1492 
until the generation of Moses tVlendelsschn 
and his contemporanes at the end of the eigh- 
teenth century. The course will emphasize 
major intellectual developments within the 
Jewish community shaped by its encounter 
with major cultural developments such as the 
Renaissance, Reformation and Religious 
Scepticism as well as by the constant threats 
to its collective identity and physical well- 
being throughout this entire period. 

HIST 417 Modern Jewish Intellectual His- 
tory II. (3) An introduction to the major ideas 
and ideologies of the Jewish people from the 

126 / Graduate Programs 



end of the eighteenth century until the 
present. The course will consider the major 
intellectual responses to the problem of Jewish 
identity in the context of the effects of political 
and social emancipation, nationalism and 
socialism, seculansm and cultural assimila- 
tion, as well as political anti-semitism and 
physical extermination upon the Jewish 
community. 

HIST 419 Special Topics in History. (3) 

May be repeated to a maximum of nine hours. 

HIST 420 Ancient Greece. (3) Greek history 
and culture from the Bronze Age to 200 B C. 
Concentration of the life and institutions of the 
city-state, poetry and society, the 
Peloponnesian War, and Alexander The 
Great 

HIST 421 History of Rome. (3) Roman his- 
tory from the foundation of the city to the time 
of Constantine the Great, concentrating on 
impenalism, the crisis of the republic, Augustus 
and the organization of monarchy, and city 
life during the pnncipate. (Students who have 
received credit for HIFN 410 not admitted.) 

HIST 422 Byzantine Empire I. (3) The 

Eastern Roman Empire from Constantine the 
Great to the cnsis of the ninth century. The 
development of the Late Roman State into 
the Medieval Chnstian Byzantine Empire and 
the evolution of a distinctive Byzantine culture. 

HIST 423 Byzantine Empire II. (3) The 

Byzantine Empire from the Macedonian 
Renaissance to the conquest of Constantinople 
by the Turks in 1453: The Byzantine Empire 
at its height, the crusades, Byzantium as a 
minor power, and its contributions to the 
Renaissance and the cultures of Russia and 
the Balkans. 

HIST 424 History of Russia to 1801. (3) 

A History of Russia from earliest times to 
1917. 

HIST 425 History of Russia from 1801- 
1917. (3) A history of Russia from earliest 
times to 1917. 

HIST 426 The History of Spain and Portu- 
gal to 1700. (3) A survey of the ancient, 
medieval, and early modern history of the 
Ibenan Peninsula with attention to Spanish 
and Portuguese expansion overseas and the 
role of Spain in Europe under the Hapsburg 
Kings. 

HIST 427 The History of Spain and Portu- 
gal since 1700. (3) The social, political and 
cultural development of modern Spam and 
Portugal, emphasizing the decline of the 
monarchies, Napoleonic intervention, the 
loss of the main part of the overseas empires, 
civil strife, and the rise of Strong-Man Govern- 
ment. 

HIST 430 Tudor England. (3) An examina- 
tion of the political, religious and social forces 
in English life, 1485-1603, with special 
emphasis on Tudor government, the English 
Reformation and the Elizabethan Era. 

HIST 431 Stuart England. (3) An examina- 
tion of the political, religious and social forces 
in English life, 1603-1714, with special em- 
phasis on Puritanism and the English Revolu- 
tions 

HIST 432 Britain in the 18th Century. (3) 
Developments in Great Bntain from the Revo- 
lution of 1688 to the end of the Napoleonic Wars. 



HIST 433 Modern Britain. (3) A survey of 
British History from the age of the French 
Revolution to World War I with emphasis 
upon such subjects as Britain's role in the 
world, the democratization of the state, the 
problems arising from industrialism and ur- 
banism. and Irish and Imperial problems. 

HIST 434 Constitutional History of Great 
Britain I. (3) Constitutional development in 
England, with emphasis on the history of the 
royal prerogative, the growth of the common 
law, the development of Parliament, and the 
emergence of systematized government. 
First semester, to 1485. 

HIST 435 Constitutional History of Great 
Britain II. (3) Constitutional development in 
England, with emphasis on the history of the 
royal prerogative, the growth of the common 
law, the development of Parliament, and the 
emergence of systemized government. 
Second semester, since 1485, 

HIST 436 History of the British Empire. (3) 

An analysis of the development of the British 
Empire since the American Revolution. Par- 
ticular emphasis is given to the problem of 
responsible self-government, the evolution of 
the British Empire into a commonwealth of 
nations and the problems of the dependent 
empire. Recommended prerequisites — HIST 
112, 113, 141, or 254. 

HIST 437 Modern France from Napoleon 
to DeGaulle. (3) The changing political and 
cultural values of French society in response 
to recurrent cnses throughout the 19th and 
20th centuries. Students should have had 
some previous survey of either western 
civilization or European History 

HIST 440 Germany in the Nineteenth 
Century, 1815-1914. (3) The development 
of modern Germany and the rise of national 
socialism. 

HIST 441 Germany in the Nineteenth 
Century, 1914-1945. (3) Germany s aims 
and policies during World War I, its condition 
and policies in the inter-war period, the rise of 
national socialism, and Germany's part in 
World War II. 

HIST 442 The Soviet Union. (3) A history 
of Soviet Russia and the Soviet Union from 1917 
to the present. Stress on the relationship 
between Marxist theory and practice, and the 
development of peculiarly socialist institu- 
tions and practices. 

HIST 443 Modern Balkan History. (3) A politi- 
cal, socio-economic, and cultural history of 
Yugoslavia, Bulgaria, Romania, Greece, and 
Albania from the breakdown of Ottoman domi- | 
nation to the present. Emphasis is on move- 
ments for national liberation during the nineteentt 
century and on approaches to modernization 
in the twentieth century. 

HIST 444 Nineteenth Century European 
Diplomatic History. (3) The development 
and execution of European Diplomacy from the 
Congress of Vienna to the outbreak of World 
War I, concentrating on Central and Western 
Europe 

HIST 445 Twentieth Century European 
Diplomatic History. (3) The development 
and execution of European diplomacy from 
the outbreak of World War I to the conclusion 
of World War II, concentrating on Central and 
Western Europe. 



HIST 446 European Economic History to 

1750. (3) Economic development of Europe 
from the manorial economy of medieval feu- 
dalism through the emergence of capitalist insti- 
tutions and overseas empires to the advent of 
the Industnal Revolution. 

HIST 447 European Economic History 
Since 1750. (3) The mainsprings of the in- 
dustrial revolution first in 18th century 
England and then across the rest of Europe 
during the 19th and 20th centuries. Empha- 
sis on the English. French, German. Austro- 
Hungarian and Russian experiences with pri- 
vate Capitalism and public policy, including 
Fascism and Communism Social conse- 
quences of industrial development such as 
urbanization and the nse of labor movements 

HIST 450 Economic History of the United 
States to 1865. (3) The development of the 
American economy from Columbus through 
the Civil War 

HIST 451 Economic History of the United 
States after 1865. (3) The development of 
the American economy from the Civil War to 
the present. 

HIST 452 Diplomatic History of the United 
States to 1898. (3) Amencan foreign rela- 
tions from the beginning of the American 
Revolution in 1775 through the Spanish- 
Amehcan War of 1898. including both inter- 
national developments and domestic influ- 
ences that contributed to American expan- 
sion in w^orld affairs, and analyses of signifi- 
cant individuals active in American diplomacy 
and foreign policy. 

HIST 453 Diplomatic History of the United 
States since 1898. (3) American foreign rela- 
tions in the twentieth century during the age 
of Imperialism. World War I, the Great Depres- 
sion. World War II. and the Cold War. A 
continuation of HIUS 422. 

HIST 454 Constitutional History of the United 
States — From Colonial Origins to 1860. (3) 

The interaction of government, law. and poli- 
tics in the constitutional system. The nature 
and purpose of constitutions and constitu- 
tionalism: the relationship between the consti- 
tution and social forces and influences, the 
way in which constitutional principles, rules. 
ideas, and institutions affect events and are in 
turn affected by events The origins of Amer- 
ican politics and constitutionalism through 
the constitutional convention of 1787. Major 
constitutional problems such as the origins of 
judicial review, democratization of govern- 
ment, slavery in ther territones and political 
system as a whole 

HIST 455 Constitutional History of the 
United States-Since 1860. (3) American 
public law and government, with emphasis 
on the interaction of government, law, and 
politics. Emphasis on the political-constitu- 
tional system as a whole, rather than simply 
the development of constitutional law by the 
Supreme Court. Major crises in American 
government and politics such as Civil War. 
Reconstruction, the 1890s the New Deal era. 
the civil disorders of the 1960 s, 

HIST 456 History of Ideas in America to 
1865. (3) The ideas, conflicts, myths, and 
realities that shaped American character and 
society from the first settlements to the Civil 
War. 



HIST 457 History of Ideas in America 
Since 1865. (3) A continuation of HIUS 424 

HIST 459 Society in America: Historical 
Topics. (3) A consideration of selected as- 
pects of American society from colonial 
times to the present Special emphasis on 
regionalism, immigration, nativism, minor- 
ities, urbanization, and social responses to 
technological changes May be repeated to a 
maximum of six credits if topics are different. 

HIST 460 A Cultural and Social History of 
the American Worker. (3) Examines the free 
Amencan working class in terms of its compo- 
sition: its myihs and Utopias: its social condi- 
tions: and its impact on American institutions, 

HIST 461 Blacks in American Life: 1865 to 
Present. (3) The role of the black in America 
since slavery, with emphasis on twentieth 
century developments: the migration from 
farm to city: the growth of the civil rights 
movement: the race question as a national 
problem. 

HIST 463 History of the Old South. (3) 

The Golden Age of the Chesapeake, the insti- 
tution of slavery, the frontier south, the 
antebellum plantation society, the develop- 
ment of regional identity and the experiment 
in independence. 

HIST 464 History of the New South. (3) 

The expenence of defeat, the restructuring of 
southern society, the impact of industnaliza- 
tion and the modern racial adjustment. 

HIST 465 History of the American Fron- 
tier-the trans-Allegheny West. (3) Major 
historical interpretation of the significance to 
the period of the trans-Allegheny West. 
Assesses the impact of the frontier experience 
on American history. Equal attention is given 
to political, economic, social and cultural prob- 
lems associated with the development of the 
west, Indian culture, treatment of the Indians, 
and Indian-White relations are integrated into 
the course through readings and lectures. 

HIST 466 History of the American Frontier- 
The Trans-Mississippi West. (3) Explora- 
tion, settlement and development of the trans- 
Mississippi West. Assesses the impact of the 
frontier experience on Amencan history. 
Equal attention is given to political, economic, 
social and cultural problems associated with 
the development of the West, Indian culture, 
treatment of the Indians, and Indian-White 
relations are integrated into the course 
through readings and lectures. 

HIST 467 History of Maryland. (3) Political 
social and economic history of Maryland from 
seventeenth century to the present. 

HIST 470 Diplomatic History of Latin Amer- 
ica. (3) A survey of the political, economic 
and cultural relations of the Latin Amencan 
Nations with emphasis on their relations with 
the United States and the development of the 
inter-American system, 

HIST 471 History of Brazil. (3) The history 
of Brazil with emphasis on the national period. 

HIST 472 History of the Argentine Repub- 
lic. (3) Concentration upon the recent history 
of Argentina with emphasis upon the social 
and economic development of a third world 
nation. 



HIST 474 History of Mexico and the Carib- 
bean I. (3) History of Mexico. Central Amer- 
ica and the Antilles, beginning with the pre- 
Spanish Indian cultures and continuing 
through European contact, conquest, and 
colonial dominance, down to the beginning 
of the Mexican War for independence in 1810 

HIST 475 History of Mexico and the Carrib- 
bean II. (3) A continuation of HIFN 406 with 
emphasis on the political development of the 
Mexican nation 

HIST 476 History of Canada. (3) Prerequi- 
sites, HIST 241 , 242 or 253. 254, A history of 
Canada, with special emphasis on the nine- 
teenth century and upon Canadian relations 
with Great Britain and the United Slates. 

HIST 480 History of Traditional China. (3) 

China from earliest times to 1644 AD, 
Emphasis on the development of traditional 
Chinese culture, society, and government. 

HIST 481 A History of Modern China. (3) 

Modern China from 1644 to the People s 
Republic of China, Emphasis on the coming 
of the west to China and the various stages 
of the Chinese reaction 

HIST 482 History of Japan to 1800. (3) 

Traditional Japanese civilization from the age 
of Shinto mythology and introduction of con- 
tinental learning down to the rule of military 
families, the transition to a money economy, 
and the creation of a townsmen's culture. A 
survey of political, economic, religious, and 
cultural history, 

HIST 483 History of Japan Since 1800. (3) 

Japans renewed contact with the western 
world and emergence as a modern state, 
industnal society, and world power, 1800-1931 
and Japan's road to war, occupation, and re- 
covery, 1931 to the present, 

HIST 485 History of Chinese Communism. 

(3) An analysis of the vanous factors in 
modern Chinese history that led to the victory 
of the Chinese Communist Party in 1949 
and of the subsequent course of events of the 
people s Republic of China, from CA, 1919 to 
the present. 

HIST 490 The Middle East I. (3) A survey of 
the political, cultural and institutional history 
covering the period up to the tenth century. 

HIST 491 The Middle East II. (3) A survey 
of the political, cultural and institutional his- 
tory covering the period up from the tenth 
century to the beginnings of the nineteenth 
century 

HIST 492 The Contemporary Middle East. 

(3) This course covers the break-up of the 
Ottoman Empire and the emergence of con- 
temporary states of the area. 

HIST 495 Twentieth Century Algeria. (3) 

A brief survey of the history of Algeria and 
an indepth study of twentieth century events 
leading up to and including the War of Libera- 
tion and Algerian Independence. Reading 
knowledge of French desirable. 

HIST 496 A History of West Africa. (3) 

West Africa from approximately 4500 B C. to 
the Colonial Era. The development of agricul- 
tural and technological achievements, which 
made it possible for West African civilizations 
to emerge and endure and the development 
of the medieval and early modern state sys- 



Graduate Programs / 127 



terns. The structure of West African societies, 

the people and their cultural history. 

HIST 497 Economic History of West Africa. 

(3) The economic history of West Africa from 
Neolithic Times to the end of the Colonial 
Era. Reading knowledge of French desirable. 

HIST 600 Historiography. (3) 

HIST 601 Methods in Historical Research. 

(3) Techniques of historical research and writ- 
ing, emphasizing archival research, evalua- 
tion of sources, bibliography, and form and 
style in writing. 

HIST 605 The Teaching of History in Insti- 
tutions of Higher Learning. (3) 
HIST 608 Occupational Internship. (1-6) 
Prerequisite: permission of department chair- 
man. Individually arranged internship tailored 
to individual student needs with a coopera- 
ting public or private agency in the Metropol- 
itan, Washington/Baltimore area. Repeat- 
able to a maximum of 6 hours. 
HIST 609 Readings in the History of Medi- 
cine and Modern Science. (3) 
HIST 619 Special Topics in History. (3) 
HIST 628 Readings in Colonial American 
History. (3) 

HIST 629 Readings in the American 
Revolution and the Formative Period. (3) 

HIST 638 Readings in the Middle Period 
and Civil War. (3) 

HIST 639 Readings in Reconstruction and 
the New Nation. (3) 

HIST 648 Readings in Recent American 
History. (3) 

HIST 658 Readings in American Constitu- 
tional History. (3) 

HIST 659 Readings in American Intel- 
lectual History. (3) 

HIST 668 Readings in American Social 
History. (3) 

HIST 669 Readings in the Economic His- 
tory of the United States. (3) An examina- 
tion of the major issues in the history of the 
economy of the United States from the 17th 
century to the present, as these have been 
discussed by the more important economic 
historians. Repeatable to a maximum of six 
hours. 

HIST 678 Readings in American Labor 
History. (3) Social and cultural history of the 
American working class with special attention 
to communities based on ethnicity, race, sex, 
residence and ideology; history of the labor 
movement; selected comparisons with work- 
ing-class communities of other countnes. 

HIST 679 Readings in the History of Amer- 
ican Foreign Policy. (3) 
HIST 689 Readings in Southern History. (3) 
HIST 718 Readings in Medieval History. (3) 

HIST 719 Readings in the History of the 
Renaissance and Reformation. (3) 
HIST 728 Readings in Early Modern Euro- 
pean History. (3) 

HIST 729 Readings in Modern European 
History. (3) Reading knowledge of some 
European language recommended but not 
required. 



HIST 739 Readings in the History of Great 
Britain and the British Empire-Common- 
wealth. (3) 

HIST 748 Readings in Modem French His- 
tory. (3) 

HIST 749 Readings in German History, 
1815 to the Present. (3) Reading knowledge 
of German is encouraged, but not required. 
May be repeated for a maximum of nine 
semester hours. 

HIST 758 Readings in Eastern European 
History. (3) Selected topics in the history 
of the Habsburg Monarchy and the successor 
states. Poland and the Balkans. Emphasis 
on the rise of nationalism during the 19th 
century and the experience with facism and 
communism in the 20th century. 
HIST 759 Readings in Russian History. (3) 
HIST 768 Readings in Chinese History. (3) 
HIST 769 Readings in Japanese History. (3) 
HIST 778 Readings in Latin American His- 
tory. (3) 

HIST 779 Readings in Middle Eastern His- 
tory. (3) 

HIST 788 Readings in European Eco- 
nomic and Labor History. (3) Selected 
topics in European economic history from 
1 648 to the Second World War. Attention 
to the mainsprings of industrialization, the 
economic consequences of war and revolu- 
tion, and the vahety of European lat>or move- 
ments An introduction to the use of quantita- 
tive methods is provided. 
HIST 789 Readings in Modern European 
Intellectual History. (3) 
HIST 798 Readings in Jewish History. (3) 
Readings on selected topics in Jewish His- 
tory. Emphasis on analysis of primary 
sources. Reading knowledge of Hebrew 
recommended May be repeated to a maxi- 
mum of 6 credits. 

HIST 799 Master's Thesis Research. (1-6) 
HIST 808 Seminar in the History of Medi- 
cine and Modern Science. (3) Prerequisite. 
HIST 708 or consent of instructor. 
HIST 818 Seminar in Historical Editing. (3) 
An apprenticeship in the editing of documen- 
tary sources and scholarly articles for publica- 
tion. Repeatable to a maximum of six hours. 
HIST 820 Seminar in Chinese History. (3) 
HIST 821 Seminar in Japanese History. (3) 
HIST 828 Seminar in Middle Eastern His- 
tory. (3) 

HIST 829 Seminar in Latin American His- 
tory. (3) 

HIST 839 Seminar in Medieval and Early 
Modern European History. (3) 
HIST 840 Seminar in Greek History. (3) 
HIST 841 Seminar in Roman History. (3) 

HIST 844 Seminar in the History of the 
Renaissance and Reformation. (3) 
HIST 848 Seminar in Modern European 
History. (3) 
HIST 849 Seminar in Russian History. (3) 

HIST 850 Seminar in East European His- 
tory. (3) Research papers on the history of 



lands which are now Austna. Hungary. 
Czechoslovakia. Poland and the Balkan 
States, from the 18th century to the present. 

HIST 851 Seminar in German History. (3) 

Prerequisite; HIFN 798. or consent of instruc- 
tor. Reading knowledge of German is re- 
quired. May be repeated to a maximum of 
six semester hours. 

HIST 852 Seminar in Modem French His- 
tory. (3) 

HIST 853 Seminar In Nineteenth Century 
Europe. (3) 

HIST 854 Seminar in 20th Century Euro- 
pean History. (3) Seminar in 20th European 
History. 1914 to present. Prerequisite; HIFN 
758. or consent of instnjctor. 
HIST 855 Seminar in Modem European 
Intellectual History. (3) 
HIST 856 Seminar in Modern European 
Diplomatic History. (3) Prerequisite; read- 
ing ability of either French or German: a 
course in Modern European History. May be 
repeated for a maximum of nine semester 
hours. 

HIST 857 Seminar in the Social and Cul- 
tural History of Europe.(3)Research methods 
for multi-generational family history, the com- 
parative study of folk cultures, and the study 
of creative minorities. Includes a general intro- 
duction to research in European society and 
culture, 

HIST 85S Seminar in the History of Great 
Britain and The British Empire-Common- 
wealth. (3) 

HIST 859 Seminar in History of Modem 
Wars. (3) 

HIST 860 Seminar in Tudor and Stuart 
England. (3) 

HIST 861 Seminar in English Law and 
Government, 1550-1760. (3) Prerequisites, 
one of the following courses; HIFN 423. 434, 
435. 436 or consent of instructor. From the 
accession of Elizabeth I to the death of 
George II. 

HIST 878 Seminar in Colonial American 
History. (3) 

HIST 879 Seminar in the American Revolu- 
tion and Formative Period. (3) 
HIST 880 Seminar in Southern History. (3) 
HIST 881 Seminar in American Frontier 
History. (3) A research-writing seminar deal- 
ing with selected topics related to the Amen- 
can Frontier, especially the trans-Appala- 
chian and trans-Mississippi West, 1774 to the 
20th century, Repeatable to a maximum of 
six semester hours. 

HIST 882 Seminar in the History of Mary- 
land. (3) 

HIST 888 Seminar in the Middle Period and 
Civil War. (3) 

HIST 889 Seminar in Reconstruction and 
the New Nation. (3) 

HIST 890 Seminar in American Intellectual 
History. (3) 

HIST 892 Seminar in American Social His- 
tory. (3) 

HIST 893 Seminar in the Economic History 
of the United States. (3) A research-writing 



128 / Graduate Programs 



seminar dealing with selected topics in Ameri- 
can economic development from the colonial 
period to the present. Repeatable to a maxi- 
mum of six semester hours. 

HIST 894 Seminar in American Labor His- 
tory. (3) Advanced research and writing on 
selected topics in the history of American 
workers, their conditions, communities, 
organizations and ideas. 

HIST 895 Seminar In American Constitu- 
tional History. (3) 

HIST 896 Seminar In the History of Ameri- 
can Foreign Policy. (3) 

HIST 898 Seminar In Recent American His- 
tory. (3) 

HIST 899 Doctoral Dissertation Research. 
(1-8) 



Concentration in the 
History and Philosopliy 
of Science 

The Committee on the History and 
Philosophy of Science supervises 
graduate study leading to the M.A. 
and Ph.D. degrees in History or 
Philosophy. Courses are offered in a 
wide range of subjects in the history 
and philosophy of science, medi- 
cine, and technology, and research 
facilities are available on the College 
Park campus and in the Washington 
area. For advanced research the em- 
phasis is on the history and philoso- 
phy of physical and biological 
science in the 19th and 20th cen- 
turies; history of the philosophy of 
science and scientific ideas; 
genetics, computer science, geo- 
physics and astronomy; scientific in- 
stitutions, medicine and public 
health in the United States. Inte- 
gration of historical and philosophi- 
cal interpretations of science is 
stressed in both teaching and re- 
search. 

Students should apply for admis- 
sion to either the History Depart- 
ment or the Philosophy Department, 
indicating History and Philosophy of 
Science as the field of specializa- 
tion. Since people with diverse back- 
grounds can be successful in this 
field, there are no rigid requirements 
for admission; the quality of a stu- 
dent's work in science, history, and 
philosophy, as demonstrated not on- 
ly by grades and test scores but also 
by papers and independent projects, 
is more important than the numbers 
of credit hours in these subjects. 
But prospective students should 
also be warned that the minimum re- 
quirement for doing research in the 



history and philosophy of science 
covers substantially more areas than 
normally expected of Ph.D's in any 
one of the traditional fields of 
history or philosophy or a science; it 
includes training in a science equi- 
valent to a B.S. (preferably M.S.) de- 
gree, proficiency in both oral and 
written expression, and ability to 
read at least one foreign language 
(preferably both French and Ger- 
man). 

The Committee also encourages 
applications from students who do 
not intend to obtain a Ph.D. in 
history and philosophy of science 
but desire only the M.A. as prepara- 
tion for careers in science teaching, 
government service, technical ad- 
ministration, museum work, etc., or 
who plan to proceed to the Ph.D. in 
another field. 

A few teaching assistantships are 
available in the History and Philoso- 
phy departments for students who 
have adequate backgrounds in those 
subjects. 

Detailed information may be ob- 
tained by writing to the Chairperson, 
Committee on the History and Phi- 
losophy of Science, Skinner Build- 
ing, University of Maryland. 

Horticulture Program 

Professor and Chairman: Twigg 
Professors: Kramer, Link, Reynolds, 

Scott (emeritus), Shanks, Stark, 

Thompson, Wiley 
Associate Professors: Baker, Beste, 

Bouwkamp, Gouin, Schales 
Assistant Professors: Solomos 
Lecturer: Koch (Visiting) 

The Department of Horticulture of- 
fers graduate study leading to the 
Master of Science and Doctor of 
Philosophy degrees. The Master of 
Science degree is offered with both 
thesis and non-thesis options. Can- 
didates place major emphasis in the 
areas of pomology, olericulture, flori- 
culture, or ornamental horticulture. 
Within these commodity areas, 
students may direct their studies 
and research efforts to mineral nutri- 
tion, postharvest physiology, plant 
breeding, chemical growth regula- 
tion, water relations, plant propaga- 
tion, histochemistry, photoperiodism 
and environmental control, and other 
factors affecting production, post- 
harvest handling, and preservation 
of horticultural crops. The candi- 
date's program may be directed 



toward a career in research, teach- 
ing, extension education, or in- 
dustry. The research activities re- 
quired for the thesis or dissertation 
are normally carried out in conjunc- 
tion with the research programs of 
the departmental staff. 

Admission and Degree Information 

Students entering with a B.S. degree 
in Horticulture can normally com- 
plete ail requirements for the M.S. in 
2 years on a half-time basis, 4 years 
for the Ph.D. Full-time students 
should complete the requirements in 
a shorter time. Students seeking ad- 
mission should present under- 
graduate preparation in horticulture, 
botany, chemistry, and supporting 
agricultural disciplines. Those 
without this background are advised 
to enroll as undergraduate students 
to correct these deficiencies. The 
Graduate Record Examination is not 
required. 

Students entering the doctoral 
program should have, or plan on 
completing, a Master of Science de- 
gree in Horticulture, although 
presentation of the M.S. in a related 
plant science field may be accept- 
able. 

Upon admission, the student 
selects a faculty advisor and an ad- 
visory committee is appointed. It is 
an early function of the committee 
to work with the candidate in 
developing a program of courses 
and research, to meet the goals and 
aspirations of the students. The 
Department requires no foreign 
language proficiency. A compre- 
hensive, oral examination is given 
each candidate for the M.S.; candi- 
dates for the Ph.D. take an oral quali- 
fying examination covering the 
dissertation. 

Facilities and Special Resources 

Modern laboratory and greenhouse 
facilities are located at the College 
Park campus. Laboratory instrumen- 
tation provides for chromatography, 
spectrometry, elemental analysis, 
histology, and other procedures. A 
system for automatically monitoring 
respiratory gases and volatiles is 
available in connection with con- 
trolled atmosphere chambers. 
Control led-temperature storages and 
growth chambers provide facilities 
for postharvest and environmental 
control studies. Greenhouse and 
plot areas are available for research 



Graduate Programs / 129 



with floricuitural and ornamental 
plants. Orchards for research with 
fruits are located at the Plant Re- 
search Farm 7 miles from the cam- 
pus. Other research studies are con- 
ducted cooperatively with fruit 
growers in the western part of the 
state. Field research with vegetable 
crops is carried on at the Vegetable 
Research Farm, Salisbury, and with 
ornamental and vegetable crops at 
Cheston-on-Wye near Grasonville. 
The Beltsville Research Center of 
the United States Department of 
Agriculture is located 3 miles from 
the campus. Students have the op- 
portunity to attend seminars at the 
Research Center, to take specialized 
courses of the USDA graduate 
school and, in certain cases, to con- 
duct research projects In coopera- 
tion with the personnel at the USDA 
Research Center. In addition to 
library facilities at the University, the 
National Agricultural Library at the 
Research Center is readily available 
to graduate students of the Uni- 
versity. 

Financial Assistance 

Some graduate students are sup- 
ported with financial aid. Research 
and teaching assistantships are of- 
fered to students on full admission 
status, as available. All graduate 
assistants are expected to assist In 
the teaching program of the Depart- 
ment, and those in the fvl.A. program 
will follow the thesis option. 

Courses 

HORT 411 Technology of Fruits. (3) Three 
lectures per week. Prerequisite. HORT 
112, Prerequisite, or concurrent BOTN 
441. A critical analysis of research work 
and application of the principles of the 
plant physiology, chemistry, and botany 
to practical problems in commercial 
production. 

HORT 417 Tree and Small Fruit Manage- 
ment. (1) Primarily designed for voca- 
tional agriculture teachers and extension 
agents. Special emphasis will be placed 
upon new and improved commercial 
methods of production of the leading 
tree and small fruit crops. Current prob- 
lems and their solution will receive 
special attention. 

HORT 422 Technology of Vegetables. (3) 

Three lectures per week. Prerequisite, 
HORT 222, prerequisite or concurrent, 
BOTN 441. A critical analysis of research 
work and application of principles of 
plant physiology, chemistry, and botany 
to practical problems in commercial 
vegetable production. 



HORT 427 Truck Crop Management. (1) 

Primarily dasigned for teachers of voca- 
tional agriculture and extension agents. 
Special emphasis will be placed upon 
new and improved methods of produc- 
tion of the leading truck crops. Current 
problems and their solutions will receive 
special attention. 

HORT 432 Fundamentals of Greenhouse 
Crop Production. (3) Three lectures per 
week. Prerequisite, HORT 231. This 
course deals with a study of the commer- 
cial production and marketing of or- 
namental plant crops under greenhouse, 
plastic houses and out-of-door condi- 
tions. 

HORT 433 Plants for Interior Decoration. 

(2) Prerequisite: HORT 231 or permission 
of instructor. A study of the selection, 
production and use os plants for interior 
decoration and their installation and 
maintenance under interior conditions. 

HORT 451 Technology of Ornamentals. 

(3) Three lectures per week. Prerequisite, 
or concurrent BOTN 441. A study of the 
physiological processes of the plant as 
related to the growth, flowering and 
storage of ornamental plants. 

HORT 453 Woody Plant Materials. (3) 

Prerequisite, BOTN 212. A field and 
laboratory study of trees, shrubs, and 
vines used in ornamental plantings. 

HORT 454 Woody Plant Materials. (3) 

Prerequisite, BOTN 21